Before you decided on medicine, what other careers were you thinking about?

ResIpsa

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 25, 2005
13
0
Status
As a non-trad, I'm still going back and forth over whether medicine is truly the right next career for me (law was the first.) For you non-trads, what other careers (medical and non-med related) were you thinking about once you decided to leave your last career, and what factors made you decide on medicine instead of those careers? For instance, my other career choices that I'm currently pondering are a PhD in clinical psych, an MPH, and a MA in genetic counseling. I'm also considering a career in academic affairs (like career counseling or dean of students type positions.)
 

Anastasis

caffeinated for safety
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2005
9,817
4
TX
Status
Attending Physician
I was looking into Social Psyc or Cultural Psyc grad programs and then teaching or working for the CIA (yup that's right.) or doing my PhD in Religious Studies (in either Judaism or Early Christianity) and then teaching university.

I also played around with doing full-time peace and reconciliation work when I first moved overseas (I live in Belfast) - but I don't think it's a good fit for me.
 

gaki

needs help
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2004
183
0
hi
Status
Medical Student
I was doing sporradic work in animation production and art and some freelance illustration... I was thinking about going into psychology Phd (I like the scientist-practitioner thing.. but right now I am verily leaning towards medical school.. ideally I'd want to be a psychitrist scientist-practitioner, but I don't know how practical that is since I am getting into it so late :(
 

eralza

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2004
355
3
51
Virginia
Status
Medical Student
I wanted to be a fighter pilot or own a bakery
 

Febrifuge

Grizzled Old Newcomer
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 7, 2003
1,520
22
febrifuge.blogspot.com
Status
Non-Student
I know what you mean -- as older people, we've been through a period where either we thought we had it figured out, or else we came to be at least somewhat comfortable with the idea that life goes on even if you never figure it out. So it's a little different from the process that a 19-year-old goes through, to find that one career path they intend to be permanent. Kind of like getting married for the 2nd time. :D

I worked in home loans, and then in higher ed. Mostly I held down a "day job" so as to subsidize a comfortable life, and figured I might work out my one true purpose sometime later. Maybe it would be cooler if I could relate a story of being driven and focused in some other area, which despite all my success turned out to be hollow, and so I switched to medicine. Really, it's a quieter version of that.

Bottom line, medicine means something to me; always has, always will. Now that I'm older, it's sunk into my thick skull that that is the important principle for me. Therefore, it's time to do it right.
 

Em&M

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 12, 2004
48
0
Status
Right before I started my job in medical research, I was offered a position as a pharmaceutical rep with one of the most well-known companies out there. The pay was out of this world, I could use my science degree and there would have been tremendous opportunity for growth. The negative aspect was that the territory that I was offered was in a very rural area and it would have meant moving my daughter and myself somewhere that we had no support network. Aside from that, perhaps the biggest deciding factor in my not taking the job was the absolute, overwhelming, throbbing deep down feeling that I wouldn't be able to call on physicians every day and bug them to buy my product if only because I would want to stay at the clinic or hospital and be doing their job! I felt that I would be more interested in what their patients were up to and what was going on clinically than I would be with the product that I was trying to peddle. That thought kept haunting me day and night for weeks while I was going through the interview process and eventually deciding on the position.

I never found that hunger to sell or become successful in that type of work. I think that was really the turning point in my life; when I knew that I was meant to go in a whole new direction. So I did. I turned down the offer, much to the chagrin of my father who just wanted me to succeed and my grandma who was sick of her "smartest grandchild" wasting her talent but, luckily, I was immediately offered a full time position at the University, in the Department of Medicine even, and the rest is history. I will be applying to med school, fingers crossed, next app. cycle.

Good Luck Everybody!