jamesq

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So I keep getting confused when the passage states anti b antibodies, is this an antibody against the b-antibody? If so, does this mean it binds to the b antibody. I ask because they mention that A blood type produces anti-b-antibodies
 

TypeSH07

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It means it has an antibody against B. Having type A blood means that it has the A antigen so that no antibodies will be produced against it. However, it does not have the B antigen, so it will produce an antibody against it. As a result, someone with type A blood cannot receive blood from someone with type B blood.

This brings me to my own antibody question. Is it possible to use an antibody that was generated in some other species in humans?
 
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jamesq

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It means it has an antibody against B. Having type A blood means that it has the A antigen so that no antibodies will be produced against it. However, it does not have the B antigen, so it will produce an antibody against it. As a result, someone with type A blood cannot receive blood from someone with type B blood.
I guess that makes sense, but then why dont they just call it b antibody instead of anti-b antibody, the wording seems to imply its a antibody against the b antibody. I guess what you are saying is that anti-b-antibody is an antibody against the b antigen?
 

TypeSH07

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No you're right. An anti B antibody is an antibody against B. In type A blood, the immune system recognizes the A antigen so it won't illicit an immune response. Since in type A blood you don't have a B antigen it will cause an immune response b/c it is viewed as "foreign".
 
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jamesq

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No you're right. An anti B antibody is an antibody against B. In type A blood, the immune system recognizes the A antigen so it won't illicit an immune response. Since in type A blood you don't have a B antigen it will cause an immune response b/c it is viewed as "foreign".
Thank you for your help!
 

reezer4

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This brings me to my own antibody question. Is it possible to use an antibody that was generated in some other species in humans?
No, antibodies generated in another species for use in humans would not work because the body would recognize them as foreign and remove/destroy them. I found this wiki article to be quite useful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monoclonal_antibodies
Antibodies generated in different animals/species are useful in the laboratory for immunoblotting and tagging proteins (which is what I do). Also I was reading about a new(er) treatment for cancer using antibodies produced in the lab (in some sort of human cells I would guess): http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/monoclonal-antibody/CA00082
Hope that helps.