Mistress S

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I may be interested in applying to Canadian schools, but I have a lot of questions about the process and how this would affect your education overall. If anyone knows the answers to any of these, I'd be grateful:

1.) Which Canadian schools accept American students, and how hard is it for an American to get into those schools?

2.) How does fin aid work for US students at Canadian schools? Are they expensive?

3.) If you decide to return to the US after school, how hard is it to get a US residency? Are you considered an FMG?

4.) Any other general info or advice from people with knowledge about this subject.

Thanks!
 

Mr. Rosewater

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1. Mcgill has 22 spots for international students. U of T and others may take a handful, but you'de have to research that yourself.

2. Mcgill is a member of AAMC, and is licensed by the LCME the same as all US schools, therefore you have the same access to US govt. money, and US residencies as US students.

3. Mcgill has a really good match list and no, you're not an FMG.

4. Just realize that it's very competitive to go to canadian ms's. anyone who gets into a school like mcgill or U of T will surely make it into US med schools as well (meaning if you can't get in here, don't bother with there). as you can see, i really only know about mcgill, i can't speak for the rest.

tuition for americans at mcgill is approx. 17K.
 

MichiMO

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I did a lot of research on this because I went to undergrad in Canada and wanted to stay. Turns out there is only one school that really looks at American applicants. (some others claim they do but if you look at how many applicants they actually accept...your chances are about as good as getting into Harvard...actually your chances are probably better at Harvard).
McGill University in Montreal, Quebec acceptes 40 international applicants. I am not sure how many international students apply so I can't tell you how competitive it is. However, McGill is one of the best medical schools in North America (check out there match list), so I would imagine it is pretty tough...plus the fact that it is the only school that really looks at international applicants.
As for coming back to the states, as long as you do well on your USMLE's, a degree from McGill is very highly regarded...you would have just as good of a shot at competitive residencies as if you had gone to any top 20 school in the states (I am not positive about this but the last time I looked at McGill's match list, tons of the applicants did residencies at Harvard affiliated hospitals).
However, you would have to check out whether or not you needed French for McGill....I know you need it for the law school, not sure about the med. school but it would seem likely because you rotate through hospitals with french speaking patients.

But also, keep in mind the weather! I did my undergrad. at McGill and I couldn't stand the thought of four more years in the frigid cold!
 
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MichiMO

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Its 22 now? When I was applying it was 40. Just goes to show how competitive it is.
 

MeowMix

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It is very very difficult to get into most Canadian med schools. Many have high GPA and MCAT cutoffs (they will not even consider your app if you do not meet these). For example, an out of province applicant at the U of Ottawa needs a 3.83 GPA.

Also, the Canadian med schools are on a different time line than US; the Ontario med schools interview in March/April and will all give out acceptances on May 15, for example.
 

VCMM414

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Originally posted by Mr. Rosewater
yup, it's 22, and everything's taught in english.

yes but do you rotate exclusively in english-speaking hospitals?
 

Mistress S

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Thanks for the replies so far...I wasn't looking at Canadian med schools as an easier option than US schools, rather I prefer the Canadian medical system to our own in many ways and would be more interested in learning and possibly practicing medicine in such a system. My current GPA is 3.7, MCAT 29 (10 BS, 12 VR, 7 PS) although I am retaking it in April in the hopes of raising my PS score a couple of points. I have become disenchanted (to say the least) with the political establishment and the healthcare system in the US in recent years, and icnreasingly find myself drawn to the idea of living in a more progressive democracy where gay marriage is legal, the government doesn't waste billions of taxpayer dollars imprisoning people for smoking pot, and most important for a future physician, all people are entitled to healthcare. I work at a "free" reproductive health clinic now, and every day feel depressed & disgusted when I must turn people away because they can't pay anything and either don't qualify for funding or their services aren't covered under our paltry funding program. The idea of working in a medical system where at least basic preventative care is covered for everyone seems infinitely more humane and logical to me.

However, it sounds very competitive so I don't know if I would have much of a shot, and I'm also not sure I would want to live in Quebec. There are also a number of practical issues, beginning with the fact that I have lived with my partner for going on 2 years now and we plan to continue living together while I am in med school, although we have no immediate plans to marry. It could be complicated for him to get the necessary work/educational visas he would need, and I'm not sure what the cost and fin aid would be like for him to pursue his education in Canada. His dad was born in England though and has dual citizenship, so he might too; not sure how that works or if it matters for Canada anyway. Guess I should look into that!
 

Treg

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Hi there MistressS,

I am currently going through the application cycle in Alberta. Here you have to have permanent resident status just to apply (I am married to a Canadian and have lived here for 4 years). I think that the process is really frustrating here for several reasons:

1. There are some crazy GPA requirements, like the averages here for matriculants are 3.7, which is higher than most US schools. I am not sure if this is due to grade inflation or what...

2. The process is soooo much slower than in the US. The interview cycle is just starting right now, and people don' t know until May-July.

The benefits:

1. Much cheaper.

2. Two schools with 3 year programs (no breaks though!).

I have experienced both health systems, and although I strongly prefer canada's, I can see the pitfalls to both.

If I were you, and you are serious about coming to Canada, do it at the residency level. Still this is not guarranteed. Also, in terms of immigrating here, it is a painful, expensive process (and I was married to a Canadian!).

Good luck!

Treg
 

winstonm

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As everyone else said McGill and Toronto are the first that come to mind although McMaster technically considers international applicants and possibly Calgary (the last two are 3-yr programs).

If you put any faith in the Gourman rankings, McGill was top 5 in the world and Toronto top 10, and you would have outstanding clinical opportunities at both schools. Toronto has one of the largest medical institutions in the continent and one of the premiere pediatric hospitals in the world, and the last time I checked McGill was building a massive new facility to replace the existing hospitals.

One thing you should check is the state of Quebec's health system and also the strange regulations they have for people who want to remain in the province when they have finished their schooling. I believe you have to know French to do so but I'm not sure.

You'd have a better chance at McGill (22 Americans accepted vs about 5 out of province Canadians! I guess they like US money cuz Cdn. tuition is cheap and it helps maintain the school's rep in the States).

Good luck.:thumbup:
 
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