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osli

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Couldn't find anything on the LWW site. Seems Costanzo might have posted something on a VCU bulletin board about errata (http://www.curriculum.som.vcu.edu/c...formation&number=36&DaysPrune=1000&LastLogin=) but you need a login to see the thread. Google didn't turn up anything else that I noticed as being useful.

A search here turned up the question but no responses.

I'm about 9 pages into the 4th ed, and I have found what I think are perhaps a couple of errors (or maybe just poor wording), and a few more I had to go elsewhere to get clarification (definitely poor wording). I love the book, but was hoping that there was an errata list somewhere to save me the time of looking up everything that I have doubts about (most of the time I'm just plain wrong!).

Anyone know of a list?
 
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Here is what she posted:
Linda Costanzo said:
BRS Physiology, 4th edition, errata:

p. 111, Question 57. Change choice (C) from angiotensin II to angiotensinogen. Also adjust explanation.

p. 134, D, 1. Under "where" list, the last entry should be PaO2 (arterial PO2)

p. 139, Fig 4-12. V/Q for pulmonary embolus shoudl be infinity
 
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osli

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OK, since I was on the first 10 pages, and she didn't mention anything in the first 100... lol. :) BTW, thanks for posting what she had said there.

I'm nearing 100 pages in now and have found just a couple more perhaps. Typos I think, and maybe another few spots that could have used more explanation due to confusing wording.

I'm surprised there hasn't been a list here, since it is such a staple and often recommended book. Anyone out there have any corrections they have made and would like to share?
 

schistocyte

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BRS Physio 4th edition - Excellent book....haven't really thought to look for errors but I did come across what I think is one just now:

pg. 43 - under 3d (and also corresponding picture above). Cutting the geniculocalcarine tract causes homonymous hemianopia with macular sparing.

---> the macular sparing part conflicts with some other sources that I have seen. I thought that macular sparing only occurs when there's a lesion to the primary visual cortex (consisting of the cuneus and lingual gyrus), and this is made possible because the macular cortex of the primary visual cortex has a dual blood supply from both the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) and the Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA), whereas the other parts of the posterior cortex are supplied by only the PCA. A lesion to the geniculocalcarine tract (as mentioned in the excerpt above), however, would not result in macular sparing.
 

Knicks

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Are there anymore errors for the 3rd edition, other than the few that were posted in another thread relating to this?
 

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i believe i have found a mistake in the 4th edition. page 7:
3a.
under the second bullet

"the inactivation gate of the Na+ channel in nerve is closed by depolarization"
should be read:
"the inactivation gate of the Na+ channel in nerve is closed by repolarization"

No, actually you are wrong. the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. I know it sounds counterintuitive but it is true.

So if you were to increase the resting membrane potential (depol) of a nerve without reaching threshold (and before repolarizing it), you would find that a certain percentage of the Na channels would be inactivated because the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. The way that it works is that depol opens the normal gate and then a bit after this happens, the inactivation gate closes due to the depolarization. This allows the repolarizing K current to overtake the Na current.
 
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Instatewaiter

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BRS Physiology, Third Edition -- errata:
1. p. 16, C.1.b. An action potential in a presynatpci cell is INsufficient...

2. p. 37, B, first point. After Adrenergic Neurons, delete "whether in the sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system.

3. p. 222, 1. Under Mechanism of slow wave production. Delete "is the cyclic activation and deactivation of the cell membrane Na-K pump. Instead, it should read: "is the cyclic opening of Ca channels (depolarization), followed by opening of K channels (repolarization)."

4. P. 256, Figs 7-2 and 7-3. Should be GDP --> GTP

5. p. 276, e. (2), Should read increased mineralocorticoic levels (not aldosterone)
 

Instatewaiter

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BRS Physiology, 4th edition, errata:
p. 111, Question 57. Change choice (C) from angiotensin II to angiotensinogen. Also adjust explanation.

p. 134, D, 1. Under "where" list, the last entry should be PaO2 (arterial PO2)

p. 139, Fig 4-12. V/Q for pulmonary embolus shoudl be infinity
 

UditNarayan

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No, actually you are wrong. the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. I know it sounds counterintuitive but it is true.

So if you were to increase the resting membrane potential (depol) of a nerve without reaching threshold (and before repolarizing it), you would find that a certain percentage of the Na channels would be inactivated because the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. The way that it works is that depol opens the normal gate and then a bit after this happens, the inactivation gate closes due to the depolarization. This allows the repolarizing K current to overtake the Na current.

this is my understanding too (if i havnt forgotten all of this). this is why events that cause a slightly depolarized state will actually lead to more difficulty in firing action potentials (AP)...with the inactivation gates closed due to some depolarization, there are less gates available to fire the AP. does that make sense to you?
 

TRKATK

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this is my understanding too (if i havnt forgotten all of this). this is why events that cause a slightly depolarized state will actually lead to more difficulty in firing action potentials (AP)...with the inactivation gates closed due to some depolarization, there are less gates available to fire the AP. does that make sense to you?


Exactly. You can also relate this to hyperkalemia.
 

jandek

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No, actually you are wrong. the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. I know it sounds counterintuitive but it is true.

So if you were to increase the resting membrane potential (depol) of a nerve without reaching threshold (and before repolarizing it), you would find that a certain percentage of the Na channels would be inactivated because the inactivation gate is closed by depolarization. The way that it works is that depol opens the normal gate and then a bit after this happens, the inactivation gate closes due to the depolarization. This allows the repolarizing K current to overtake the Na current.

thanks! i came back to edit what i had written earlier after i read on in the chapter and realized my mistake. I appreciate the correction. This seem like an excelent board.
 

Instatewaiter

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thanks! i came back to edit what i had written earlier after i read on in the chapter and realized my mistake. I appreciate the correction. This seem like an excelent board.

No worries that is what the board is for.

And for those of you who are using the Costanzo book, all the errata I posted are directly from Dr Costanzo. She is on top of her stuff so even if it may seem wrong in the book, unless it is in the errata I would put my money on it being right in her book (unlike some other sources.. ahem FA).
 

virtu

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i think the arrow (direction of light) is pointing the wrong way for fig. 2-3 on page 42. does anyone know if it's right or wrong? can someone explain this if it's right?
 

rishi718

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is that still it for the fourth edidiotn brs physio

im loookin for errata online and ended up here

where instatewaiter posted 3 chagnes

is that it, and if not, can we please post them again, or the new ones. thanks
 

ej37

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Bump from the above post... I think I have found way more errors than just those few in the 4th edition. Any way to check to see if the list has updated? Thanks
 
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