Dismiss Notice
SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

Brown vs. Mount Sinai

Discussion in 'Help Me Decide: School X vs Y' started by KidCuddly, Feb 17, 2017.

?

Brown vs. Sinai

  1. Brown

    19 vote(s)
    20.9%
  2. Sinai

    72 vote(s)
    79.1%
  1. KidCuddly

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hi everyone! I have been fortunate enough to garner acceptances to both Brown and Mt. Sinai, and now face the difficult task of deciding between the two. I was hoping that the SDN community might be able to help me distinguish between these programs, because right now the greatest deciding factor seems to be all about location (Providence vs. NYC). More than anything I want to attend a school with an emphasis on collaboration and student wellness, which both Sinai and Brown seem to have in spades. I think I could be very happy at both schools, which is why I'm having a hard time picking one (definitely a good problem to have).

    I guess my question is this: what besides location really distinguishes the culture and opportunities available at each school? What are the big differences in day-to-day life? And because I know location is actually a really big factor in this decision, what do people value about their own medical school locations? Clinical opportunities? Entertainment? Solitude? I guess I am trying to weigh the fear of being overwhelmed in NYC against the fear of being bored in Providence.

    Interests include urban/minority health disparities, EM, global health, and healthy food access issues.

    Any advice is appreciated!
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. applesaucey

    Joined:
    May 17, 2015
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    291
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    I can't say much about Brown but I interviwed and have been accepted at Sinai and I really loved it. If you can see yourself living in the city, then I don't think the location of Sinai can be beat with the $600/mo housing on Central park and the proximity to both some of the wealthiest and some of the poorest areas in the country. The diversity of the patient population wouldn't come close in Rhode Island. I think that'll be the biggest difference between the two, as they both seem very collaborative and laid back. Also consider the endless amount of things to do in NYC and if that appeals to you, because what you'll be doing in your free time is important too. Also a short train ride from the mountains and shore if that appeals to you. I would go for Sinai unless you know the city isn't for you.
     
    To be MD likes this.
  4. slippydubloons

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2016
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    323
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Interviewed @both, PM me and I can try to answer any specific questions you may have
     
  5. Willy38

    Willy38 you're killin' me smalls

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2013
    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    1,036
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Sinai by far.
     
  6. Hyelampa_2016

    Classifieds Approved

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2014
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    60
    Status:
    Medical Student, Post Doc, Medical Student (Accepted)
    Def cannot speak to Mt. Sinai but I interviewed at Brown and went there as well. I can say that providence has way more diversity than you would think. Cost of living cannot be beat compared to NYC. Their match list is also great! Very collaborative environment and nice new facilities. Also depends on what you want to go into in the future. Brown also seemed to have a lot of need-based aid if I am not mistaken.
     
  7. whataremychancetherapper

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2016
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    116
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I was an undergrad at Brown and have several friends who are med students at Alpert. While Alpert is a really great medical institution, the recurring theme from these med students really is that Providence doesn't offer much of an escape. This was also the general theme amongst undergrads. I do think that the needs of undergrads and med students are different, but in both cases, people generally traveled to Boston (or even up to New York) for more leisure time. Providence is pretty quiet (which some people do like, others don't) and its downtown area is very unremarkable. With that said, it has a nice restaurant scene (if you're into that). My friends who are med students have said that, when they do have free time, they sort of have to carve out experiences for themselves, as opposed to Providence offering an extravagant canvas for leisure. I think the importance of this certainly varies from person to person, but that's my (admittedly subjective) evaluation.
     
  8. DonFrancis95

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hey guys, I'm an aspiring matriculant to both Brown and Mt.sinai (as we all are- congratulations to those of you in this thread for being accepted!). I was wondering if you would be willing to share your stats, ec's, experiences, etc. and your general experience so far in applying to medical school. I am applying next cycle and am trying to gain as much insight and advice as possible (especially from those with the option of attending two out of three of my top choices!). Moreover, to those of you whom are enrolled can you discuss, beyond location and patient exposure (which was awesome to more about) how your medical education experience has been so far? I appreciate your time in advance, and again- congratulations!
     
    joe_1395 likes this.
  9. joe_1395

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    54
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I would like to know too!
     
  10. Ryuichi

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    32
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    should probably change your profile pic and user name so people cannot identify you no here. Just a heads up
     
  11. ubicaritas

    ubicaritas et amor

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    18
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Alpert med student (rising MS4) here--these are two great choices. Would be happy to talk to you in a PM about why I think Brown is the better choice!

    As a quick note, I do think it's interesting how focused many of these responses are on the setting of Providence. While I agree that it's not a crazy hopping city, it's a wonderful, great-lifestyle place to live with more than enough to keep you happy for four years--I've personally never felt the need to go to Boston 0r New York for leisure, though it's nice knowing that they are close by. Rhode Island has beautiful beaches, astonishing architecture, a vibrant culture, and plenty of things to do. My class has a hashtag-- #beachesmansionslemonade --that we use to show our love for RI.

    It's also a great place to practice medicine--we are literally the only medical school in the state, so you have unparalleled access to all of the many urban clinical sites, practice venues, and research faculty. We have a great reputation in the residency application season, and our matching stats reflect that. My understanding is that at NYC schools, though you have great learning opportunities, you have to play more of a competitive game with other schools/students to get access to certain sites and faculty.

    One thing that I think not too many people consider, but is still important: medical school is a busy, quite overwhelming experience for almost everyone, and I think there is great value to being in a setting that's easy to live in. In your third year of medical school, you are not going to have much time to travel, but you will need to move between clinical sites quickly and at odd hours. Providence is safe, friendly, uncomplicated, inexpensive, easy to move around, with great restaurants and hidden gems of hang-out spots. I was in Boston for undergrad and had the choice to stay there for med school; of the two cities, I think I would still choose Providence over it every time. You can really focus on what's important here. I really can't speak to living in NYC, because I've never considered it--much too crowded and hectic for me :) I will say that I know of several students here who chose Brown over various New York schools and have been very happy with their decision.

    All in all, this is just my two cents. I don't think you can go wrong with either choice! Happy choosing.
     
    deev04 likes this.
  12. deev04

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2017
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    247
    I've recently heard this from a few other med school friends at schools that are the only game in town/state. I don't think going to a school in a huge city saturated with med schools puts you at a disadvantage or limits you (after all bigger city=more people/more opportunities to divide up). However, I'm beginning to think that people underestimate the potential advantages of going to a school that's the only game in town or the state. Many of my friends have given very real examples of the enormity of the influence/presence of their medical school in their town/state and how this translates to some pretty cool opportunities for programs and research with the community. As one friend put it, being the only game around means everyone knows you and you have a monopoly of sorts on programs and research. This also means that if the research you are interested in or a program you have thought about is not already being done by you, it's not being done at all and there is an opportunity for you to create it.

    Sure, everybody knows Harvard, but if community members hear of a research project or clinic being started by the well-known and respected Med School that has been an established part of their community for years, you can bet they're going to think extremely highly of that. People take pride in their communities, and these Med Schools become a part of their community and that pride. This is probably especially true in Rhode Island, where Rhode Island loyalty runs extremely deep and Rhode Island pride is almost a defense mechanism (don't ask the Rhode Islander in Boston what the P on the their hat stands for- it's the Pawtucket Red Sox, Providence Bruins, etc).

    Providence hospitals also have a pretty large catchment area including many parts of Southeastern/Central/Western MA and Eastern CT, so the acuity and case diversity is top notch. Providence is also pretty diverse with a very large Latino community and a sizable refugee population.
     
    #12 deev04, Apr 11, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017

Share This Page