han14tra

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I have the choice between MD and DO. I respect both and I am considering both kinds of doctors seriously.

What is the AOA rotating internship? I plan to practice in PA, and I've read its required. I am going into EM or FM. Will this affect me and how?

I know for allopathic residencies, EM and FM are both 3 years. Would they be 4 for DOs?
 

DrMom

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If you're in a DO residency, your first year of residency is counted as the TRI
 

Taus

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It is extremely rare for DO's to do an extra year of training these days. It's probably not worth worrying about the details of how it works at this point in time.... just know that there are ways around it.

Bottom line: this should not be the deciding factor in which degree you pursue.
 

DrMidlife

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I have the choice between MD and DO. I respect both and I am considering both kinds of doctors seriously.

What is the AOA rotating internship? I plan to practice in PA, and I've read its required. I am going into EM or FM. Will this affect me and how?

I know for allopathic residencies, EM and FM are both 3 years. Would they be 4 for DOs?
The AOA rotating internship is integrated in most DO residencies. So if you do an AOA EM or FM residency, it's 3 years.

There are also some combined AOA/ACGME residencies, where the first year counts as the AOA rotating internship. 3 years. There are some of these in PA.

You only have a problem if you want to do an ACGME residency without also doing the work to get your first year of training approved by the AOA for PA.

See opportunities.osteopathic.org for details on particular AOA residencies.

See do-online.org for AOA bylaws and rule 42 exceptions etc.

See the pre-osteo FAQ for some really good material on why DO things are as they are and what it all means.
 

DrMom

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The AOA rotating internship is integrated in most DO residencies. So if you do an AOA EM or FM residency, it's 3 years.


Actually, all AOA EM residencies are 4 years. Approx 25% of ACGME EM residencies are 4 years.
 

Bacchus

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Also, I read on the boards (location unknown - either here or in Osteo) that almost all petitions for your first year in a ACGME residency to count for the rotational year are approved. However, like it was said, do not base your degree of this fact. If anything, you may have an additional year of training which, in my case, is reassuring because I have a "supervisor" over me. Now, of course, as a 4th year resident you're going to still have a lot of freedom. Additionally, I don't think that year of "lost" income is a big deal because it is trivial in the long run.
 

scpod

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Also, I read on the boards (location unknown - either here or in Osteo) that almost all petitions for your first year in a ACGME residency to count for the rotational year are approved....
IMHO, that's a poor statistic to even mention because there are quite a few stipulations...and those that don't meet them just don't apply for it. They're happy to work in the other 45 states.
 

Bacchus

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Just reporting what I've read.
 

group_theory

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The vast majority of those applying for Resolution 42 gets approved (percentage-wise is in the 90s). The exact number can be found in a JAOA article but it's thanksgiving and I'm too lazy to look it up.

Before this year (July 1, 2008), you needed an exceptional circumstances as part of the requirement for Resolution 42. That exceptional circumstances was granted 99% of the time. Hence starting this year (July 1, 2008), the exceptional circumstances requirement was eliminated.

So now to get your ACGME PGY1 year AOA approved via Resolution 42, you need to do the following

1. remain a member in good standing with the AOA
2. Either attend an AOA conference (or regional osteopathic conference, or osteopathic specialty college conference) or giving a presentation during your residency on something osteopathic.
3. Meet the rotation requirements.
http://www.osteopathic.org/pdf/sir_ogme1core.pdf
Check out the link - you can either meet the traditional rotating internship requirement OR the specialty-specific internship requirement.

If you meet all 3 - all you have to do is apply and your ACGME PGY1 year will be AOA-approved and you are eligible to get an unrestricted license in all 5 states that require an AOA-approved year.

People who run into trouble getting their Resolution 42 approved is usually due to curriculum requirements