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laurasanchezr

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I double majored in Biology (gpa 3.0) and in French Translation (3.4) my cumulative gpa is 3.2.

I havent yet taken the mcat but Im scoring 24 right now.
I shadowed somewhat, volunteered in EMS, and was part of some clubs at school.

What are my chances of being admitted to AUC?

Thank you
 

laurasanchezr

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Thank you for that link, i have done my research on caribben medical schools. My question was specific to AUC and the article does not address my question. What are my chances based on the information I provided.

thanks anyways though
 

loltopsy

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Your chances are pretty good, but your chances of getting a residency afterwards are poor.
 

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Your chances are pretty good, but your chances of getting a residency afterwards are poor.

Not really... (unless you think you're going to be a plastic surgeon).

-Skip
 

edgerock24

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Not really... (unless you think you're going to be a plastic surgeon).

-Skip

Agree. Caribbean grads match at ~50% in total; but the big 4 match rate is 90%+. If you can make it through a school like AUC, Ross, SGU, Saba, etc. with decent board scores, then you'll have a shot at that usual specialties that carib. grads match in.
 

loltopsy

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Agree. Caribbean grads match at ~50% in total; but the big 4 match rate is 90%+. If you can make it through a school like AUC, Ross, SGU, Saba, etc. with decent board scores, then you'll have a shot at that usual specialties that carib. grads match in.


Nope. Their match rate is closer to 50%. Their incoming class is about twice the size of those entering residency 4 years later. The attrition rate at all carib schools is very, very high by design.
 

laurasanchezr

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Nope. Their match rate is closer to 50%. Their incoming class is about twice the size of those entering residency 4 years later. The attrition rate at all carib schools is very, very high by design.

While I do agree that the attrition rate in general at manycaribbean schools is very high, it does not apply to each school individually. For example SGU has an attrition rate of 10%, AUC 13%, Ross and Saba 40-50%.

So since I know this is the case it concerns me more out of the people who complete the four years who gets residency, and AUC posts on their site its about 80% for their first year... I'm not sure about SGU I've been searching and can't find it. I don't trust their numbers very much since only the people that are guaranteed to pass the steps are allowed to actually go ahead and take it.. so its not taking into account the other students that completed the first 2 years and are not taking the steps or would have done poorly.


It is more difficult to attain more competitive residencies but its not impossible, in fact many students do place into many competitive residencies.

In any case, my main concern is just being accepted!! I'm pretty familiar with all the other info... I don't want to put this off any longer and would like to start this coming January. I'm taking the MCAT Sept 12.

I'm planning on improving my score by then, but in case i don't and I remain at a 24 my concern is what chances I would have then.

Thank you all so much for contributing :)
 
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Top Gun

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I think you could get into AUC, but why not just work on improving your GPA a little bit and getting a decent score on your MCAT and try for US schools (MD and DO)? You could even do a post-bac if you want better grades. Generally, you should try at least twice to get into a US school before considering the Caribbean. AUC, like the rest of the big 4, is a good school, but graduating from a US school will give you more options when it comes time to apply for residency.
 

loltopsy

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While I do agree that the attrition rate in general at manycaribbean schools is very high, it does not apply to each school individually. For example SGU has an attrition rate of 10%, AUC 13%, Ross and Saba 40-50%.

So since I know this is the case it concerns me more out of the people who complete the four years who gets residency, and AUC posts on their site its about 80% for their first year... I'm not sure about SGU I've been searching and can't find it. I don't trust their numbers very much since only the people that are guaranteed to pass the steps are allowed to actually go ahead and take it.. so its not taking into account the other students that completed the first 2 years and are not taking the steps or would have done poorly.


It is more difficult to attain more competitive residencies but its not impossible, in fact many students do place into many competitive residencies.

In any case, my main concern is just being accepted!! I'm pretty familiar with all the other info... I don't want to put this off any longer and would like to start this coming January. I'm taking the MCAT Sept 12.

I'm planning on improving my score by then, but in case i don't and I remain at a 24 my concern is what chances I would have then.

Thank you all so much for contributing :)

This has been discussed many times in previous topics. I'll just sum it up quickly by saying that you are trusting numbers they are publishing on their website. SGU had blog updates showing its ~1100 students at the white coat ceremony (year 1 of med school), and then a blog post showing graduation day with ~600 students.

Tons of people fail first year, fail second year, or fail step 1/2. Even if you manage to pass, you're stuck doing primary care even if you hate it. Assuming you get a spot. Things are getting more competitive every year with more and more people attending US med schools. By ~2015, the chances of matching into US residency from a carib school will start dropping very rapidly. There simply won't be any spots left over for IMGs.

I suggest you work your ass off and get your MCAT grades up. Then, do an SMP and absolutely rock it. If you can get into the range for a DO school, you're set. You're virtually guaranteed to match into something, and you can match into any specialty you enjoy (although NSG/Plastics type of specialty would be an uphill battle).

Good luck.
 

Top Gun

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This has been discussed many times in previous topics. I'll just sum it up quickly by saying that you are trusting numbers they are publishing on their website. SGU had blog updates showing its ~1100 students at the white coat ceremony (year 1 of med school), and then a blog post showing graduation day with ~600 students.

Tons of people fail first year, fail second year, or fail step 1/2. Even if you manage to pass, you're stuck doing primary care even if you hate it. Assuming you get a spot. Things are getting more competitive every year with more and more people attending US med schools. By ~2015, the chances of matching into US residency from a carib school will start dropping very rapidly. There simply won't be any spots left over for IMGs.


Good luck.


While I agree with a significant portion of your post, I don't think its entirely true that you get stuck doing primary care if you graduate from a Caribbean school. SGU grads have managed to match into other specialties like general surgery, anesthesiology, OB/Gyn, or emergency medicine. Sure, you probably won't get plastics or derm, but you're not necessarily limited to practicing family medicine out in the middle of nowhere. Also, as to 1100 students being present at the white coat ceremony and 600 of them appearing on graduation day, how many of that original class actually graduated later? Some students at SGU do decel, and the graduation date occurs at a later time.
 

loltopsy

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While I agree with a significant portion of your post, I don't think its entirely true that you get stuck doing primary care if you graduate from a Caribbean school. SGU grads have managed to match into other specialties like general surgery, anesthesiology, OB/Gyn, or emergency medicine. Sure, you probably won't get plastics or derm, but you're not necessarily limited to practicing family medicine out in the middle of nowhere. Also, as to 1100 students being present at the white coat ceremony and 600 of them appearing on graduation day, how many of that original class actually graduated later? Some students at SGU do decel, and the graduation date occurs at a later time.

I'm saying realistically, you'd probably doing primary care. I'm not saying other specialties don't happen, just much less likely.

And, like you said, many students decel. Let's say the entering class of 2010 had 1000 people and some of those decel'd. The entering class of 2009 then had students decel to become effectively 'class of 2010'. You would expect the numbers to roughly balance out so that the number of students graduating in 2014 wouldn't change significantly.

You still lose a ton of people (something like half) from white coat to graduation.
 

Medstart108

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While I agree with a significant portion of your post, I don't think its entirely true that you get stuck doing primary care if you graduate from a Caribbean school. SGU grads have managed to match into other specialties like general surgery, anesthesiology, OB/Gyn, or emergency medicine. Sure, you probably won't get plastics or derm, but you're not necessarily limited to practicing family medicine out in the middle of nowhere. Also, as to 1100 students being present at the white coat ceremony and 600 of them appearing on graduation day, how many of that original class actually graduated later? Some students at SGU do decel, and the graduation date occurs at a later time.

While it is possible its still very unlikely. If you had 1000 students you might end up with 3 or 4 in general surgery and 4 or 5 in anesthesiology so overall maybe 25-30 people would not be in primary care.

If you look at it from that point of view, 1/33 would end up in something other than primary care. Granted i just guessed these stats on the spot, but my point is that whether its 1/8 or 1/33 the chances are too low to really expect anything other than being grateful you matched into primary care.
 
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