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I'm midway through a residency in Internal Medicine. I'm getting really fed of managing chronic diseases, I can't stand clinic and hate rounding/mental masturbation. I can't see myself doing this for the rest of my life. The more I think about it the more I miss the OR and doing procedures. I did anesthesia late in my 4th year of med school and am really contemplating finishing up this residency and applying to anesthesia. I've thought about Pulm/cc but don't like fighting losing battles and hate the poor outcomes, the burnout and the lifestyle. I've thought about trying to swap into a program to save a year but feel like it's too risky now and a little too late. Plus I'm guessing having already completed an IM residency I would be somewhat more competitive when applying to anesthesia. Looking for some insight or feedback from anyone who did two residencies. How does it work and what are the potential obstacles? Am I just thinking the grass is greener on the other side?
 

Cura_te_ipsum

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I'm midway through a residency in Internal Medicine. I'm getting really fed of managing chronic diseases, I can't stand clinic and hate rounding/mental masturbation. I can't see myself doing this for the rest of my life. The more I think about it the more I miss the OR and doing procedures. I did anesthesia late in my 4th year of med school and am really contemplating finishing up this residency and applying to anesthesia. I've thought about Pulm/cc but don't like fighting losing battles and hate the poor outcomes, the burnout and the lifestyle. I've thought about trying to swap into a program to save a year but feel like it's too risky now and a little too late. Plus I'm guessing having already completed an IM residency I would be somewhat more competitive when applying to anesthesia. Looking for some insight or feedback from anyone who did two residencies. How does it work and what are the potential obstacles? Am I just thinking the grass is greener on the other side?
My medical school advisor hated her initial medical specialty, finished the residency, practiced a few years, then did a second residency in another field. She loved it and retired last year after 25 years in her chosen field. Now in private practice. She was a nontrad medical student, so she was older for medical school, initial residency then her second residency. she was wonderful and is sorely missed. She was a big believer in following your dreams

Best wishes!
 

sluggs

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Give a real second look to Pulm/CCM or just straight CCM... not all of the battles are lost and some are even won.
Lots of procedures if you want, too.
 
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Apollyon

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My medical school advisor hated her initial medical specialty, finished the residency, practiced a few years, then did a second residency in another field. She loved it and retired last year after 25 years in her chosen field. Now in private practice. She was a nontrad medical student, so she was older for medical school, initial residency then her second residency. she was wonderful and is sorely missed. She was a big believer in following your dreams

Best wishes!
How old is she? Not to be indelicate, but, just to estimate, 25 for med school, finish at 29, first residency done 32, 2 years, 34, second residency, 37, 25 years later, 62, now in PP?

I am non trad (not by choice), grad med school at 31, just turned 47, and am ready to retire yesterday.
 

Cura_te_ipsum

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How old is she? Not to be indelicate, but, just to estimate, 25 for med school, finish at 29, first residency done 32, 2 years, 34, second residency, 37, 25 years later, 62, now in PP?

I am non trad (not by choice), grad med school at 31, just turned 47, and am ready to retire yesterday.
She started medical school in her 30s. I did not ask her her age. That's not my place.

research the names of Denton Cooley, MD and Michael DeBakey, MD. Their names should always be said while genuflecting and saying a Hail Mary. They practiced medicine (as heart surgeons) through their 90s. Dr Debakey died a few months before turning 100.

54-year-old medical student at Wake Forest School of Medicine is living her dream

If you're 47, you've got another 50 years.
 

Cura_te_ipsum

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Not me. I'm genetically inferior.
A woman at church today approached us after service. The woman is very elegant, classy and someone whom I admire greatly. She is pulling a 6 figure income, works in corporate business setting and declared she is ready to retire. That begged the question, "then what?" I said to her. She didnt have an answer. The grass is always greener, I told her.

So I ask you the same.

My friend at church would be magnificent in oncology as a volunteer bc her husband has been through cancer tx this past year, and she knows what cancer does to patients and their loved ones. She told me she didnt have a clue what she would do in retirement (she is 67) and really needed to think hard about it

She can do a lot more good making money and helping others financially rather than being retired, collecting a check and being bored.

Think about it. There are plenty of pnysicians who have done a career switch past their 40/50s. A friend of mine was a PD for an ER program and walked away after her divorce to join the army. She is now a flight surgeon, loving it and is quite an inspiration. She is in her late 50s

Anchors aweigh!
 

Apollyon

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A woman at church today approached us after service. The woman is very elegant, classy and someone whom I admire greatly. She is pulling a 6 figure income, works in corporate business setting and declared she is ready to retire. That begged the question, "then what?" I said to her. She didnt have an answer. The grass is always greener, I told her.

So I ask you the same.

My friend at church would be magnificent in oncology as a volunteer bc her husband has been through cancer tx this past year, and she knows what cancer does to patients and their loved ones. She told me she didnt have a clue what she would do in retirement (she is 67) and really needed to think hard about it

She can do a lot more good making money and helping others financially rather than being retired, collecting a check and being bored.

Think about it. There are plenty of pnysicians who have done a career switch past their 40/50s. A friend of mine was a PD for an ER program and walked away after her divorce to join the army. She is now a flight surgeon, loving it and is quite an inspiration. She is in her late 50s

Anchors aweigh!
I'm a poorly managed type 1 diabetic (my own fault). The chances of me living to even 80 are very slim. I am an innate slug. If I was independently wealthy, for sure if be retired. No question.
 

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There was an anesthesiologist where I did residency that had actually graduated from the gen surg residency there before going to do anesthesia. He'd wanted to do plastics but didn't match and really hated everything else so he finished gen surg and went and did an anesthesia residency. Seemed pretty happy with his decision.
 
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Winged Scapula

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There was an anesthesiologist where I did residency that had actually graduated from the gen surg residency there before going to do anesthesia. He'd wanted to do plastics but didn't match and really hated everything else so he finished gen surg and went and did an anesthesia residency. Seemed pretty happy with his decision.
We had someone do the same.

Also an internist who came back and did Urology.
 

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A woman at church today approached us after service. The woman is very elegant, classy and someone whom I admire greatly. She is pulling a 6 figure income, works in corporate business setting and declared she is ready to retire. That begged the question, "then what?" I said to her. She didnt have an answer. The grass is always greener, I told her.

So I ask you the same.

My friend at church would be magnificent in oncology as a volunteer bc her husband has been through cancer tx this past year, and she knows what cancer does to patients and their loved ones. She told me she didnt have a clue what she would do in retirement (she is 67) and really needed to think hard about it

She can do a lot more good making money and helping others financially rather than being retired, collecting a check and being bored.

Think about it. There are plenty of pnysicians who have done a career switch past their 40/50s. A friend of mine was a PD for an ER program and walked away after her divorce to join the army. She is now a flight surgeon, loving it and is quite an inspiration. She is in her late 50s

Anchors aweigh!
That is not what begging the question is

What you mean is raise the question
 
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BoardingDoc

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That is not what begging the question is

What you mean is raise the question
You are technically correct. That said, "begging the question" has become so widely misused that it is now accepted to mean "asks the question" in multiple references. Language evolves to suit society, regardless of how well educated that society is.
 

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You are technically correct. That said, "begging the question" has become so widely misused that it is now accepted to mean "asks the question" in multiple references. Language evolves to suit society, regardless of how well educated that society is.
So because every misinformed poster here says "yay or nay" we should start accepting that instead of "yea or nay"? I'd rather not look like a moron, thanks.
 

Cura_te_ipsum

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I'm a poorly managed type 1 diabetic (my own fault). The chances of me living to even 80 are very slim. I am an innate slug. If I was independently wealthy, for sure if be retired. No question.
You no doubt know far more than me re: T1D. My forte is T2D. However you stumped me wrt mortality in T1D. By coincidence I received my weekly email from Annals of IM and came across this linked 2016 study on your great challenge. Thanks for making me dig.

Chamberlain JJ, Kalyani RR, Leal S, Rhinehart AS, Shubrook JH, Skolnik N, et al. Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis of the 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Ann Intern Med. [Epub ahead of print 12 September 2017] doi: 10.7326/M17-1259

references this interesting article:
Mortality in Type 1 Diabetes in the DCCT/EDIC Versus the General Population.
"In conclusion, the long-term follow-up of the DCCT/EDIC T1D cohort shows that the overall mortality in T1D is similar to that of the general population. However, mortality in the DCCT conventional therapy group is somewhat higher than that in the general population. Further, in the overall cohort, relative mortality increases with increasing HbA1c, more prominently among females than males."


So because every misinformed poster here says "yay or nay" we should start accepting that instead of "yea or nay"? I'd rather not look like a moron, thanks.
Cupcake you look like a moron all on your own by being banned habitually, your constant snark and 9K+ comments in less than 3 years. Make some friends in the flesh (and Im not suggesting carnal knowledge but perhaps that too) dude.

Language is indeed a reflection of the vernacular utilization.
Stultus est licut stultus facit....It begs the question
 

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BoardingDoc

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So because every misinformed poster here says "yay or nay" we should start accepting that instead of "yea or nay"? I'd rather not look like a moron, thanks.
No, if people say "yay or nay" they should probably learn what a homophone is. Just like how you should point out when people say "I could care less" which literally means the opposite of the feeling they are trying to express (although I feel that this one is also slowly working its way into acceptable use which makes me crazy). You can say whatever you want. I'm just saying that choosing "begging the question" as your particular hill to die on is poor choice as there are now dictionaries backing the other side.
 

Apollyon

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No, if people say "yay or nay" they should probably learn what a homophone is. Just like how you should point out when people say "I could care less" which literally means the opposite of the feeling they are trying to express (although I feel that this one is also slowly working its way into acceptable use which makes me crazy). You can say whatever you want. I'm just saying that choosing "begging the question" as your particular hill to die on is poor choice as there are now dictionaries backing the other side.
Irregardless of your opinion, I think you are rediculous. Definately.

(See what I did there?)
 
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