Thefutureofcardio

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Aug 17, 2016
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I'm not the best math student, like an 80 or so if I try really hard to pass, (I'm still in High School). My biology and chemistry grades are stellar, 95 or so for Bio and a 104 at one time for chemistry. I will be taking a state level course in chemistry when school starts back up. Anyway, I've had a few family members die from cardiac illnesses and I've always known that I wanted to become a Cardiothoracic surgeon.

My fear has always been my mediocre math skills. I'm really not that good and I recongize that, I'm always willing to work on it though, my question is do Cardiothoracic surgeons use complex math everyday or is it once in a while? Is there no math involved at all? It's all very new to me and I can try and find answers elsewhere but I can never get an exact answer.

I've heard surgery is mostly based in memory, surgeons perform the same task over and over and eventually it becomes second nature to them. Is this how it actually is? Like would a general practictioner use more math than a Cardiothoracic surgeon?

This is a bit jumbled, so I'm going to make it easier. How much math do Cardiothoracic surgeons use on a daily basis 0r is there none at all? If so, how do they use it? Can a Cardiothoracic surgeon not be that good at math?

Thanks for answering, but this has been bugging me for years now.
 

tf21594

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What year are you in high school? I got C's through my first 3 semesters of high school because I was awful at math. Turned that around, got a 5 on the BC calc test and an A in Calc III in college. If I was in your shoes, I wouldn't be worried about math down the road in my career. Focus on learning the stuff and understanding the thought processes- that's why math is important. It's logical but it takes a ton of practice. Do some additional problems on top of your assigned homework. Don't quit. It'll all click one day, I promise.
 

[POLAR] FlipSide

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I always wanted to be somebody in highschool, but now I realize I should have been more specific.
 
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Thefutureofcardio

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Aug 17, 2016
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What year are you in high school? I got C's through my first 3 semesters of high school because I was awful at math. Turned that around, got a 5 on the BC calc test and an A in Calc III in college. If I was in your shoes, I wouldn't be worried about math down the road in my career. Focus on learning the stuff and understanding the thought processes- that's why math is important. It's logical but it takes a ton of practice. Do some additional problems on top of your assigned homework. Don't quit. It'll all click one day, I promise.
I am currently in my 11th grade year. Taking AP History, AP English, and Honors Chemistry. Aiming to take AP Biology my senior year just for my own satisfaction. But anyway, I've heard since Biology is the science that has near to no math in it, it's logical to assume doctors either don't like math or just simply aren't good at it.
 

Kurk

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I am currently in my 11th grade year. Taking AP History, AP English, and Honors Chemistry. Aiming to take AP Biology my senior year just for my own satisfaction. But anyway, I've heard since Biology is the science that has near to no math in it, it's logical to assume doctors either don't like math or just simply aren't good at it.
No you need at the very least upper-level algebra for upper-level biology courses in college (especially if you major in cellular biology). Surgeons also need to have the capability to think and problem solve because while a lot of is repetition, there is always the chance you might get an anomaly and have to problem solve (I learned this from high-school anatomy dissecting cats!). You know what teaches you to problem-solve and think? Math! I'm not amazing with math myself naturally, but by studying on my own with resources outside of school I manage to pull my weight and more.
 
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TheBiologist

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doctors and surgeons do not use much math; good doctors/surgeons though, in my (perhaps arrogant) opinion, are good at math. most med schools will also like to see a semester of college calculus and a semester of college statistics.

surgery is no joke career path; the problem solving skills that math makes your brain use will be used heavily in the education and on the job. no, you won't be taking derivatives or graphing parabolas, but you will be using the "same brain cells," if you will
 

Smurfette

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No, most doctors do not use complex math in their daily work. However, the ability to apply concepts and problem-solve is important in day-to-day work. Logic is also important. For a surgeon who may have to find another way to complete a task, the ability to find a work-around to a problem is crucial to a successful operation. A working knowledge of statistics is helpful for interpreting studies; many students/doctors essentially get a crash course in statistics when working on a publication for the first time, but it's not part of direct patient care.

I personally am good at math, but the rare traditional "math" needed in a clinical setting generally is something you can use a calculator for, like calculating a dose based on patient weight.
 
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Winged Scapula

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No, most doctors do not use complex math in their daily work. However, the ability to apply concepts and problem-solve is important in day-to-day work. Logic is also important. For a surgeon who may have to find another way to complete a task, the ability to find a work-around to a problem is crucial to a successful operation. A working knowledge of statistics is helpful for interpreting studies; many students/doctors essentially get a crash course in statistics when working on a publication for the first time, but it's not part of direct patient care.
Exactly.

I personally am good at math, but the rare traditional "math" needed in a clinical setting generally is something you can use a calculator for, like calculating a dose based on patient weight.
Or adding up our doubloons.
 
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Thefutureofcardio

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Wow! You guys have actually given me the answers I've been looking for. I usually just can't find them or people just give stupid responses but these were genuine.
 
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