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Bio Questions

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Lonely Sol, May 11, 2007.

  1. Lonely Sol

    Lonely Sol cowgoesmoo fan!
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    Hey I had couple of questions for bio section that I wasnt sure about, if anyone could clarify for me, that would be appreciated!

    1. Do enzyme make rxn proceed, even if they wouldnt take place normally?!

    2. What is the purpose of centrosome in plant cells?
    --I know they don't have centrioles, but is it because centrosome help form microtubules that will separate chromosomes.

    3. Can anyone sum up RFLP, I read up on it, but its just a little confusing?!

    *Thanks guys, really appreciate your help!
     
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  3. BodybldgDoc

    BodybldgDoc Guest

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    1. No
    2. Centrosome also called the "microtubule organizing center" a small body located near the nucleus, it has a dense center and radiating tubules. The centrosomes is where microtubules are made. During cell division (mitosis), the centrosome divides and the two parts move to opposite sides of the dividing cell.
    3.
    Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) is a technique in which organisms may be differentiated by analysis of patterns derived from cleavage of their DNA. If two organisms differ in the distance between sites of cleavage of a particular restriction endonuclease, the length of the fragments produced will differ when the DNA is digested with a restriction enzyme. The similarity of the patterns generated can be used to differentiate species (and even strains) from one another.
     
  4. Lonely Sol

    Lonely Sol cowgoesmoo fan!
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    Thanks body, I hope I do better this time around thats why I am not going to leave anything for chance!! Study everything like its important!! (especially for math)!
     
  5. BodybldgDoc

    BodybldgDoc Guest

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    I agree man. I'm gonna read my entire physiology text hoping that I cover those experimental questions somewhere in there.
     
  6. Decan

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    I think this depends...the way you have phrased the question, I would say yes. Enzymes speed up reactions by lowering the energy of activation. For example, 2 nucleotides would not come together normally to make DNA or RNA but enzymes provide the proper environment and energy (by splitting the PPi) to make the reaction go. I understand why the poster above said no, and I partially agree.
     
  7. Mia305

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    I would say no on the enzymes... they speed up a reaction that would normally take place even if the enzyme was not present. It would just take place at a slower rate.
     
  8. laundry

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    um...as far as i know plants don't have centrosomes...their MTOCs don't have centrioles...at least angiosperms don't.
     

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