harveyking

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Hi, I am going to ask some faculty members in my college to write some recommendation letters. Can someone tell me if I should ask the teachers write the letters or type and print out the letters. Which is more formal? I am a little nervous for doing this. Also, can a Calculus professor write a recommendation letter for me? Thanks. :love:
 

Larsitron

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Are you asking if the letters should be typed? If so, the answer is yes. Any faculty member can write a letter for you so long as you think they will paint the best picture of you. However, the specific combination of letters depends on the school. Some will ask for only three, some for five.
 

Kazema

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I think a lot of schools ask for 2-3 science and like 1-2 non-science recommendations if you don't have a committee letter. I'm not sure what Calc would fall under; it's part of the BCPM calculation but it's not really a science class.

And yes, typed. No one has their recommenders write out letters. Or at least nobody I've ever heard of.

And yes, Macs rule.
 

carn311

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harveyking said:
Hi, I am going to ask some faculty members in my college to write some recommendation letters. Can someone tell me if I should ask the teachers write the letters or type and print out the letters. Which is more formal? I am a little nervous for doing this. Also, can a Calculus professor write a recommendation letter for me? Thanks. :love:

Certainly a Calculus professor is ok.


More importantly though I would find out if your school has a premed advisor. They not only provide a forwarding service for your letters of recomendation when you apply (ie they will copy them and send them on to each school) but they may have a premed board....

if they DO have a premed board then you pretty much need to have a composit letter from them. In order to get this letter you need to go through a predetermined process. (ie I need to show them my personal statement and 3 letters of rec. then THEY interview me and will offer a recomendation)

best of luck!!! Im in the middle of this myself
 

dewzen

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a prof. at a med school told me (after I had applied) that I should ask each prof. to kind of represent a different side of me, to get an overall, multi-dimensional picture of me. For example, if one class required a lot of laborious work and stuff, that prof could be like he was real dedicated to the cause, he had high commitment, and another class had a lot of group projects that prof would talk about how I work well with other students.
I dont know, take it for what it's worth
 

chlorineK

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When you ask these professors, make sure you give them relevant suporting documents (ie:transcript, lab work, thesis,resume, personal statment, etc.)- That way they have more than enough info. on you. I would prepare little folders for each recommender with this sort of information and include a stamped, addressed envelope to your premed office.

Also, I think it is important to have a rec from someone outside academics... like from a volunteer organization, your sports coach, or even a friend (many places like peer recs).
 

Suey

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chlorineK said:
When you ask these professors, make sure you give them relevant suporting documents (ie:transcript, lab work, thesis,resume, personal statment, etc.)- That way they have more than enough info. on you. I would prepare little folders for each recommender with this sort of information and include a stamped, addressed envelope to your premed office.

Also, I think it is important to have a rec from someone outside academics... like from a volunteer organization, your sports coach, or even a friend (many places like peer recs).
I have a question about that. A resume would provide a general overall view of one's ECs just as a list, but I feel like since I'm not describing any of my ECs, the recommenders don't get a better sense of who I am. I would like to describe my reasons for doing my ECs, etc, but that would be inappropriate for a resume format. Does anyone know of another way to present your ECs besides in a resume form? Or should I just stick with stick resume because that seems to be the standard? Any help is appreciated! =)
 

carn311

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Suey said:
I have a question about that. A resume would provide a general overall view of one's ECs just as a list, but I feel like since I'm not describing any of my ECs, the recommenders don't get a better sense of who I am. I would like to describe my reasons for doing my ECs, etc, but that would be inappropriate for a resume format. Does anyone know of another way to present your ECs besides in a resume form? Or should I just stick with stick resume because that seems to be the standard? Any help is appreciated! =)

Along with my CV (aka resume) i include a cover letter. Stating my intentions, some limited background, and my thanks for providing a recomendation.
 

Law2Doc

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chlorineK said:
Also, I think it is important to have a rec from someone outside academics... [...] even a friend (many places like peer recs).
I think you have to be very careful about this. While I'm sure there are places that like peer recs, there are definitely more places that frown on peer recs, and might see this as evidence that you couldn't get an LOR from your ECs, etc. Unless your friend is an alumnus of the place you are applying, I wouldn't risk it.
 

Larsitron

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Law2Doc said:
I think you have to be very careful about this. While I'm sure there are places that like peer recs, there are definitely more places that frown on peer recs, and might see this as evidence that you couldn't get an LOR from your ECs, etc. Unless your friend is an alumnus of the place you are applying, I wouldn't risk it.
I agree. Given that schools cap the number of letters between five and seven (some as few as three), you should be able to get more than enough professors, advisors, mentors, coaches, etc. to write them. No need to use one of your spots for a friend's letter.
 

chlorineK

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Fine point about peer recs- although I must say that two schools I applied to required a peer rec, so they are not frowned upon. Maybe this is only a good idea when you are an older, nontraditional applicant - I got a friend and former colleague to write mine and in interviews, I would get positive comments about my peer rec.

And I think a cover letter is a good idea, but hopefully you can sit down and chat with your recommender- this will give you enough time to highlight what is important to you.