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I've read that after a live/attenuated vaccine, when patient receives a blood transfusion or just immunoglobulins for some reason, vaccine must be repeated after few months, why is that?
 
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Goro

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dextor2003

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I've read that after a live/attenuated vaccine, when patient receives a blood transfusion or just immunoglobulins for some reason, vaccine must be repeated after few months, why is that?
My guess would be the immunoglobulins in the donated blood instead of the patient's blood will bind the vaccine antigens, so immunity won't be as strong otherwise. So you give them more antigens to expose their own immunoglobulins to develop a more robust immunity.
 
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_expecto__
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My guess would be the immunoglobulins in the donated blood instead of the patient's blood will bind the vaccine antigens, so immunity won't be as strong otherwise. So you give them more antigens to expose their own immunoglobulins to develop a more robust immunity.
that should be correct, assuming given immunoglobulins are taken from person vaccinated or a person with a history of a that particular disease, am i right?
 

PTPoeny

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We definitely do not re-vaccinated people after a blood transfusion.

Here is the CDC statement on vaccination after administration of immunoglobulin containing blood products:
General Recommendations for Vaccination & Immunoprophylaxis - Chapter 2 - 2018 Yellow Book | Travelers' Health | CDC

Summary is that MMR and varicella vaccinations may need to be repeated if given less than 2 weeks before immunoglobulins and need to be delayed for several months (exact length depends on product) after immunoglobulins.
 
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We definitely do not re-vaccinated people after a blood transfusion.

Here is the CDC statement on vaccination after administration of immunoglobulin containing blood products:
General Recommendations for Vaccination & Immunoprophylaxis - Chapter 2 - 2018 Yellow Book | Travelers' Health | CDC

Summary is that MMR and varicella vaccinations may need to be repeated if given less than 2 weeks before immunoglobulins and need to be delayed for several months (exact length depends on product) after immunoglobulins.
MMR and varicella are live/attenuated vaccines, thats my point. Only yellow fever and poliomyelitis taken PO, don't require re-vaccination from what i read in your cdc statement, thanks for that. but if you perform full blood transfusion to a kid recently vaccinated with MMR vaccine you must do it again, so your first sentence is too general.
 

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PTPoeny

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MMR and varicella are live/attenuated vaccines, thats my point. Only yellow fever and poliomyelitis taken PO, don't require re-vaccination from what i read in your cdc statement, thanks for that. but if you perform full blood transfusion to a kid recently vaccinated with MMR vaccine you must do it again, so your first sentence is too general.
Yes, a whole blood transfusion would require revaccination. But those are incredibly, extraordinarily rare. When you just say blood transfusion most people are going to think about pRBCs. pRBCs never require revaccination. The much more common scenario is that a kid gets IVIG or RIG or BabyBIG or VZIG and then their MMR/V vaccines have to be repeated or delayed.

All the immunoglobulin products are pooled from tons of donors so the assumption would be that every pool includes some of every common disease and vaccine. And yes, as mentioned above the immunoglobulins offer passive immunity so there may be ineffective activation of the patient's own immune system. Similar to the passive immunity provided by the mother during pregnancy.
 
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