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Caribbean Medical School Approval and Accreditation

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medyexpress

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So this question is about Caribbean medical school accreditation. I'm aware of how the accreditation is ranked thanks to this site. http://www.caribbeanmedstudent.com/caribbean-medical-school-rankings/
But I'm not sure how one would obtain a license to practice in any state if the school is accredited and not approved. For instance Trinity School of medicine is accredited but not approved in all 50 states. If I obtained my medical degree from this school how would I obtain my licenses in the states that I would like to practice in, for instance New York, Florida or California?

I do understand that if a school is on the dissaproved list then you will not be able to practice there but what if it's not on that list?
Also if a school gets approved in a state after you graduate will you automatically be able to practice in that state?

If this question was already discussed in detail, I apologize for the redundancy and please feel free to direct me to the appropriate post. But I've searched for the answer to this question and I haven't found a direct answer.

If anyone has this information please feel free to share.
 
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ThoracicGuy

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So this question is about Caribbean medical school accreditation. I'm aware of how the accreditation is ranked thanks to this site. http://www.caribbeanmedstudent.com/caribbean-medical-school-rankings/
But I'm not sure how one would obtain a license to practice in any state if the school is accredited and not approved. For instance Trinity School of medicine is accredited but not approved in all 50 states. If I obtained my medical degree from this school how would I obtain my licenses in the states that I would like to practice in, for instance New York, Florida or California?

I do understand that if a school is on the dissaproved list then you will not be able to practice there but what if it's not on that list?
Also if a school gets approved in a state after you graduate will you automatically be able to practice in that state?

If this question was already discussed in detail, I apologize for the redundancy and please feel free to direct me to the appropriate post. But I've searched for the answer to this question and I haven't found a direct answer.

I hope Skip chimes in because I know he knows a lot about this but if anyone else has this information please feel free to share.

Don't look at any school there unless you are approved to be eligible for a license in all fifty States. Doing otherwise is basically throwing your money away.
 
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NotAProgDirector

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"accredited" really means nothing outside of the US/Canada. All schools are accredited by their home countries. The statement on the weblink you posted that some outside accreditation is "comparable" to LCME is hogwash. So really, it's all about approval. Schools can be approved, disapproved, or nothing (meaning that the school hasn't tried to get approved). Only CA and NY actually approve schools, that I know of.

If your school does not qualify for licensure in a state on the day you graduate from it, you can NEVER get a license in that state. To be fair, that's not completely true -- a medical board can always make an exception if they want. But you should assume that they will not make an exception for you. If the school gets approval after you've graduated, that's not going to help you at all. If your school is approved when you start and gets disapproved while you're there, you're equally screwed.

If a school is on neither list, then you won't get a license in CA or NY. Other states may allow you a license as long as the school isn't disapproved. If you want to work in NY or CA, go to a school that's approved there. Don't forget that this includes all residency programs in those states also.
 
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medyexpress

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"accredited". ....,,.....

For that response. I'm just confused. How is it that these schools allow students to get residencies in NYC and some even practice there and in other states. That must mean that they make a lot of exceptions. What different Steps do you need to take to get a license from these accredited schools than the approved schools? Why would so many people go to the accredited schools if they knew they were not going to be able to practice almost anywhere?
 

medyexpress

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Don't.......

Thank you for your response also. I'm just trying to figure out the process because there are some students from these schools that end up practicing medicine. I'm just trying to figure out how and where.
 

ThoracicGuy

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Thank you for your response also. I'm just trying to figure out the process because there are some students from these schools that end up practicing medicine. I'm just trying to figure out how and where.

These schools aren't even worthy of consideration. Just because there is a handful of graduates that succeed, it's not a good bet.
 
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medyexpress

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I understand what you are trying to say, it's just an uphill battle.
I took a look at a couple of states and some of them actually have a section on the medical license form for unapproved schools. I guess the whole system just baffles me.
 

ThoracicGuy

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I understand what you are trying to say, it's just an uphill battle.
I took a look at a couple of states and some of them actually have a section on the medical license form for unapproved schools. I guess the whole system just baffles me.

If you must go to the Caribbean, go to one of the "Big 4". The others just aren't worth it. Even if there are some that have success, it's too much of a gamble to be worth taking.
 
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the argus

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What about AUA?
Forget about the lesser known Caribbean schools. There is no reason to ever consider them. The admission standards are so lax at the big 4 Caribbean schools that if you can't get into one of them, the chances of you successfully completing med school and passing the USMLEs is very low.

Why are you asking all these questions about the smaller Caribbean schools?
 
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medyexpress

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You really want to be an Uber driver or a lab tech? Because that will be your most likely fate.


There are some successful students from AUA. They are also approved in all 50 states now.
 

the argus

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There are some successful students from AUA. They are also approved in all 50 states now.
Since you seem to be new to this website, I'll give you my advice. Don't pay attention to a single thing Goro says. He is a non-physician PhD who teaches basic science at an osteopathic medical school. He is incredibly biased and unknowledgeable. He doesn't have the experience or expertise to make any meaningful contributions on this topic. His only experience is from what he reads on SDN.

Now back to your questions. Again, there is basically no reason to ever go to a Caribbean school outside of the big 4. The admissions standards are very lax at those 4 schools, and really anyone with any chance of successfully completing med school/boards should be able to get in. Schools like AUA won't really save you any money (AUA's tuition is ~$190,000 before things like rent, travel, etc), they don't have the name recognition, and don't have a proven track record of placing grads into residency.

If you're at the point of considering Caribbean medical schools, limit your choices to Ross, SGU, AUC or Saba.
 
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Skip Intro

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For instance Trinity School of medicine is accredited but not approved in all 50 states.

The only agencies that "accredit" medical schools in the United States are the LCME and the COCA.

-Skip
 

Skip Intro

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@Skip Intro thank you for your reply. So basically the other medical schools accreditation means nothing.

No, accreditation means something. The schools are "accredited" by agencies in the country they are in. Accreditation is a term of art. It simply means that the meet the educational standards for what that country perceives to be an adequate educational experience in whatever field of academics that is in question.

What you need to know is if the state medical licensing boards accept those standards for medical education for a particular school. The first step, after you graduate, is getting ECFMG certification, which is a federal level attestation that you have demonstrated the minimal requirements that qualifies whatever degree you present for that certification. Even with that, many state licensing boards still may not accept that degree for further licensing. Interestingly, some may even issue a training license but will not subsequently issue a permanent unrestricted license.

A lot of people get hung up on and/or confuse this concept of accreditation. So, yes, while it means "something" it is not the most important thing. ECFMG certification and recognition by whatever state medical board where you want to obtain a permanent and unrestricted license to practice does. Being accredited is certainly nothing to brag about, in other words.

-Skip
 

Dr. Booty

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Caam-hp is the accrediting body for Carib schools. Do not even consider a school unless it has this.

You also want to see if the country is ncfmea approved (eligible for title 4). There are only 5 or 6 Carib countries I think.

You should also seriously consider the fact that Ross and AUC are owned by devry and have a 60-80% attrition rate. Saba isn't as bad but it's still like 40%.

Cali and NY approval are only possible after ncfmea approval/caam-hp accredidation. If the schools gets approval before you graduate then you will be eligible for residency/licensing.
 

the argus

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You should also seriously consider the fact that Ross and AUC are owned by devry and have a 60-80% attrition rate. Saba isn't as bad but it's still like 40%.
This is pure nonsense. I'm sure this poster has special access to the books of all 3 of these schools to be able to make this claim. I was at Ross from 2011-2014, and attrition for my year was ~25%.

Ross places ~800 people into residency every year. Going by these ridiculous numbers, Ross would have to start 2,000 (60% attrition) to 4,000 (80% attrition) people per year. That's ~650-1350 per semester. It was ~400 per semester when I was there.
 
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Since you seem to be new to this website, I'll give you my advice. Don't pay attention to a single thing Goro says. He is a non-physician PhD who teaches basic science at an osteopathic medical school. He is incredibly biased and unknowledgeable. He doesn't have the experience or expertise to make any meaningful contributions on this topic. His only experience is from what he reads on SDN.

Even if you don't like his tone, what Goro says is echoed by actual PD's on SDN. Accurate or not, to attack his/her academic credentials is a bit of an ad hominem. If he/she was saying something that was truly at odds with what they actually said, you might have a point.

But, assuming you don't want to trust what Goro says, you're in no better position to criticize it. You're not in academic medicine or in administrative leadership of a residency program. From what I gather from your previous posts, you're a Caribbean grad with a huge chip on your shoulder because you couldn't get a better residency despite your USMLE scores. You don't want to admit that the true art of medicine isn't learned in med school (I'm learning more in residency than I did my entire third year) and that you were, by definition, an inferior candidate because of where you went to medical school (The leveling of the playing field doesn't come until residency).

I get it; Goro's tone is harsh and he/she works for a DO school so one could see a possible bias. But you're doing everyone here a disservice by trying to insinuate that you do not have one. You very much do. Stop attacking Goro and his/her employment status and dispute what he says about how PD's view USIMGs, if that's your major disagreement with him/her.
 
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the argus

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Even if you don't like his tone, what Goro says is echoed by actual PD's on SDN. Accurate or not, to attack his/her academic credentials is a bit of an ad hominem. If he/she was saying something that was truly at odds with what they actually said, you might have a point.

But, assuming you don't want to trust what Goro says, you're in no better position to criticize it. You're not in academic medicine or in administrative leadership of a residency program. From what I gather from your previous posts, you're a Caribbean grad with a huge chip on your shoulder because you couldn't get a better residency despite your USMLE scores. You don't want to admit that the true art of medicine isn't learned in med school (I'm learning more in residency than I did my entire third year) and that you were, by definition, an inferior candidate because of where you went to medical school (The leveling of the playing field doesn't come until residency).

I get it; Goro's tone is harsh and he/she works for a DO school so one could see a possible bias. But you're doing everyone here a disservice by trying to insinuate that you do not have one. You very much do. Stop attacking Goro and his/her employment status and dispute what he says about how PD's view USIMGs, if that's your major disagreement with him/her.
Since you looked at my posting history, please show posts where I have a huge chip on my shoulder. Show an example where I've said something untrue due to my bias as a Caribbean grad. I also love my residency program, and have every option open to me that I would ever want for my career.

And what the hell are you talking about with, "don't want to admit that the true art of medicine isn't learned in med school ... and that you were, by definition, an inferior candidate because of where you went to medical school." I honestly have no idea what you're getting at with the first part, and I repeatedly say and acknowledge that Caribbean grads are second class applicants with limited residency options.

So since you're making all these accusations about me, go ahead and back them up. Please find some quotes that exemplify my incredible bias.

EDIT: Looking at your posting history makes your defense of Goro and his nonsense even more ridiculous. You summed up my complaints pretty well actually,
My experiences will always trump what you can "quote" someone else saying. Until you have experienced it for yourself, your argument is meaningless.
 
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Shinken

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I'm involved with GME/academic medicine and reviewing resident applications to our training program, and although I agree that Goro's delivery is not always the most diplomatic, what he says is true.

I understand the concept of a second chance, working hard, etc. but the reality is that going to the Caribbean is extremely risky unless your academic record at graduation is spotless.
 

the argus

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I'm involved with GME/academic medicine and reviewing resident applications to our training program, and although I agree that Goro's delivery is not always the most diplomatic, what he says is true.

I understand the concept of a second chance, working hard, etc. but the reality is that going to the Caribbean is extremely risky unless your academic record at graduation is spotless.
No one denies Caribbean grads are second tier residency applicants, and the room for error is minimal. I'm curious if you actually agree with this stuff,
The pool of US applicants from the Caribbean is viewed differently by Program Directors. The DDx for a Caribbean grad is pretty off-putting: bad judgment, bad advice, egotism, gullibility, overbearing parents, inability to delay gratification, IA's, legal problems, weak research skills, high risk behavior ... Just about everyone from a Caribbean school has one or more of these problems and PDs know it.
Do you agree that 10s of thousands of your colleagues, a great many of which are also family docs, can be defined as above. Do you make assumptions about people like that?

Or how about this,
Bad grades and scores are the least of the deficits from a PD's standpoint. A strong academic showing in a Caribbean medical school does not erase this stigma. It fact it increases the perception that the reason for the choice was on the above-mentioned list!
Do you also agree that doing well in the Caribbean is a bad thing? When you see a Caribbean grad with good step scores does that make you more skeptical of that person?

There's countless other ridiculous comments I could point to, I'll just stick to that ridiculous diatribe that he re-posts everywhere.



Goro is ridiculous for 2 major reasons.

1. He has zero experience or expertise that would qualify him to make these assertions. Never went to medical school, never did residency, never has treated a single patient, and has never been involved in anything related to a medical residency. Yet he still feels qualified to say the things he does.
2. The apparent disdain he has for the Caribbean students themselves. Lots of people, me included, have legitimate gripes with the way Caribbean schools do business. What is bizarre is his apparent need to diss the actual students.

This is a middle-aged man who spends his time on an anonymous website, for a profession he's not even a part of, trashing thousands of people half his age that he's never met that are attempting to do something that he was never brave enough to do himself. Dude is a weasel, and should be treated as such.
 
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Shinken

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As I understand, Goro is involved in GME, so he does have experience/expertise in the field. Nothing he's said has been off base in my opinion.

Doing well in the Caribbean is not a bad thing at all, but it does make you wonder why the student went there in the first place. You have to admit that a stellar applicant from the Caribbean begs the question "why did he end up there?". Kind of like when my teachers asked me why I wanted to become a family physician - "Why family medicine, you're so smart!" (Groan).
 

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As I understand, Goro is involved in GME, so he does have experience/expertise in the field. Nothing he's said has been off base in my opinion.

Doing well in the Caribbean is not a bad thing at all, but it does make you wonder why the student went there in the first place. You have to admit that a stellar applicant from the Caribbean begs the question "why did he end up there?". Kind of like when my teachers asked me why I wanted to become a family physician - "Why family medicine, you're so smart!" (Groan).
Sometimes good students simply don't get into US schools. The notion that having excellent grades and decent MCAT scores will get you in is simply just not true. Every US med school class has that group of bozos which leave you begging the question "Out of all the decent applicants, there wasn't a SINGLE one better than them?".
 

the argus

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As I understand, Goro is involved in GME, so he does have experience/expertise in the field. Nothing he's said has been off base in my opinion.

Doing well in the Caribbean is not a bad thing at all, but it does make you wonder why the student went there in the first place. You have to admit that a stellar applicant from the Caribbean begs the question "why did he end up there?". Kind of like when my teachers asked me why I wanted to become a family physician - "Why family medicine, you're so smart!" (Groan).
Goro is a non-physician PhD who teaches basic science at an osteopathic medical school. Not involved in GME. You say nothing is off base, then immediately in the next sentence contradict one of his talking points.

Look, if you agree with his opinions that's your prerogative. I'm sure there are PDs and other residency program leadership that also do. But to present this as some universal truth is laughable. There are hundreds of Caribbean grads that are chosen over some USMDs, and lots of DOs, every year.

If not, then why would 87 US-IMGs match into EM last year when DOs only had a 77% match rate (204/264). Why would 82 US-IMGs match into general surgery last year when DOs only had a 49% match rate (49/100). Why would you see 727 US-IMGs match into FM when there were 40 unmatched DOs. Why would you see >1,000 US-IMGs match into IM when there were 55 unmatched DOs. Why would you ever see a US-IMG match into ortho or ophtho (admittedly few, but it happens)?

Why? Because the nonsense Goro peddles, and that you apparently agree with, is just that, nonsense. Are USMDs preferred over US-IMGs? Absolutely. Are DOs preferred over US-IMGs? Depends on the program, but often yes. But all the other stuff, just pure hogwash.

For him to present his opinions as absolute truths, especially as they are backed up with zero credentials that would qualify him to make such assertions, is very silly to me.

http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Main-Match-Results-and-Data-2016.pdf
http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Charting-Outcomes-US-Osteopathic-2016.pdf
 
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W19

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These Caribbean vs US MD/DO pissing contest will never end.... The truth is that the match is getting extremely competitive by the year, even for US grad...

If you gonna go to a Carib school, you should definitely try to get into one of the schools that has good track record, and these schools are: SGU, AUC, ROSS, SABA >>> MUA or AUA.
 

the argus

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These Caribbean vs US MD/DO pissing contest will never end.... The truth is that the match is getting extremely competitive by the year, even for US grad...

If you gonna go to a Carib school, you should definitely try to get into one of the schools that has good track record, and these schools are: SGU, AUC, ROSS, SABA >>> MUA or AUA.
This is not a Caribbean vs USMD/DO pissing contest. You have a serious reading comprehension problem, not to mention a repeatedly exemplified extremely poor grasp of match statistics. The nonsense you spew is almost as bad as Goro, except I think yours comes from a place of fear and lack of common sense as opposed to just general dickishness.

And the truth is not that the match is getting extremely competitive by the year. It continues to be about as competitive as it has been.
 

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I'm sorry I got into this, I'm not interested in engaging in a pointless SDN discussion on DO vs US MD vs Carib.

I do agree with Goro, and nothing he has said is off base. I don't even see how I contradicted one of his talking points. Fact is, going to the Caribbean for medical school is very risky. Period. End of story. Nobody cares that someone last year matched into ophthalmology, or a handful of Carib grads matched into orthopedics or derm. You only look at the rare successful cases, not the thousands of shattered dreams. Spewing all those statistics is meaningless. Nobody that knows what's going on in GME is going to agree that going Carib is a good idea.

Look at the whole picture, not the individual statistics that can be taken out of context. To imply that a US IMG has an easier time matching than a US DO is absolutely ludicrous.

I admire your passion for this topic, but I feel you take things too personally.
 

the argus

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I'm sorry I got into this, I'm not interested in engaging in a pointless SDN discussion on DO vs US MD vs Carib.

I do agree with Goro, and nothing he has said is off base. I don't even see how I contradicted one of his talking points. Fact is, going to the Caribbean for medical school is very risky. Period. End of story. Nobody cares that someone last year matched into ophthalmology, or a handful of Carib grads matched into orthopedics or derm. You only look at the rare successful cases, not the thousands of shattered dreams. Spewing all those statistics is meaningless. Nobody that knows what's going on in GME is going to agree that going Carib is a good idea.

Look at the whole picture, not the individual statistics that can be taken out of context. To imply that a US IMG has an easier time matching than a US DO is absolutely ludicrous.

I admire your passion for this topic, but I feel you take things too personally.
You missed the entire point. I'm in no way saying US-IMGs have an easier time matching than a DOs. And I'm also in no way trying to start a USMD vs DO vs US-IMG contest.

I'm merely pointing out that if all the things Goro says about how Caribbean grads are judged were actually true, you would never see US-IMGs match in those numbers with that many DOs going unmatched. You would also never see a Caribbean grad in the most competitive specialties.

I don't take anything said on an anonymous forum personally. Just trying to inject some reality.
 

bedevilled ben

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I do agree with Goro, and nothing he has said is off base. .

Plenty of things he says are off base. He frequently trots out the same copy-paste arguments that have been debunked dozens of times by dozens of veteran posters on this forum. There are plenty of good reasons to avoid Caribbean medical schools. His arguments aren't among them, regardless of his credentials.
 
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"accredited" really means nothing outside of the US/Canada. All schools are accredited by their home countries. The statement on the weblink you posted that some outside accreditation is "comparable" to LCME is hogwash. So really, it's all about approval. Schools can be approved, disapproved, or nothing (meaning that the school hasn't tried to get approved). Only CA and NY actually approve schools, that I know of.

If your school does not qualify for licensure in a state on the day you graduate from it, you can NEVER get a license in that state. To be fair, that's not completely true -- a medical board can always make an exception if they want. But you should assume that they will not make an exception for you. If the school gets approval after you've graduated, that's not going to help you at all. If your school is approved when you start and gets disapproved while you're there, you're equally screwed.

If a school is on neither list, then you won't get a license in CA or NY. Other states may allow you a license as long as the school isn't disapproved. If you want to work in NY or CA, go to a school that's approved there. Don't forget that this includes all residency programs in those states also.

Welp! I guess that's the end of my lurking.

Hi folks. A lot to cover, here.

First, before I dive in, I want to make one thing clear: If your benchmark, whether personal or as a consensus of SDN, is that an international school needs to have approved status for all fifty states to be considered viable, then, obviously, that’s fine and I have no argument there.

However, there are a few things I want to clear up as far as justification for that benchmark.

"'accredited' really means nothing outside of the US/Canada. All schools are accredited by their home countries. The statement on the weblink you posted that some outside accreditation is 'comparable' to LCME is hogwash.”

The nature of there being international license portability at all means that home nation accreditation and comparability regulation is extant and valid, some more so than others, though. In the particular case of Trinity, we have CAAM-HP accreditation. CAAM-HP accreditation, while an international aegis across the Caribbean, it is specifically put into practice by each nation that formally adopts it, superseding its own national accreditation body.

While Trinity has had national accreditation from St. Vincent since 2008, its CAAM-HP accreditation came through last year. St. Vincent has also formally adopted CAAM-HP as its official accreditation body and standard. The standards and practices of CAAM-HP as they are applied in St. Vincent and the Grenadines has been formally evaluated by the US Department of Education’s National Committee on Foreign Medical Education Accreditation and declared to be comparable to US accreditation.

NCFMEA, in their own words: “The countries listed below have been reviewed by the NCFMEA and found to use standards to accredit their medical schools that are comparable to the standards used to accredit medical schools in the United States.”

To clarify, this does not mean any school from a nation on the NCFMEA’s list is comparable, it means any school from that nation that has the named accreditation.

We are a relatively new school, having been founded in 2008. And we recognize that we have an uphill battle as both a new school and one in the Caribbean.


"So really, it's all about approval. Schools can be approved, disapproved, or nothing (meaning that the school hasn't tried to get approved). Only CA and NY actually approve schools, that I know of."


While there are compacts and reciprocity across the US that take their lead from California and NY, many other states approve and disapprove schools in the way you’re referring to them. Texas and Florida do their own approvals, for example. We aren’t disapproved anywhere and we are accumulating our approvals as we go. With our CAAM-HP accreditation, and the subsequent NCFMEA approval, we are now working through our Title IV levels (there are many levels, it’s not a binary state by any stretch. For any gamers reading this, it’s very similar to leveling up in an RPG as new benefits are opened up along with greater recognition, challenges, and responsibilities).

"If your school does not qualify for licensure in a state on the day you graduate from it, you can NEVER get a license in that state. To be fair, that's not completely true -- a medical board can always make an exception if they want. But you should assume that they will not make an exception for you. If the school gets approval after you've graduated, that's not going to help you at all. If your school is approved when you start and gets disapproved while you're there, you're equally screwed."

Respectfully, that is not accurate, it may have been at one point, but it isn’t anymore. License portability (internally, within the US and Canada) is complicated. At current, if you have a medical degree from a school that is not approved by California or New York, but not disapproved, you can graduate, do your residency elsewhere, and after a certain number of years, move to California. There is a threshold where real world medical practice overrides any medical school level complexities to licensure.

1. Four years of practice prior to applying in California.
2. Certification by a specialty board approved by the American Board of Medical Specialties
3. No disciplinary action taken against the applicant by any medical licensing authority, the applicant has not been the subject of adverse judgments or settlements resulting from the practice of medicine that constitutes a pattern of negligence or incompetence
4. The applicant has not committed any acts or crimes constituting grounds for denial of licensure.

Source: http://www.mbc.ca.gov/Applicants/Physicians_and_Surgeons/
http://www.mbc.ca.gov/Applicants/Physicians_and_Surgeons/
Those are strict, and wholly appropriate standards as far as we’re concerned, and we tell any student interested in California that asks that it will be their threshold to practice there. New York’s threshold is much more accessible, you just need three years of ACGME-approved postgraduate training and your school needs to have ECFMG approval (which Trinity has).

Source: http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/med/medlic.htm

"If a school is on neither list, then you won't get a license in CA or NY. Other states may allow you a license as long as the school isn't disapproved. If you want to work in NY or CA, go to a school that's approved there. Don't forget that this includes all residency programs in those states also."

Regarding, “if a school is on neither list, then you won’t get a license in CA or NY,” see above on license portability and practicing both states.

Residency is a great thing to bring up. We haven’t had any resident in California, not yet. And we likely won’t until after we get our approval. Totally fair point, here.

However, it’s worth mentioning that New York, by nature of the “big four” lobbying muscle, is much more open to IMGs from unevaluated schools. We’ve matched quite a few residents there over the years, four just this last year (not the 800+ some schools may boast, but as we often note: we’re small.)

Look, there’s no question that the Caribbean can be a more difficult path to medicine than a US school. And students need to be as informed as possible when making that choice, as they should with any major life decision. I am saying that, right here, as an administrator of a Caribbean school.

However, respectfully, it is not as bad as it is often represented as being. Furthermore, Caribbean governments and the US gov’t are working together every year to streamline the connection, handle schools with less-than-best-intentions, and make it easier for the schools and students operating in good faith to achieve their respective goals.

Oh, and medyexpress? Thanks for asking a great question. Whether you end up with Trinity or somewhere else, we wish you the best.
 
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NotAProgDirector

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Thanks for the great response and answers. I'm happy to be corrected. My knowledge of all of this is "what you can read on the internet", you're in the thick of it and that's very helpful.

I do agree that the Carib is not all doom and gloom. Lots of students get their training in the Carib, come to the US for residency, and have great careers. There's no question that there is some risk -- the drop out / fail out rate is (in general) higher, and those students who squeak by might find getting a spot difficult. Carib grads are often limited in field choice -- getting one of the very competitive fields is very rare and difficult.

The debate usually comes down to whether one considers the Carib schools to:
1. Give students who didn't make the cut for MD/DO schools a second chance to prove their performance and become a physician, or
2. Prey on students who are willing to gamble anything on a chance to be a physician, and misrepresent (or obfuscate) their ultimate placement/graduation statistics to give students a false sense of hope and make a profit.

The truth is probably somewhere between those two extremes, and some schools will be closer to one pole than the other. As a new school has a shorter track record, it's hard to make any assessment. That said, your brief participation here, in this thread, is more than we've seen from most other Carib schools. And that's at least a hopeful sign, and I thank you for your input.
 
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