NATO

10+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2009
78
0
Tacoma (WA)
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
UCF is going to be one of the PT schools that I'm going to apply to in the next cycle. It currently does not participate in PTCAS. Is anyone familiar with this school's program? In terms of FL PT schools, I keep on hearing about Mimai or St. Augustine, but nothing about UCF. I'm not sure if that's a 'red flag' for it not being a up-to-par program even though it is accredited.
 

jbizzle

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 19, 2008
811
28
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
UCF isn't that bad, the only Florida school I hear bad things about is FAMU. University of North Florida isn't bad either. I applied to UCF and was rejected the first time I applied in 2009. I just didn't bother applying there again this year because they didn't use PTCAS and I thought it would be a hassle for the PTs and professors writing my LORs to fill out multiple forms-they're already busy as it. And yes lots of apps go to UF, UM and USA which is the reason why you see more post about those three.
 
Last edited:
Jan 2, 2011
44
0
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
FlSurfer--it's too bad your friend doesn't like the program. It's a tough one to get in to. The "U Can't Fail" or "U Can't Finish" nicknames are from the early 80's.
I interviewed at UCF on Friday and was impressed with the facilities, the students and the faculty. I have a few friends who completed the SLP program there and they loved their program; one of my co-coaches teaches graduate physics there too.
The students that I met spoke highly of the program and of the open-door policy that the faculty have; they do require an 80% on all lab practicals to pass, which I think is pretty tough. PT students have 24 hour access to the building for study, they have new medical campus in another part of Orlando where they foresee great partnership, and they work with ORMC and Florida Hospital for research and classes. Actual patients come in for some of the courses too.
UCF receives 350-400 applications for 36 slots in the DPT program. As an in-state student and having done my undergrad at a large state university, I know that in-state residents usually look down upon their backyard university when the rest of the country admires it--very typical.
I think that once a program is accredited (the standards are the same), then it's a matter of where you feel comfortable as a student. Even if a school doesn't require an interview, I would make a campus visit and meet with some students. Sure, there are problems in every college or students who don't enjoy the program for various reasons. But in the end, a college education in any discipline is mostly about the effort and time that you, as a student, put into getting the most out of every class, faculty member and resource.