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AVMA Accredited Vs. AVMA Listed schools

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by Bullettime, May 12, 2007.

  1. Bullettime

    Bullettime New Member 10+ Year Member

    70
    0
    Mar 27, 2006
    Toronto
    Ok so here's a question that is for now, causing some confusion in my mind.
    An AVMA accredited school (as in the Schools in the US, Canada, 3 Australian, 1 NZ and the Schools in England and Scotland) will have their graduates just undertake the NAVLE, and then they would have to pass their provincial/state exam to gain licensing there. Am i on the right page thus far?
    An AVMA listed school graduate would have to undertake the NAVLE (we qualify to take this right, we won't need to take the Qualifying Examination (QE) right??), and then take the CPE (Clinical Proficiency Exam) whenever it is held, and then gain licensing in where we want to practice....right?
    Does that procedure seem to make sense to those of you who know about it/have undergone it/know of people that have done it?
    Really want to get this straight, in case i do want to come back and practice at home. This more so relates to practicing in Canada (where it is governed by the NEB (National examining board)), but any input on practicing in other places in the US and Canada would be greatly appreciated!!!
    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. aggiegolf

    aggiegolf 2+ Year Member

    127
    1
    Apr 1, 2007
    Hello. I am a veterinary student at St. Matthew's University (AVMA listed) so hopefully I can help you out a bit.


    Your question: An AVMA accredited school will have their graduates just undertake the NAVLE, and then they would have to pass their provincial/state exam to gain licensing there. Am i on the right page thus far?


    Answer: That's correct. Once you graduate from an AVMA accredited university, the remaining steps are the NAVLE and state boards (or the board exam to practice in a province of Canada).


    Your question: An AVMA listed school graduate would have to undertake the NAVLE (we qualify to take this right, we won't need to take the Qualifying Examination (QE) right??), and then take the CPE (Clinical Proficiency Exam) whenever it is held, and then gain licensing in where we want to practice....right?


    Answer: Regardless of whether you attend an AVMA accredited school or not, everyone has to take the NAVLE if they wish to practice in North America. Now listen closely, because this is where it gets complicated:

    As an AVMA listed graduate, you WILL be required to tak the QE (PAVE program) and the clinical proficiency examination. The ECVFG program recently added the Basic and Clinical Sciences Examination (BCSE) as a requirement. After you pass the BCSE, you can move on to the clinical examination.

    Typically, you have to complete these examinations before being allowed to sit for the NAVLE. The foreign licensing process can sound intimidating at first, but if you study the websites it's pretty straightforward. More information about ECVFG can be found at http://www.avma.org/education/ecfvg/bcse_bulletin.asp.



    I have several Canadian classmates at St. Matthew's University. Everyone who is here has every intention on returning to their home to practice. In fact, that is one of the agreements the school made with the Cayman Islands government. They train us to return home, not to remain in this foreign country.


    The bottom line is this: If you're given the opportunity to study at an AVMA accredited school, go for it. But if you are rejected like all of us were, you can still gain access to an incredible veterinary education. I study every single day, so I know I'm getting my money's worth. Whether you go to SMU, SGU, or Ross, you won't have a problem passing the QE, CPE, NAVLE, and state/provincial boards. The upperclassmen had a practice licensing examination this morning actually. This way, you can see which areas you are weak in and study up before test time.


    Anyway, there's my two cents. Alot of you guys on here know who I am and I promised to update you once I arrived at St. Matthew's. All I can say is that it's amazing. The island is great, the school is great, and the education is great. I think the AVMA vets and the caribbean vets are going to make an awesome team.


    Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Have a great day!!!!
     
  4. blkizs

    blkizs 2+ Year Member

    12
    0
    Apr 3, 2007
    what is the clinical proficiency examination? is that part of PAVE? I was reading the website and saw something like that but thought you only needed to do that part if you didnt pass the QE before you went to your clinicals.

    Doesnt it cost about $5,000, making PAVE expensive like the ECFVG? I could be totally wrong but just want to clarify because it's confusing.thanks
     
  5. AuburnPreVet

    AuburnPreVet AU CVM Class of 2011 5+ Year Member

    295
    0
    Nov 10, 2004
    Podunk
    Aggie,

    Does SMU matriculate multiple times a year like Ross/SGU? IE, did you start in the Summer? That's neat. G'Luck.
     
  6. aggiegolf

    aggiegolf 2+ Year Member

    127
    1
    Apr 1, 2007

    Both the PAVE and ECVFG have a clinical evaluation examination. Regardless of which route you take, you will be tested on your clinical skills (surgery, radiology, anesthesia, etc.). Yes the PAVE is around 5000 making it similar to the cost of ECVFG, although I constantly hear people say the ECVFG is more expensive (I don't know what they are basing this on).


    At the caribbean veterinary schools, your final year, or fourth year, of veterinary school is done in the US. It's called the clinical year. This does not, however, exempt you from taking the CPE. You have to take it unless you attend an AVMA accredited school.


    SMU matriculates 3 times a year like Ross. Ross and SMU are on the trimester program, but SGU follows the US system (ie no summer school). So they form twice a year. I started my first semester in May. I like going year round b/c I stay fresh on the material. And you have 2 weeks off in between each semester which is nice.


    The only thing I really dislike about this school is that it's very small and therefore you hear tons of rumors every week. Some students are very disappointed with the program, but so far I think it's great. We're already learning the basics of radiology because that tends to be the area that caribbean students have the most difficult time in during clinical rotations. So they're constantly adding tidbits to our studies to ensure that we are prepared to jump in with you guys in the states.


    It hasn't been posted on the school website yet, but we now have an affiliation with the University of Minnesota. Hopefully by the time I enter clinicals they will have an affiliation somewhere down south closer to home!


    Good luck everyone!
     

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