erg923

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Is there any document that has the "average" Ph.D funding stipend. Maybe at least a range for "fully funded" programs?

10-15 years ago I want to say an "average" might have been around 20k?
 

acclivity

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Is there any document that has the "average" Ph.D funding stipend. Maybe at least a range for "fully funded" programs?

10-15 years ago I want to say an "average" might have been around 20k?
Could you modify this to make it into a poll?
 

futureapppsy2

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I graduated in 2016, and my stipend was $20k a year, not including funding for two conferences a year. A year or two ago, the stipends went up to $25k a year, IIRC.
 

MamaPhD

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10-15 years ago I want to say an "average" might have been around 20k?
Mine (within that time period of 10-15 years ago) was a little under 20K. I don't recall the exact amount.
 

AcronymAllergy

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No clue what they're at now, but I'd be interested to see if there's a survey somewhere as well. I'd imagine upper-teens to low-20's would be a good guess. Mine ranged from low- to upper-teens from 10-15 years ago, depending on whether it was TA, RA, or clinical practicum funding.
 

Fan_of_Meehl

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Is there any document that has the "average" Ph.D funding stipend. Maybe at least a range for "fully funded" programs?

10-15 years ago I want to say an "average" might have been around 20k?
When I was in grad school in the mid-late 90s they paid us a around 11k/yr. (or maybe it was 9k) and I remember some fellow grad students did some investigation into food stamps and other forms of welfare only to discover that our stipend placed us *just barely above* the level that would allow us to apply for food stamps and other forms of assistance. So I would imagine that the formula of 1.01 x [income that would qualify for food stamp assistance in your state] would be a good guess.
 

szymk1sm

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I think mine started out at $15k (in 2012) and then the department bumped all stipends up to $20k the following year (or maybe it was $18k then $20k). A lot of students were on NIH funding of some kind, so I think stipends were $22-23k for those...
 

jdawg2017

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FWIW - mine currently is 33k / yr (one of the most expensive cities in the country). NIH F31s from what I’ve learned pay 25k / yr, though people at my school on Fs get cost adjustments from the university to make it back to 33k. Even rooms in 3/4 bed places go for north of $1000/mo around here.

This is definitely not the norm. Most programs in cheaper places are in the 24-28k range.
 

Indiana_Jane0411

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22 K-ish (base + fellowship). We also get yearly travel money and research funds for our time in the program. Low COL area.


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Ollie123

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Graduated a little over 4 years ago (wow it feels like much longer than that...) and we got about 19k in a relatively low-modest COL location (had a very nice 2 bedroom for $820/mo). Highest I saw back then was upper 20s.

Fellowships and the like bumped it up and you could ocassionally double dip (e.g. I got double funding for a semester when I was scheduled to teach, got an external fellowship at the last minute and they agreed it was better to pay me extra than try to find a new instructor 3 days before the semester started).

I dont get the impression grad stipends have gone up much. Which is a little frustrating given how much I now pay research staff, though I guess on a per hour basis it wouldnt be that far off.
 
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erg923

erg923

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Ugh...ok.

So no document with the info? And "average" may not be good/representative metric? Got it. Thanks all who chimed in.
 

modestmousktr

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I'm also in one of the highest COL areas in the country with one of the greatest wealth divides, so the stipend is abysmal considering. When I was funded through a fellowship, I had 24,000, but typically I'm funded through GSR/TA positions, and that's 22,000. Rent is $1500. If this was a different area of the country, I would consider the stipend generous.
 

Psycycle

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$9000, low cost of living area. But clearly a factor in why I left with too much debt and why I'm fortunate to have had EDRP.
 

psych.meout

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And this is just one of the many reasons why we need to unionize grad students.
 

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ClinicalABA

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At my alma mater institution it’s currently $21,728.40 per year (2 semesters) for 20 hour/week TA/RA position. Half of that is minimum required to receive tuition waiver. The CBA has 2.5% increases per year.

It’s probably public info for state schools. I googled “StateU grad student stipend”
 

ClinicalABA

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And this is just one of the many reasons why we need to unionize grad students.
We were (they still are) unionized as grad students. We were actually part of the United Auto Workers! The folks in the pictures in the newsletter DID NOT look like intro to psych TAs!
 

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Psycycle

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We were (they still are) unionized as grad students. We were actually part of the United Auto Workers! The folks in the pictures in the newsletter DID NOT look like intro to psych TAs!
We were unionized also.
 
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Stipend at my program has been 14k for a 9-month TA/RA for decades without ever adjusting despite the cost of living increasing. My city was traditionally a low COL city, but rent has recently seen a spike. The department finally gave us all a 1.5k raise (so our salary is 15.5k for 9 months), but IMO that's still not enough, especially considering we don't even have dental or vision insurance. I've been one of the luckier ones because I had NIH funding and guaranteed funding over the summer, but many students in my program find themselves scrambling for funding during the summer.

Recently a graduate student union started at my university and they're calling for a more livable wage, benefits (e.g., dental and vision insurance), and overall action against the exploitation of graduate student TAs and RAs. I truly hope they're able to see some results and affect some positive change.
 

foreverbull

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$12k/year stipend for an assistantship in my program for a highly-coveted spot; several assistantships offered less than that (i.e. $750-800/month). Didn’t cover living expenses even in a somewhat low cost-of-living metro area 6-8 years ago.
 
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When I was in grad school in the mid-late 90s they paid us a around 11k/yr. (or maybe it was 9k) and I remember some fellow grad students did some investigation into food stamps and other forms of welfare only to discover that our stipend placed us *just barely above* the level that would allow us to apply for food stamps and other forms of assistance. So I would imagine that the formula of 1.01 x [income that would qualify for food stamp assistance in your state] would be a good guess.
Thats really ****ty :(
 
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$26k for GSR/TA-related stipend at a very high COL part of the country. This is for the 10 month year. There are some opportunities to TA over the summer to get additional funds (~1800/month).
 

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For those with higher stipends is it based on funding/research, etc or guaranteed money? I had higher offers that were not a guarantee for all years vs my program that did guarantee funding for all years enrolled.
 
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For those with higher stipends is it based on funding/research, etc or guaranteed money? I had higher offers that were not a guarantee for all years vs my program that did guarantee funding for all years enrolled.
We were guaranteed around $24k a year for GSR/TA positions. Because cost of living is so high, they usually top us off to $26k for the 10-month year.


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Sheeshtopher

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Is there any document that has the "average" Ph.D funding stipend. Maybe at least a range for "fully funded" programs?

10-15 years ago I want to say an "average" might have been around 20k?
PhD chem. 22K/year in Richmond, VA. Different though since I was fully funded by my PI as a research assistant - did not have to TA.
 

ClinicalABA

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For those with higher stipends is it based on funding/research, etc or guaranteed money? I had higher offers that were not a guarantee for all years vs my program that did guarantee funding for all years enrolled.
TA guaranteed first 3 years, but anyone who needed it basically got it for fourth year (back in the stone ages, most of us went on internship after fourth year. After 2nd year, most of us had paid practicum that qualified us for tuition waiver, and also were funded as RAs through our mentor’s labs. Rare to TA in 3rd-4th year unless you wanted to. There were always more TA slots than grad students who needed/wanted to do them. Summer funding was available if needed through internal and external practicum.
 

acclivity

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PhD students at my institution are guaranteed a little over $15k for 12 mos. for the first 4 years (i.e., ~$1k/month after taxes) -- Funding has remained static for the last 20 years, and has in fact been effectively reduced over recent years (e.g., students now have to pay fees when they didn't before, parking is no longer covered, travel funding has been reduced). Like someone else mentioned, funding at my institution places graduate students just slightly north of the cutoffs for public assistance. Our program handbook forbids students from working outside the university, but I'm not sure how enforceable that policy is, and most faculty look the other way so long as milestones are being met on time and there aren't other concerns (e.g., self care).

We also pay FICA, which frustrates me because in a recent court ruling regarding student unionization graduate students were classified as non-employees (i.e., Grad student unions dealt blow as proposed new rule says students aren’t ‘employees’), but here we are paying FICA.
 
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beginner2011

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I'm currently on internship, and was fully funded throughout my graduate training. Our annual stipend started in the $23k-$25k range, and increased up to $25k-$27k as we completed program milestones. There was also substantial travel funding available from the dept for conference attendance (~$1k annually), and many students were able to gain external funding for any additional research-related costs they had.

I was located in a major metro area where the median rent for a 1BD apartment was >$1,000. We also had ~$150 per month of student fees that needed to be paid. It was tight, but most students were able to make ends meet on just the stipend by finding shared housing and living frugally without taking on student loans.
 

student til 30

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18k from a university fellowship and ~22k from the HPSP scholarship. Still didn't go that far in a high COL area, but lived much better than most.
 

WisNeuro

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I think I was about 18k for 9 months in a low CoL area. I also worked for a large research project outside of my program that paid well, as well as an evaluator for an RCT for a project within my program. So, very busy, but fairly well off financially with that and good budgeting.
 

psych.meout

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About $16,000 for 9 months with some extra money for teaching in the summer.

It hurt my wallet a bit to attend this program (even though the match is perfect and grad school has been great), because I received an offer for $26,000 for 9 months from another program with similar CoL.
 

calimich

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Graduated a little over 4 years ago (wow it feels like much longer than that...)
same here!

my stipend was about 22k in a med-low COL area. My partner and I had been DINKs, so the relative income hit was substantial. In addition to my TA responsibilities, we both worked odd jobs that first year (we submitted 8 W-2s come tax time, 5 were my partner's). Census worker. Substitute teacher. YMCA instructor. Bakery worker. Independent research assistant. Non-profit worker.

As the years progressed I always kept a small part time gig (teaching 1 class at CC or working as a MA level clinician) to supplement TA money and my partner found a good stable job in year 2.
 
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erg923

erg923

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Thanks everyone! I am appreciative of the responses. I was not aware of such a range for so-call "fully funded" programs. I am somewhat shocked to hear such a low stipend for some program, as well as how little it really has has grown in 15 years. For some comparison, the federal GS-13 step one has been raised almost 18K in the last 15 years.
 
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futureapppsy2

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Thanks everyone! I am appreciative of the responses. I was not aware of such a range for so-call "fully funded" programs. I am somewhat shocked to hear such a low stipend for some program, as well as how little it really has has grown in 15 years. For some comparison, the federal GS-13 step one has been raised almost 18K in the last 15 years.
Fwiw, my living expenses were very low in grad school and I never felt pressed for money. Plus I was double-funded my first year and so started a nest egg. Postdoc in a high COL city on the other hand...
 

WisNeuro

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Thanks everyone! I am appreciative of the responses. I was not aware of such a range for so-call "fully funded" programs. I am somewhat shocked to hear such a low stipend for some program, as well as how little it really has has grown in 15 years. For some comparison, the federal GS-13 step one has been raised almost 18K in the last 15 years.
I'm not shocked at all. Stipend, tuition waivers, insurance, etc, makes grad students somewhat expensive for what they bring in monetarily. And, with federal and state monies that go to higher ed dropping year over year, what alternative is there?
 

ClinicalABA

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I'm not shocked at all. Stipend, tuition waivers, insurance, etc, makes grad students somewhat expensive for what they bring in monetarily. And, with federal and state monies that go to higher ed dropping year over year, what alternative is there?
One alternative has been to simply take less students into funded programs. My old school was taking 6-7 per cohort around the beginning of the century, and now it looks like they take more like 4-5 per cohort, with recent years only taking 2 or 3. Funding hasn't kept up with inflation a, but it has risen reasonably.
 

WisNeuro

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One alternative has been to simply take less students into funded programs. My old school was taking 6-7 per cohort around the beginning of the century, and now it looks like they take more like 4-5 per cohort, with recent years only taking 2 or 3. Funding hasn't kept up with inflation a, but it has risen reasonably.
Considering the saturation of the market and declining jobs in certain areas (e.g., therapy jobs in institutional settings), smaller cohorts could be a good thing.
 

Sanman

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Considering the saturation of the market and declining jobs in certain areas (e.g., therapy jobs in institutional settings), smaller cohorts could be a good thing.

Mine ended up cutting students and increasing stipends as well. This happened around the time of internship crisis as students often needed more time and resources to for them to maintain their internship match percentages.