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MyDad'sBonJovi

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Hey all, MS2 here.

I know that all sorts of medical specialties can be made to fit the doctor, but regardless of that various fields are known for certain types of lifestyles.
I was curious if anyone had any suggestions on types of specialties (including fellowships!) to look into for someone looking for a career that has:

- no/low call (don't mind long work days, but regularity is a must)

- rigid hours/set schedule well in advance

- allows you to work in a team setting (and not necessarily have to be the team lead)

- high level of patient contact/relationship building/patient education

- mostly procedural in work (more high tech/screens/tools than meds)

- can be flexible (whether its allowing for vacation time > 2 weeks, or accommodating for military reserves).



Any and all suggestions are welcome! If there are very obvious answers, I apologize in advance for not thinking of them. Thanks :)
 

Mass Effect

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You're describing psychiatry to a T. For procedures -- ECT and TMS, but none of the procedures you'd see in other fields. Everything else though is psych.
 
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spartan25

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Ophthalmology
 
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libertyyne

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Family practice
Derm
Ophto

less so
Uro
ENT

Besides that you cant have procedural heavy and not have call without some serious paycut or negotiations. On the same hand you cant have extensive patient contact and extensive procedures.

Some more considerations

Psych
Radiology MSK/Breast might be another avenue.
GI
 
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kb1900

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Will just throw pain/regional in there as wel
 
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karayaa

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A couple that no one has mentioned yet
-PMR - find a job without call, and you'll be in a team atmosphere with a high degree of patient contact, and lots of procedures
-ObGyn - get a job in a health system where you focus on office gyn and smaller gyn surgeries, where you don't need to take call
-Rad onc - job market sounds horrible but otherwise it has it all - no call, deep relationships with patients, the most tech-heavy field in medicine
 

Aleaz

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OK, I have to laugh here because as an MS2 you have no true experience in what may interest you. I would guesstimate that in my class of 150 where most thought they knew what they wanted--nearly ALL changed once they got into actual rotational hospital work/call/scut/experience as MS3/4. From the many threads here, I think you guys worry WAY too much. Getting thru medical school in a balanced way, staying fit and healthy both in body and mind and doing well as an MS3/4--that's your #1 priority. THEN, as you mature in your work, choosing a specialty will come naturally. Trying to gauge what you want by so many specs will have you choosing a career for your LIFE-like a car. no you want to make the heart sing--as one old attending put it. If you love what you do--then the training becomes a lot easier--and your LIFE will be doing what you love. Choosing a specialty due to scheduling etc can make you miserable in your job...like so many other non medical careers. My advice would be to stay focused on the present--do the best you can, stay balanced, and choose the path you enjoy the most down-the-line. NOT now;)
 

cj_cregg

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Family practice would be a great fit for most of those. The balance might be a bit less procedures than you like but you can definitely do plenty if you make an effort. A sports med fellowship would open a lot of doors for additional procedures, point of care ultrasound, etc.
 
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