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Antidepressants Boost Brain Growth

Discussion in 'Psychiatry' started by PublicHealth, Dec 21, 2005.

  1. PublicHealth

    PublicHealth Membership Revoked
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  3. MDgonnabe

    MDgonnabe your royal travesty
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  4. Poety

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    The study on rats, led by Vassilis E. Koliatsos, M.D., a neuropathologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, found that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increase the density of nerve-impulse-carrying axons in the frontal and parietal lobes of the neocortex and part of the limbic brain which control the sense of smell, emotions, motivation, and organs that work reflexively such as the heart, intestines and stomach. “It appears that SSRI antidepressants rewire areas of the brain that are important for thinking and feeling, as well as operating the autonomic nervous system,” said Koliatsos

    Now we see the EBM behind why SSRI's are excellent in preventing post MI complications :) I alwyas heard about it - but never knew why~

    Thanks PH!
     
  5. MDgonnabe

    MDgonnabe your royal travesty
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    the autonomic regulation might also be why the sexual side effect occurs.

    and the increased number of synapses might also be why wellbutrin decreases the seizure threshold.

    ah, so many side effects one could explain with all this... only question is: are these changes permanent given the nature of neuronal growth?
     
  6. Poety

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    good question - and if so - could this be why so many people are ultra sensitive to their discontinuance?
     
  7. MDgonnabe

    MDgonnabe your royal travesty
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    hmmm... do you think that ect could also be regenerating synapses? i mean that is the ultimate in depression therapy, no? perhaps the seizure induces minor neuronal damage that induces a repair pathway which regrows more axons or something. i mean it's kind of intuitive. how would seizures help change brain chemistry? makes more sense that they'd change the architecture of the brain itself...

    oh man. i really need to stop. i'm nerding out again. :D
     
  8. Poety

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    Your making me nerd out - and if they are regenerating, that would support what Sazi said in another thread about seizures being so closely related to bipolar - perhaps its all a matter of not too many/too many pathways - hmmm

    Thing is - I was under the impression that ECT needs to be repeated after the first 7 treatments. Like it only lasts for so long and then you have to repeat the treatment again (ie 7 times)

    My question would then be - if it regenerating like SSRI's, are these effects only short term? Do they grow the axons and then they regress again? Or is it that there is some genetic defect that causes these neuronal paths to regress - so no matter how many treatments you get they will keep degenerating even if you can cause them to regrow?

    :confused:
     

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