Kobethegoat24

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Apr 27, 2017
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So I am going to be leaving my pharmacy tech job in a month to try to get clinical experience. I really need more time off the fall semester because i am taking difficult classes and can only work once a week. Any ideas on how to find any clinical jobs that allow for that kind of flexibility? I have been searching online job sites and have applied but only received one call but it was a twice a week opporunity.
 

DBC03

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So I am going to be leaving my pharmacy tech job in a month to try to get clinical experience. I really need more time off the fall semester because i am taking difficult classes and can only work once a week. Any ideas on how to find any clinical jobs that allow for that kind of flexibility? I have been searching online job sites and have applied but only received one call but it was a twice a week opporunity.
If you need experience, you could easily volunteer somewhere once a week for 4 hours or so. But if you need to get paid, I'm not sure. I know people who have scribed at the hospital - I wonder if you could take just one or two shifts if you apply to the right place. That will give you excellent clinical exposure and you might be able to put a lot of hours in just one day, leaving six days open.

I had to think through this going into this application cycle. I'm applying, but i definitely need to continue working on raising my GPA and getting more clinical volunteering in. In the end I chose to tutor for money - which pays significantly more than scribing or other clinical work and I set the schedule - and then I will volunteer with an emergency pregnancy clinic, which will give me both more clinical time and add more depth to activities I have already done in the past.
 
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Kobethegoat24

Kobethegoat24

2+ Year Member
Apr 27, 2017
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Pre-Medical
If you need experience, you could easily volunteer somewhere once a week for 4 hours or so. But if you need to get paid, I'm not sure. I know people who have scribed at the hospital - I wonder if you could take just one or two shifts if you apply to the right place. That will give you excellent clinical exposure and you might be able to put a lot of hours in just one day, leaving six days open.

I had to think through this going into this application cycle. I'm applying, but i definitely need to continue working on raising my GPA and getting more clinical volunteering in. In the end I chose to tutor for money - which pays significantly more than scribing or other clinical work and I set the schedule - and then I will volunteer with an emergency pregnancy clinic, which will give me both more clinical time and add more depth to activities I have already done in the past.
Thanks a lot for your answer
 
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Dr. Stalker

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Scribe - garbage pay, great "patient exposure"
Medical Assistant - no idea what the pay is, but I'm guessing pretty low, and you're not just documenting, depending on which clinic, you'll either just escort patients to waiting rooms, take vitals, or do a full H&P - great "patient exposure"
Pharm Tech (makes the most bank btw) - just doing stuff in the pharmacy, little/no patient contact, great pay.
 

DBC03

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I've heard Phlebotomy pays well, but I doubt it is flexible on the hours. I'll see if I can think of anything else!
 
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Kobethegoat24

Kobethegoat24

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Apr 27, 2017
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I've heard Phlebotomy pays well, but I doubt it is flexible on the hours. I'll see if I can think of anything else!
I actually applied to a Quest Diagnostic Phleb position that literally advertised Saturdays only and I was so happy when I applied but its been a week and I still haven't heard back. Any idea how long it takes them to respond to applications
 
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Kobethegoat24

Kobethegoat24

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Apr 27, 2017
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Scribe - garbage pay, great "patient exposure"
Medical Assistant - no idea what the pay is, but I'm guessing pretty low, and you're not just documenting, depending on which clinic, you'll either just escort patients to waiting rooms, take vitals, or do a full H&P - great "patient exposure"
Pharm Tech (makes the most bank btw) - just doing stuff in the pharmacy, little/no patient contact, great pay.
Thank you for answering but I work as pharmacy tech right now and its horrible lol. I get paid 12 an hour and the stress is insane, especially in retail
 

DBC03

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I actually applied to a Quest Diagnostic Phleb position that literally advertised Saturdays only and I was so happy when I applied but its been a week and I still haven't heard back. Any idea how long it takes them to respond to applications
That sounds like a nice position, but I unfortunately have no idea how long it takes to hear back. Did they require previous training? I was interested in getting into that, but I think my schedule is a little too crazy this year.
 
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Kobethegoat24

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Apr 27, 2017
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That sounds like a nice position, but I unfortunately have no idea how long it takes to hear back. Did they require previous training? I was interested in getting into that, but I think my schedule is a little too crazy this year.
They sent me a module to complete right after i applied but their application site didn't have any experience/certification/training requirement. I feel you on that, my schedule is preventing so many opportunities
 

Sjlucas15

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Apr 2, 2016
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So I am going to be leaving my pharmacy tech job in a month to try to get clinical experience. I really need more time off the fall semester because i am taking difficult classes and can only work once a week. Any ideas on how to find any clinical jobs that allow for that kind of flexibility? I have been searching online job sites and have applied but only received one call but it was a twice a week opporunity.
I highly recommend working as a nursing aide on a internal med floor. I work on a cardiology/ICU floor and I've been included in valuable experiences such as codes and emergent intubations. I can talk for hours on how crucial it is to have as much experience going into medical school. Where I work, everyone works together. I work 80% with nurses but 20% helping doctors with tests. 10/10 recommended!
 

DBC03

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I highly recommend working as a nursing aide on a internal med floor. I work on a cardiology/ICU floor and I've been included in valuable experiences such as codes and emergent intubations. I can talk for hours on how crucial it is to have as much experience going into medical school. Where I work, everyone works together. I work 80% with nurses but 20% helping doctors with tests. 10/10 recommended!
I can add that from my experience as a volunteer in the hospital, it seemed like the aides could work part time - and even possibly just once a week. They realize that many aides are working towards nursing or medical degrees and tend to work with odd schedules.
 
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Doctor-S

Grand Rounds
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@Kobethegoat24 when I was a pre-med undergraduate, I found employment at my university. At that time, the salary was good and I did not have to leave my school to drive to an off-campus job.

FWIW ... I was a paid tutor and I also worked as a paid laboratory assistant in a clinical lab (directly related to human medicine) on campus.

At my school, the clinical science departments and the medical school often advertised "paid" jobs to UG students.

Have you considered looking at your own school's employment postings (or at job postings at other schools near you)?
 
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Planes2Doc

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If you need the money, become a server or delivery driver. Don't get a clinical job. They have pretty intense schedule requirements, and they won't set you apart. When I took physics, my lab partner worked as an EMT. He would show up to lab half-asleep, and his grades took a hit.

You already mentioned the difficult academic course load, and that should be your number one priority. It's very difficult to fix bad grades if they fall, and I've seen a lot of people bite off more than they can chew with entry-level clinical jobs.

You best bet is once weekly volunteering. It's very flexible, and often you get downtime to study during your shifts anyhow.
 
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Govols22

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Nov 30, 2015
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I actually just got a job as an inpatient physical therapy aid and it's great. You really get a feel for how a hospital operates and you get a lot of patient interaction as you are helping PT's get their patients to do their exercises.
 
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Kobethegoat24

Kobethegoat24

2+ Year Member
Apr 27, 2017
196
92
Status
Pre-Medical
So I am going to be leaving my pharmacy tech job in a month to try to get clinical experience. I really need more time off the fall semester because i am taking difficult classes and can only work once a week. Any ideas on how to find any clinical jobs that allow for that kind of flexibility? I have been searching online job sites and have applied but only received one call but it was a twice a week opporunity.
If you need the money, become a server or delivery driver. Don't get a clinical job. They have pretty intense schedule requirements, and they won't set you apart. When I took physics, my lab partner worked as an EMT. He would show up to lab half-asleep, and his grades took a hit.

You already mentioned the difficult academic course load, and that should be your number one priority. It's very difficult to fix bad grades if they fall, and I've seen a lot of people bite off more than they can chew with entry-level clinical jobs.

You best bet is once weekly volunteering. It's very flexible, and often you get downtime to study during your shifts anyhow.
Great advice, thanks!
 
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Oct 28, 2015
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I recently finished up working as a hospitalist scribe through Scribeamerica at a community hospital and I'm realizing that it was like a perfectly tailor-made way to be exposed to inpatient medicine. Basically I worked 3 12-hour shifts per week (the hours sucked at first but I got used to it) and spent the day following the daytime hospitalist around, documenting each patient interaction as well as the doctor's assessment and plan, consultations with specialists, conversations with nursing staff and whatever else was relevant. The best part was that working multiple days in a row, you could follow a patient throughout their entire hospital stay starting with admission from the ER, and ending with discharge once they've hopefully improved. In this type of hospital there's usually a small number of doctors so I developed a strong relationship with each of them, and so we'd have days ranging from really busy seeing a number of sick ICU patients, to days where there weren't many patients, so the doctor, staff and I would just hang out (tbh it's possible I learned more from the docs those days than when we were actually seeing people). Couldn't recommend it highly enough if you can find a program near you!
 
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1203xx

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May 24, 2016
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I recently finished up working as a hospitalist scribe through Scribeamerica at a community hospital and I'm realizing that it was like a perfectly tailor-made way to be exposed to inpatient medicine. Basically I worked 3 12-hour shifts per week (the hours sucked at first but I got used to it) and spent the day following the daytime hospitalist around, documenting each patient interaction as well as the doctor's assessment and plan, consultations with specialists, conversations with nursing staff and whatever else was relevant. The best part was that working multiple days in a row, you could follow a patient throughout their entire hospital stay starting with admission from the ER, and ending with discharge once they've hopefully improved. In this type of hospital there's usually a small number of doctors so I developed a strong relationship with each of them, and so we'd have days ranging from really busy seeing a number of sick ICU patients, to days where there weren't many patients, so the doctor, staff and I would just hang out (tbh it's possible I learned more from the docs those days than when we were actually seeing people). Couldn't recommend it highly enough if you can find a program near you!

How long did you work there for?
 
Oct 28, 2015
19
34
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
How long did you work there for?
I worked there for 10 months during my gap year! Then I switched to ED in the same hospital, which was a good experience too but lacked some of the characteristics that made working on the hospital floor so great - I really only dealt with the initial patient interaction so there was way less continuity with patients, plus working with the same 3 docs all the time was hugely beneficial in the inpatient floor
 

Sjlucas15

2+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2016
30
33
Midwest
Status
Pre-Medical
I can add that from my experience as a volunteer in the hospital, it seemed like the aides could work part time - and even possibly just once a week. They realize that many aides are working towards nursing or medical degrees and tend to work with odd schedules.
Very true! I work 2 shifts every other weekend. The director of my department just met with me today to make sure I had my entire semester planned out with when exams are. Side note: all the nurses love the premeds choosing to work those jobs because it "humbles" the typical arrogant big-headed premed that thinks nurses just wipe butts!!
 
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