Bacchus

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As many of us know, the 18th/19th MCAT scores from April have been released and some of us are in a "pickle" so to speak because we are torn on whether to apply early and be put on hold or apply once we get our scores back in order to be "fresh" on top of the pile.

I think there are two ways to view this situation.

1) We can submit early and be place on pre-look hold due to an incoming MCAT score. The benefits include being early and having your application possibly looked at despite the lack of a retake score. However, the cons seem very real. There is a high chance the the application may be misplaced or put on the bottom of a pile and never be looked at again. It seems a good way to counteract this would be calling each individual admission office in order to verify the new scores came in through AMCAS and that one's file is updated. But, how often will the admissions office make sure of this?

2) Do not submit the AMCAS application until the retake score comes in. The benefits include not having your file lost or misplaced. However, the con is that you were not "early" and then may face a limited number of seats.

Also, lets consider the effects on secondaries. You can prepare secondaries while you wait (by looking at previous questions) and submit them as soon as your AMCAS application is approved.

Thoughts/opinions? What is the best venue for this situation?
 

HumidBeing

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Oh, CHEAP! Like we wouldn't help you, if you weren't all modly? :laugh:

My vote is for early & use the new scores to update, but my advice on this matter is pretty worthless, since I haven't studied the issue enough. Just didn't want to zing you without making at least an attempt to answer your question. :D
 

Raryn

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You might get some of your secondaries even before your second scores come out (from the schools that don't screen). Don't think your file would be marked complete until they did though...
 

SketchLazy

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As many of us know, the 18th/19th MCAT scores from April have been released and some of us are in a "pickle" so to speak because we are torn on whether to apply early and be put on hold or apply once we get our scores back in order to be "fresh" on top of the pile.

I think there are two ways to view this situation.

1) We can submit early and be place on pre-look hold due to an incoming MCAT score. The benefits include being early and having your application possibly looked at despite the lack of a retake score. However, the cons seem very real. There is a high chance the the application may be misplaced or put on the bottom of a pile and never be looked at again. It seems a good way to counteract this would be calling each individual admission office in order to verify the new scores came in through AMCAS and that one's file is updated. But, how often will the admissions office make sure of this?

2) Do not submit the AMCAS application until the retake score comes in. The benefits include not having your file lost or misplaced. However, the con is that you were not "early" and then may face a limited number of seats.

Also, lets consider the effects on secondaries. You can prepare secondaries while you wait (by looking at previous questions) and submit them as soon as your AMCAS application is approved.

Thoughts/opinions? What is the best venue for this situation?
May 19th, 2008: MCAT scores and Primary applications are all done electronically

May 20th, 2008: papers and piles become obsolete

June 4th, 2008: MCAT or not, people who do not have any MCAT scores (or never had any MCAT scores on file) should still submit their application.

People who already have scores and aren't so happy about them should be the only ones considering submitting after taking an MCAT this year.
 

Gpan

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May 19th, 2008: MCAT scores and Primary applications are all done electronically

May 20th, 2008: papers and piles become obsolete

June 4th, 2008: MCAT or not, people who do not have any MCAT scores (or never had any MCAT scores on file) should still submit their application.

People who already have scores and aren't so happy about them should be the only ones considering submitting after taking an MCAT this year.
WHY?
 

SketchLazy

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For previous MCAT takers, AMCAS will not put your application on hold. They don't care if your score is too low or average, they will just send it off once it's your turn. When you submit in June, that means your application will be electronically sent to schools with the MCAT score you're unhappy with around the end of June or early July. When schools receive your application with an MCAT score, and they know you are retaking, they are the ones that will sit on your application until your new score comes in. It could be during the height of application season when this happens, and who knows if your application will ever get looked at again or in what light given your previous 'so-so' score. It's your call in that situation. But if you don't have any scores at all, AMCAS will put them on hold, until your scores come in and then automatically send your entire application off to all schools. No updates needed.
 

Nikki2002

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If you are comfortable turning in apps b4 you know your new score, then I would definitely get those apps in as early as possible, let them know you are retaking, and start calling the admissions offices as soon as the new scores are released.
 

Gpan

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For previous MCAT takers, AMCAS will not put your application on hold. They don't care if your score is too low or average, they will just send it off once it's your turn. When you submit in June, that means your application will be electronically sent to schools with the MCAT score you're unhappy with around the end of June or early July. When schools receive your application with an MCAT score, and they know you are retaking, they are the ones that will sit on your application until your new score comes in. It could be during the height of application season when this happens, and who knows if your application will ever get looked at again or in what light given your previous 'so-so' score. It's your call in that situation. But if you don't have any scores at all, AMCAS will put them on hold, until your scores come in and then automatically send your entire application off to all schools. No updates needed.
are you saying that the schools that have the applications on hold status might forget them? That seems very unprofessional to me. May I ask how do you know this?
 

ChubbyChaser

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hmmm imma go with option 1 and callling the schools individually to make sure they have your new mcat scores.
 

SketchLazy

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are you saying that the schools that have the applications on hold status might forget them? That seems very unprofessional to me. May I ask how do you know this?
By no means am I saying that they would forget. But I am saying that every time they look at your application and pass it up, your chances of getting an interview become smaller and smaller. Although I'm sure they look at all applications, when each school processes 6,000+ applications for interviews, it's easy to get brushed aside.
 

Gpan

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By no means am I saying that they would forget. But I am saying that every time they look at your application and pass it up, your chances of getting an interview become smaller and smaller. Although I'm sure they look at all applications, when each school processes 6,000+ applications for interviews, it's easy to get brushed aside.
If it was passed up due to a legitimate reason like waiting for a new updated score, then it shouldn't diminish the chance of an interview. It really sucks, but yeah anything can happen. BTW, just out of curiosity, where did you hear this? I really want your honest answer, so I can sort things out for my application. Thanks:)
 

Mobius1985

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2) Do not submit the AMCAS application until the retake score comes in. The benefits include not having your file lost or misplaced. However, the con is that you were not "early" and then may face a limited number of seats.

Thoughts/opinions?
Here is a middle-of-the-road strategy to consider: What about submitting early, but listing only one school (maybe a safety school). Then when you get the second score back, add the other schools that might consider you with that score. AMCAS will send out your application to those schools the next business day. If the second score is also subpar, you won't waste further application dollars on a fruitless cycle. If you are 'happy' vs 'thrilled' with the second MCAT, the schools you might add could vary significantly depending on the score. It would be more cost effective to target the schools who have admissions stats close to your best numbers (but including some Reach, and some Safeties, of course).
 

BoxingTheStars

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When do you plan to retake, and when will your new scores be out?

I wasn't able to submit my amcas until the 3rd week of July last cycle due to a transcript issue (i sent them w/o my last semester's grades accidentally, then when i resent them my school messed up and didn't send them for 3 weeks). I still recieved many early interviews and multiple acceptances this cycle so I really don't think it hurt me at most schools.

How bad is your first score? I really have no idea how schools deal with apps that say they plan to retake, but if it's not too bad then I can't see you getting screened out immediately. If it's less than, say 22, you might not want to take the chance of getting screened though and wait.

In sum, if you expect to get your scores back sometime in july I would just wait, as long as you have everything else ready to go and your transcripts are in. Are you dead-set on applying this year even if you don't get the score you want the second time? If you are going to apply anyway you may try what someone else said, and only apply to 1 school at first to get it processed, but if your new score might dissuade you from applying this cycle altogether I'd just wait for the new scores before you submit (you don't want to be a reapplicant if you don't have to be).
 

Gpan

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Here is a middle-of-the-road strategy to consider: What about submitting early, but listing only one school (maybe a safety school). Then when you get the second score back, add the other schools that might consider you with that score. AMCAS will send out your application to those schools the next business day. If the second score is also subpar, you won't waste further application dollars on a fruitless cycle. If you are 'happy' vs 'thrilled' with the second MCAT, the schools you might add could vary significantly depending on the score. It would be more cost effective to target the schools who have admissions stats close to your best numbers (but including some Reach, and some Safeties, of course).
This is what I will do:thumbup:
 
OP
B

Bacchus

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Here is a middle-of-the-road strategy to consider: What about submitting early, but listing only one school (maybe a safety school). Then when you get the second score back, add the other schools that might consider you with that score. AMCAS will send out your application to those schools the next business day. If the second score is also subpar, you won't waste further application dollars on a fruitless cycle. If you are 'happy' vs 'thrilled' with the second MCAT, the schools you might add could vary significantly depending on the score. It would be more cost effective to target the schools who have admissions stats close to your best numbers (but including some Reach, and some Safeties, of course).
I didn't even think of this, to be honest. I think this is what I'll end up doing. I can swallow losing $160 but hundreds of dollars, no.

To the person that asked if I must apply this cycle:
I will be applying DO as well but want to widen my chances instate.
 

Mobius1985

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This is what I will do:thumbup:
I didn't even think of this, to be honest. I think this is what I'll end up doing. I can swallow losing $160 but hundreds of dollars, no.

To the person that asked if I must apply this cycle:
I will be applying DO as well but want to widen my chances instate.
I used this strategy and it worked well for me. Good Luck.