Apr 29, 2012
7
0
Status
Medical Student
In the next week or so, my SO and I will be making a decision for him to move to the bay area for residency (not a medicine residency). I am an MS-3 trying to assess my chances at matching at a program in this area, as this is a huge factor in our decision. Specifically, I am looking at Stanford, UCSF, CHO (Kaiser Permanente lower on the list but definitely still an option). In terms of my stats
- Very good medical school, but not in the top 10 or anything. Not coming from the California system or the north east.
- Step 1: 240
- Publications: 4 (2 basic science, 2 clinical), plus awards at poster presentations. Working on a peds case report.
- St Jude Childrens Research Hospital NIH funded summer research program during medical school
- Several leadership positions and long history of peds-heme onc involvement.
- Really don't have 3rd year grades yet.
- will definitely do two external rotations at these schools

Any help would be greatly appreciated!! thank you!
 

physicsnerd42

Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2006
899
95
Status
Resident [Any Field]
You likely have a good chance of matching somewhere in Northern California, especially if you include Kaiser Oakland, CHO and UC Davis. You likely have a decent shot at Stanford or UCSF, but the application is more than just numbers so it can be hard to predict.
 

Step Up

7+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2010
65
31
Status
Resident [Any Field]
If you get honors in ur pedi rotation and sub-I then the answer is a likely yes (why wouldn't they?!). You clearly have an excellent resume, but like it or not, in general the most important factor for these top pediatric programs are clinical grades in pedi rotations. Regardless, I agree that away rotations at these programs is a good idea in your case. That way they get to know you better and more people can vouch for you in the application process.
 

GoSpursGo

Allons-y!
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Sep 30, 2008
29,032
2,201
32
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
I think you're right there in terms of competitiveness for these types of programs. Nothing is ever guaranteed at UCSF or Stanford, but you should be competitive, particularly if you can get an "in" via an away rotation.
 

physicsnerd42

Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2006
899
95
Status
Resident [Any Field]
One word of caution: away rotations have a chance to help and a chance to hurt. Some people seem better on paper than they do in person, especially if they go to a new place with an unfamiliar system for their away. Some people actually sink their chances with an away, because it really is a month-long interview and you have to be on your game every day. Away rotations should be done if a place is a real reach or if you know you can do well on the rotation. I did no aways and it didn't hurt me.