May 9, 2019
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Hello!
I am at a practicum site where I often write portions of neuropsych reports but am not writing the entire thing. Does anyone know how much/which parts of a report must be written by me in order to count them as integrated reports in the APPI?
Thanks!
 
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I would think that you can only count the reports that you’re the signing clinician on (along with your supervisor’s signature).
 

AcronymAllergy

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APPIC defines an integrated report as: "...a report that includes a review of history, results of an interview, and at least two psychological tests from one or more of the following categories: personality measures, intellectual tests, cognitive tests, and neuropsychological tests."

My take: if you did not write all or most of the above sections, I would likely not count it among the integrated report total. For example, if you write up the history but the supervisor writes the results and impressions, I would probably not count it.

The spirit of asking the number of written integrated reports is to get a feel not just for how many measures a person has administered (which is captured elsewhere), but for their experience with cogently integrating all the various sources of information into a single report.

As WisNeuro mentioned, if you're writing it but then there are edits to your work, even if the edits are substantial, it would still count.
 

psych.meout

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APPIC defines an integrated report as: "...a report that includes a review of history, results of an interview, and at least two psychological tests from one or more of the following categories: personality measures, intellectual tests, cognitive tests, and neuropsychological tests."

My take: if you did not write all or most of the above sections, I would likely not count it among the integrated report total. For example, if you write up the history but the supervisor writes the results and impressions, I would probably not count it.

The spirit of asking the number of written integrated reports is to get a feel not just for how many measures a person has administered (which is captured elsewhere), but for their experience with cogently integrating all the various sources of information into a single report.

As WisNeuro mentioned, if you're writing it but then there are edits to your work, even if the edits are substantial, it would still count.
This is exactly what I've been told by multiple supervisors and psychologists. It's what separates a doctoral trainee from a psychometrist or psychiatric technician or other professional. Being able to integrate all the disparate information and results into an overall diagnostic picture and even make tangible recommendations based on that picture is what you should be learning and doing in practicum. Otherwise, you're not really getting all that much out of practicum.
 

LadyHalcyon

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Yes!!!! I really think so many programs do their students such a disservice by not focusing on assessment. The glaringly obvious fact they typically pay much more than therapy should be reason enough, but good assessment training and experience during graduate school is what sets apart an adequate clinician from a great one. Assessments are essential in teaching many of the most important skills a psychologist should possess: strong conceptualization skills; understanding when, why and with whom certain interventions should be used (should be linked to the conceptualization); differential diagnosis, perfecting the clinical interview, critical thinking, and scientific writing skills.

My opinion to every student is to seek out a variety of assessment training, even if you plan to only do therapy after you graduate.
This is exactly what I've been told by multiple supervisors and psychologists. It's what separates a doctoral trainee from a psychometrist or psychiatric technician or other professional. Being able to integrate all the disparate information and results into an overall diagnostic picture and even make tangible recommendations based on that picture is what you should be learning and doing in practicum. Otherwise, you're not really getting all that much out of practicum.
 
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Approximately how many integrated reports are sites looking to see?
It really depends on the site. Some sites specify a minimum (which I have seen range from 3-10). Some sites will also further specify that they want at least X amount of child or adult reports. Obviously assessment-focused sites will want to see more.
 
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ceswick
May 9, 2019
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Hi all! Thank you for your helpful replies. Because I am at a site with tiered supervision, I do testing and only get to sit in on half of the intake, so I write some background, behavioral observations, and test results. I do not always have an opportunity to write the summary. I am supervised by the attending and fellow, though, so I am part of the conceptualization, I am often just not writing it, particularly because of the quick turn around in a medical setting. I also have the opportunity to write reports through our university-based community clinic completely on my own. I just feel like I am putting a lot of effort into the reports at practicum and am getting a lot of good experience with writing and conceptualization, and I want my internship application to reflect that.
 

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If I weren't writing the summary, I would be very hesitant to count that among my integrated report total. I agree that participating in the conceptualization is certainly a good training experience (and is a crucial step toward what differentiates your training from what a psychometrist might do), although this is still notably different from writing everything up. You may be able to address this experience via your CV, cover letter, essays, and interview responses. It'll also be captured by your face-to-face assessment hours and numbers of measures administered.

Also, the training will likely be noticed by your internship supervisors, and will hopefully ease your transition into any assessment-heavy rotations.