ChatGPT for med school essays

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operaman

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Maybe everyone has seen this but I’m still nerding out about it. It’s the new free chatbot thing from open AI. I keep finding more and more uses for this thing, but really wish I had it years ago when applying to med school and slogging through secondaries in particular.

Just to test it I looked up some secondary questions copy/pasted the prompts with minimal guidance. Here’s what it’s given me so far:

————
I typed in:
Write an essay for an application to the university of Michigan school of medicine that responds to the following prompt:

Comment on how you hope to impact medicine in the future. If examples are needed, feel free to refer to our seven Paths of Excellence. Do not exceed 1500 characters including spaces (about 250 words).
2 / 2

And it gave me:

As a future physician, I hope to impact medicine by advancing knowledge and expertise in the field through research and innovation. One way I hope to do this is by contributing to the Path of Excellence in Precision Health, which focuses on developing personalized treatment plans for patients. By combining my passion for science and technology with my desire to improve patient care, I hope to help develop more effective and targeted therapies that improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

Another way I hope to impact medicine is by providing high-quality care to underserved communities. As a member of the Path of Excellence in Community Engagement and Health Equity, I hope to work with community partners to address health disparities and improve access to care for marginalized populations. By combining my passion for social justice with my medical training, I hope to help create a more inclusive and equitable healthcare system.

Ultimately, my goal is to become a leader in the field of medicine and to use my knowledge and expertise to drive positive change. Whether through research, community engagement, or other means, I hope to make a lasting impact on the field of medicine and improve the lives of patients.

——————

You can even give it feedback and it will rewrite it instantly. And you can query multiple times and get a different paper each time.

Here’s another one from Vandy’s secondary. I gave it a hypothetical to try and generate a more specific essay.

—————
My input to the bot:

Write an essay for a 22 year old man from Oklahoma applying to medical school. The essay must answer the following prompt:

Please reflect on the upbringing, background, and experiences in your life that have shaped who you are as a person and will help define the person you want to be in the future. In other words, what makes you who you are? (800 words)

It wrote:

As a 22-year-old man from Oklahoma, my upbringing, background, and experiences have all played a significant role in shaping who I am as a person and will continue to define the person I want to be in the future.
Growing up in Oklahoma, I was raised in a small town with a tight-knit community. My parents instilled in me the values of hard work, dedication, and compassion. From a young age, I was taught the importance of helping others and giving back to my community. This mindset has stayed with me throughout my life and is something that I strive to embody in everything I do.

In high school, I was heavily involved in extracurricular activities, including sports, music, and community service projects. I was a member of the football team and the marching band, and I also volunteered at a local soup kitchen and helped organize fundraising events for various charities. These experiences taught me the value of teamwork, leadership, and selflessness, and they also helped me to develop a strong work ethic and determination to succeed.

After graduating high school, I attended the University of Oklahoma, where I earned a Bachelor's degree in biology. My time at OU was a transformative experience, both academically and personally. I was exposed to a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry and physics to genetics and biochemistry. I also had the opportunity to conduct research in a genetics lab and to participate in a mentorship program, where I was paired with a practicing physician who helped guide me on my path to medical school.

Throughout my time at OU, I also had the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the medical field through various internships and volunteer opportunities. I worked as an intern at a local hospital, where I was able to observe and assist with medical procedures, and I also volunteered at a free clinic, where I helped provide medical care to underserved populations. These experiences gave me a deep appreciation for the art and science of medicine, and they also solidified my desire to pursue a career as a physician.

In addition to my academic and professional experiences, I have also been influenced by my personal experiences and the people in my life. I am the youngest of three siblings, and growing up with older brothers taught me the importance of perseverance, resilience, and determination. My parents, who are both hardworking and dedicated individuals, have also been a constant source of support and encouragement throughout my life. They have instilled in me the values of honesty, integrity, and compassion, and have always encouraged me to pursue my dreams and goals.

As I reflect on the upbringing, background, and experiences in my life that have shaped who I am as a person, I am grateful for the opportunities and challenges that have come my way. These experiences have taught me the importance of hard work, dedication, and compassion, and have helped me to develop the skills and qualities that I believe are essential for a successful career in medicine. I am confident that my upbringing and experiences will continue to shape and define the person I want to be in the future, and I am excited to embark on this journey to become a physician.

———————-

Great writing? Not really. Not bad for 15 seconds of work though! I’m finding the bot helpful for generating ideas and structure and giving me something I can edit. You can also give the bot feedback and ask for a rewrite and it will do it. For someone slogging through a stack of secondaries, this could be a huge time saver.

Anyone else already using this thing?

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My input to the bot:

Write an essay for a 22 year old man from Oklahoma applying to medical school. The essay must answer the following prompt:

Please reflect on the upbringing, background, and experiences in your life that have shaped who you are as a person and will help define the person you want to be in the future. In other words, what makes you who you are? (800 words)

It wrote:

As a 22-year-old man from Oklahoma, my upbringing, background, and experiences have all played a significant role in shaping who I am as a person and will continue to define the person I want to be in the future.
Growing up in Oklahoma, I was raised in a small town with a tight-knit community. My parents instilled in me the values of hard work, dedication, and compassion. From a young age, I was taught the importance of helping others and giving back to my community. This mindset has stayed with me throughout my life and is something that I strive to embody in everything I do.

In high school, I was heavily involved in extracurricular activities, including sports, music, and community service projects. I was a member of the football team and the marching band, and I also volunteered at a local soup kitchen and helped organize fundraising events for various charities. These experiences taught me the value of teamwork, leadership, and selflessness, and they also helped me to develop a strong work ethic and determination to succeed.

After graduating high school, I attended the University of Oklahoma, where I earned a Bachelor's degree in biology. My time at OU was a transformative experience, both academically and personally. I was exposed to a wide range of disciplines, from chemistry and physics to genetics and biochemistry. I also had the opportunity to conduct research in a genetics lab and to participate in a mentorship program, where I was paired with a practicing physician who helped guide me on my path to medical school.

Throughout my time at OU, I also had the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the medical field through various internships and volunteer opportunities. I worked as an intern at a local hospital, where I was able to observe and assist with medical procedures, and I also volunteered at a free clinic, where I helped provide medical care to underserved populations. These experiences gave me a deep appreciation for the art and science of medicine, and they also solidified my desire to pursue a career as a physician.

In addition to my academic and professional experiences, I have also been influenced by my personal experiences and the people in my life. I am the youngest of three siblings, and growing up with older brothers taught me the importance of perseverance, resilience, and determination. My parents, who are both hardworking and dedicated individuals, have also been a constant source of support and encouragement throughout my life. They have instilled in me the values of honesty, integrity, and compassion, and have always encouraged me to pursue my dreams and goals.

As I reflect on the upbringing, background, and experiences in my life that have shaped who I am as a person, I am grateful for the opportunities and challenges that have come my way. These experiences have taught me the importance of hard work, dedication, and compassion, and have helped me to develop the skills and qualities that I believe are essential for a successful career in medicine. I am confident that my upbringing and experiences will continue to shape and define the person I want to be in the future, and I am excited to embark on this journey to become a physician.

———————-

Great writing? Not really. Not bad for 15 seconds of work though! I’m finding the bot helpful for generating ideas and structure and giving me something I can edit. You can also give the bot feedback and ask for a rewrite and it will do it. For someone slogging through a stack of secondaries, this could be a huge time saver.

Anyone else already using this thing?
The backstory the AI generated with just 3 descriptors 💯.
 
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It just keeps showing you what a dumb game med school admissions is.
 
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So fed up with the hypocrisy of medical school admissions - they keep promoting DEI, yet keep adding barriers- more and more essays and tests (MMIs, Casper, PREview) - for the low income applicants. Those who have to work have no time to do all these things. Should've used Europe's system, just GPA and one standardized test plus interviews to select....
 
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I'm writing an article about it, but I want to be sure what people were using. I've seen a couple of examples now, so let me know if I have permission to use it. Granted there are other articles I have working...
 
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So fed up with the hypocrisy of medical school admissions - they keep promoting DEI, yet keep adding barriers- more and more essays and tests (MMIs, Casper, PREview) - for the low income applicants. Those who have to work have no time to do all these things. Should've used Europe's system, just GPA and one standardized test plus interviews to select....
it's an INDUSTRY.
 
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Holding this article here
If you have something substantive to write, chat bot won’t be able to do a good job because there’s no knowledge base. Say you want to write something about how the current practice of PSA screening is affecting the management of prostate cancer. Or say you want to write something about the constitutionality of gay rights and its history.

But these chatbots are perfect to write a puff piece completely devoid of any substance. Exhibit a, personal statement for medical school admissions. In a nutshell, the admissions process is run on who can write the best puff piece.
 
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It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
Seeing what it was able to produce with three baseline descriptors, how hard would it be to discern something written by this bot and a person if it was fed an accumulation of different experiences?

As an applicant, it it worrisome as the point of the writing is to expand upon your experiences and illustrate an ability to clearly articulate ideas that connect your experiences to your development as a future physician. Do you think there is a chance that this would allow a lot of applicants to circumvent that, essentially removing this component of the med-school app's purpose?
 
Seeing what it was able to produce with three baseline descriptors, how hard would it be to discern something written by this bot and a person if it was fed an accumulation of different experiences?
I don't have to. Fluff is fluff whether written by a human or a bot.
 
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I don't have to. Fluff is fluff whether written by a human or a bot.
I guess what I was asking, as a hypothetical, is whether there is a concern that bots like this will ever be able to produce things like personal statements or secondary essays that are adequate for an ADCOM to send an interview? As a member of an ADCOM, do you think that's a possibility within the next few cycles?
 
I guess what I was asking, as a hypothetical, is whether there is a concern that bots like this will ever be able to produce things like personal statements or secondary essays that are adequate for an ADCOM to send an interview? As a member of an ADCOM, do you think that's a possibility within the next few cycles?
Doubt it. Seriously. The best essays convey one's passion. The three paragraphs in the OP are simply the typical drivel you hear from pre-meds who have no exposure to Medicine.
 
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It is too early for me to comment, but I have a number of questions about that. For the last ten or so years some programs have run essays through Turnitin to detect plagiarism. But there is interest in seeing how AI could help in screening applications.
 
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I guess what I was asking, as a hypothetical, is whether there is a concern that bots like this will ever be able to produce things like personal statements or secondary essays that are adequate for an ADCOM to send an interview? As a member of an ADCOM, do you think that's a possibility within the next few cycles?
Applicants (with means) already pay to have actual humans write their PS.
 
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Yeah I haven’t played with it too much for this use case, but in others I’ve found that the more I give it feedback and ask for a rewrite, the better it gets.

For example, rather than just saying 22yo man from OK, I could also add that I worked for a big 4 consulting firm, did a medical mission to Kenya, and played the sousaphone in my college marching band. The more detail and the more personalized the output becomes.

It’s not good enough to turn in as is, but it gets the framework there and then it’s simply a matter of editing. I also find that running a query a few times gives me enough material that I can assemble some really good stuff in a matter of seconds and then spend my time fine tuning substance rather than trying to figure out how to get started.

For those of us adhd folks who find it hard to begin these kind of projects, this is a game changer.
 
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Yeah I haven’t played with it too much for this use case, but in others I’ve found that the more I give it feedback and ask for a rewrite, the better it gets.

For example, rather than just saying 22yo man from OK, I could also add that I worked for a big 4 consulting firm, did a medical mission to Kenya, and played the sousaphone in my college marching band. The more detail and the more personalized the output becomes.

It’s not good enough to turn in as is, but it gets the framework there and then it’s simply a matter of editing. I also find that running a query a few times gives me enough material that I can assemble some really good stuff in a matter of seconds and then spend my time fine tuning substance rather than trying to figure out how to get started.

For those of us adhd folks who find it hard to begin these kind of projects, this is a game changer.
For every day writing, i.e., getting your ideas across, this is a great tool. The site is down now because of too much traffic lol.

Edits: I will take it back. This AI is insane. I just asked it to write a piece to explore the relationship between Rousseau and Plato. The outcome is astonishing.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Plato were two influential philosophers who lived centuries apart, but their ideas still have a profound impact on modern thought. Both men were interested in questions of morality and political organization, and both developed complex theories about the nature of society and the individual's place within it. Despite their many differences, there are some striking similarities in the ways that Rousseau and Plato approached these issues.

One of the most significant points of overlap between the two philosophers is their belief in the idea of a "natural" state of society. For Plato, this was the ideal republic described in his famous work, The Republic. In this utopia, the city-state is organized according to a strict hierarchy, with a ruling class of philosopher-kings at the top and various other classes of citizens below them. The city is governed by strict laws and customs, and everyone is expected to play their part in maintaining the social order.

Rousseau, on the other hand, believed that the natural state of society was a much more primitive one. In his most famous work, The Social Contract, he argues that humans were originally free and equal, living in small, self-sufficient communities. Over time, however, these communities grew larger and more complex, leading to the development of the state and the emergence of inequality and oppression. For Rousseau, the solution to this problem was to return to a more natural state of society, in which individuals would be free to live their lives as they saw fit, guided only by the general will of the community.

Despite their different views of the natural state of society, both Plato and Rousseau believed that it was possible to create a just and harmonious society. For Plato, this meant strict adherence to the laws and customs of the republic, while for Rousseau it meant a return to a more primitive way of life. In both cases, the goal was to create a society in which individuals could live in harmony with one another, without the need for coercion or domination.

One of the key differences between the two philosophers, however, is their view of the individual. For Plato, the individual was secondary to the needs of the state, and he believed that individuals should be willing to sacrifice their own interests for the greater good of the community. Rousseau, on the other hand, placed great emphasis on the rights and freedoms of the individual, and he believed that individuals should be free to pursue their own happiness as long as they did not harm others. This difference in perspective is reflected in their respective theories of political organization, with Plato advocating for a hierarchical society ruled by philosopher-kings, and Rousseau arguing for a more democratic and egalitarian form of government.

Despite their many differences, there are some important similarities between the ideas of Rousseau and Plato. Both men were concerned with the nature of morality and political organization, and both believed that it was possible to create a just and harmonious society. Their different perspectives on the role of the individual and the nature of the state reflect the changing ideas of their respective historical periods, but they both continue to influence our thinking about these important issues today.
 
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For every day writing, i.e., getting your ideas across, this is a great tool. The site is down now because of too much traffic lol.

Edits: I will take it back. This AI is insane. I just asked it to write a piece to explore the relationship between Rousseau and Plato. The outcome is astonishing.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Plato were two influential philosophers who lived centuries apart, but their ideas still have a profound impact on modern thought. Both men were interested in questions of morality and political organization, and both developed complex theories about the nature of society and the individual's place within it. Despite their many differences, there are some striking similarities in the ways that Rousseau and Plato approached these issues.

One of the most significant points of overlap between the two philosophers is their belief in the idea of a "natural" state of society. For Plato, this was the ideal republic described in his famous work, The Republic. In this utopia, the city-state is organized according to a strict hierarchy, with a ruling class of philosopher-kings at the top and various other classes of citizens below them. The city is governed by strict laws and customs, and everyone is expected to play their part in maintaining the social order.

Rousseau, on the other hand, believed that the natural state of society was a much more primitive one. In his most famous work, The Social Contract, he argues that humans were originally free and equal, living in small, self-sufficient communities. Over time, however, these communities grew larger and more complex, leading to the development of the state and the emergence of inequality and oppression. For Rousseau, the solution to this problem was to return to a more natural state of society, in which individuals would be free to live their lives as they saw fit, guided only by the general will of the community.

Despite their different views of the natural state of society, both Plato and Rousseau believed that it was possible to create a just and harmonious society. For Plato, this meant strict adherence to the laws and customs of the republic, while for Rousseau it meant a return to a more primitive way of life. In both cases, the goal was to create a society in which individuals could live in harmony with one another, without the need for coercion or domination.

One of the key differences between the two philosophers, however, is their view of the individual. For Plato, the individual was secondary to the needs of the state, and he believed that individuals should be willing to sacrifice their own interests for the greater good of the community. Rousseau, on the other hand, placed great emphasis on the rights and freedoms of the individual, and he believed that individuals should be free to pursue their own happiness as long as they did not harm others. This difference in perspective is reflected in their respective theories of political organization, with Plato advocating for a hierarchical society ruled by philosopher-kings, and Rousseau arguing for a more democratic and egalitarian form of government.

Despite their many differences, there are some important similarities between the ideas of Rousseau and Plato. Both men were concerned with the nature of morality and political organization, and both believed that it was possible to create a just and harmonious society. Their different perspectives on the role of the individual and the nature of the state reflect the changing ideas of their respective historical periods, but they both continue to influence our thinking about these important issues today.
Yeah it’s amazing what I’ve been able to get it to do: business plans for a solo practice, market analyses, generating meeting agendas, writing emails, LORs, wrote a gender diversity training program for our clinics in about 5 minutes, etc.

I haven’t been able to use it clinically simply because it wasn’t trained on enough medical info to do it well yet. But that’s coming eventually.

For now, this seems almost like what I always wished a personal assistant would be. It automates so much that I can spend my time tweaking the substance so it’s actually good and accurate.

The accuracy is the main issue for me - it can generate some great BS but it’s not always as accurate as the writing would suggest. But combine that with my knowledge and understanding and it turns one hour projects into 5 minute projects.
 
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Yeah it’s amazing what I’ve been able to get it to do: business plans for a solo practice, market analyses, generating meeting agendas, writing emails, LORs, wrote a gender diversity training program for our clinics in about 5 minutes, etc.

I haven’t been able to use it clinically simply because it wasn’t trained on enough medical info to do it well yet. But that’s coming eventually.

For now, this seems almost like what I always wished a personal assistant would be. It automates so much that I can spend my time tweaking the substance so it’s actually good and accurate.

The accuracy is the main issue for me - it can generate some great BS but it’s not always as accurate as the writing would suggest. But combine that with my knowledge and understanding and it turns one hour projects into 5 minute projects.
But you can direct it whichever way you want. It can even write convincing poems based on certain poet style. Simply mind boggling. I got it to write a letter to ask donation for a theater company of which I am a member… the result beats anyone I have ever hired to do the same.
 
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But you can direct it whichever way you want. It can even write convincing poems based on certain poet style. Simply mind boggling. I got it to write a letter to ask donation for a theater company of which I am a member… the result beats anyone I have ever hired to do the same.
Yeah I threw some grant writing prompts at it and it generated some really good material. And now I’ve shared it with all my arts admin friends who are just blown away by it.

Yeah I also played with the poetry side. It writes good stuff. Then I’d have it redo it like Whitman, or Keats, or even Shakespeare. Then I had it rewrite it in iambic pentameter. Wasn’t perfect but darn close for the few seconds it took to do it!

Then I asked it to write a story for an opera based on a few parameters. Then asked it for a list of musical numbers to fill 2 acts with 2 scenes each. Then I had it write lyrics for each music number.

I haven’t tried it yet but I’ll bet I can get it to write lyrics with a given metrical format that will align with whatever piece of music I want to put there. Absolutely mind blowing for something so new that will only get better.
 
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Would chatGPT causes many physicians their jobs, and which specialties? It surely will eliminate a large portion (> 50%) of software programmer's jobs.
 
Would chatGPT causes many physicians their jobs, and which specialties? It surely will eliminate a large portion (> 50%) of software programmer's jobs.
Well, I think there’s AI that can do most of the diagnostic reasoning now. But the actual management of the patient still needs physician to carry it out. I really don’t know why AI can’t completely replace radiology. For example, an internist reads a rad report and determine what the plan should be. Why would an internist trust a human reading more than an AI reading?
 
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I have to say I am severely impressed by the AI bot. I asked it the following: "write an essay for a medical school personal statement". It spit out the following in mere seconds. Absolutely mind blowing for AI that will get better.

As I reflect on my decision to pursue a career in medicine, I am filled with a sense of excitement and anticipation. From a young age, I have been drawn to the challenges and rewards of a career in healthcare, and I am confident that I have the passion, dedication, and skills to excel as a doctor.

Growing up, I was exposed to the world of medicine through my parents, both of whom are doctors. I was fascinated by their work and the positive impact they had on the lives of their patients. I also had the opportunity to volunteer at a local hospital, where I gained valuable experience working with patients and observing medical procedures.

In college, I pursued a degree in biology and continued to volunteer at the hospital. I also conducted research in the field of neuroscience, which further sparked my interest in the human body and its ability to heal.

As I move forward with my medical education, I am eager to continue learning and growing as a healthcare professional. I am confident that my experiences and skills have prepared me for the challenges of medical school, and I am excited to take the next step in my journey to become a doctor.

In addition to my passion for medicine, I also possess a strong set of personal qualities that make me a strong candidate for medical school. I am a dedicated and hardworking individual, and I am committed to lifelong learning and professional development. I am also a compassionate and empathetic person, and I believe that these qualities are essential for a successful career in healthcare.

I am confident that my passion for medicine, my dedication to learning, and my personal qualities make me a strong candidate for medical school. I look forward to the opportunity to continue my education and training, and to make a positive impact on the lives of others as a doctor.
 
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Well, I think there’s AI that can do most of the diagnostic reasoning now. But the actual management of the patient still needs physician to carry it out. I really don’t know why AI can’t completely replace radiology. For example, an internist reads a rad report and determine what the plan should be. Why would an internist trust a human reading more than an AI reading?
I think computers will replace doctors right AFTER they replace patients. Till then, sinply too much humanity involved.

But agreed that AI can and will play a growing role in healthcare. I see it for now as more of a force multiplier. A radiologist with good AI can probably read more studies and less time, for example. And maybe it would help the abysmally bad nighthawk radiologists we have doing the overnight stat reads here because it’s painfully bad.

For the rest of us I think it will help but the hardest part of my job is not something i think a computer can ever do well: form a relationship with a patient such that they will confide in me and trust me enough to allow me to operate on them. There’s something so inherently human about that, about needing to sense the trust and competence and I think the inhumanity of a bot won’t be able to overcome that.

Diagnosis is easy 99% of the time. It’s the part after that where the challenge begins.

Where I think ChatGPT or something similar could help me would be when it can listen to my patient recount the history and then type up a concise HPI for me, as well as pre fill the appropriate exam template based on the complaint, then listen to me describe what I see and amend accordingly. Then listen to our discussion and document A&P, and even review the encounter for maximal billing, whether that’s total time spent or whether it’s by medical complexity or whatever. I think that’s really close and would be a huge game changer - essentially a good scribe that never quits to go to medical school. I could probably see 30% more patients a day and be happier and home earlier with tech that would do this.
 
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Agreed that customer/patient facing jobs are least/last likely to be replaced by AI. Still I can see in the foreseeable future that AI chatbots will be so good/humanized that a significant portion of customers/patients may prefer to deal with bots than humans.
 
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AI Chat bots already exist as many businesses have adopted this into their websites including university admissions offices. You could get smarter bots on phone calls before you get to a CSR.
 
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Agreed that customer/patient facing jobs are least/last likely to be replaced by AI. Still I can see in the foreseeable future that AI chatbots will be so good/humanized that a significant portion of customers/patients may prefer to deal with bots than humans.
Looking at crisis text lines...
 
I have to say I am severely impressed by the AI bot. I asked it the following: "write an essay for a medical school personal statement". It spit out the following in mere seconds. Absolutely mind blowing for AI that will get better.

As I reflect on my decision to pursue a career in medicine, I am filled with a sense of excitement and anticipation. From a young age, I have been drawn to the challenges and rewards of a career in healthcare, and I am confident that I have the passion, dedication, and skills to excel as a doctor.

Growing up, I was exposed to the world of medicine through my parents, both of whom are doctors. I was fascinated by their work and the positive impact they had on the lives of their patients. I also had the opportunity to volunteer at a local hospital, where I gained valuable experience working with patients and observing medical procedures.

In college, I pursued a degree in biology and continued to volunteer at the hospital. I also conducted research in the field of neuroscience, which further sparked my interest in the human body and its ability to heal.

As I move forward with my medical education, I am eager to continue learning and growing as a healthcare professional. I am confident that my experiences and skills have prepared me for the challenges of medical school, and I am excited to take the next step in my journey to become a doctor.

In addition to my passion for medicine, I also possess a strong set of personal qualities that make me a strong candidate for medical school. I am a dedicated and hardworking individual, and I am committed to lifelong learning and professional development. I am also a compassionate and empathetic person, and I believe that these qualities are essential for a successful career in healthcare.

I am confident that my passion for medicine, my dedication to learning, and my personal qualities make me a strong candidate for medical school. I look forward to the opportunity to continue my education and training, and to make a positive impact on the lives of others as a doctor.
As a start, it is impressive. It also is a great example of "tell, don't show". With additional input, it can improve.

I'm seeing others type in secondary prompts and getting interesting results.

Talk about a force that will push for more SJTs.
 
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This will increase output expectations by a factor of 12.
I also expect the return of the dreaded on-site proctored essay during on-campus admissions interviews. I'm not exactly sure yet about how this would work with virtual, but I'm sure there will be something (online MMI platforms like Kira Talent already have the security to do this). One can easily set up a written MMI station. Then you can use an AI bot to compare the submitted essays versus proctored, similar to how Turnitin works.
 
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I think computers will replace doctors right AFTER they replace patients. Till then, sinply too much humanity involved.

But agreed that AI can and will play a growing role in healthcare. I see it for now as more of a force multiplier. A radiologist with good AI can probably read more studies and less time, for example. And maybe it would help the abysmally bad nighthawk radiologists we have doing the overnight stat reads here because it’s painfully bad.

For the rest of us I think it will help but the hardest part of my job is not something i think a computer can ever do well: form a relationship with a patient such that they will confide in me and trust me enough to allow me to operate on them. There’s something so inherently human about that, about needing to sense the trust and competence and I think the inhumanity of a bot won’t be able to overcome that.

Diagnosis is easy 99% of the time. It’s the part after that where the challenge begins.

Where I think ChatGPT or something similar could help me would be when it can listen to my patient recount the history and then type up a concise HPI for me, as well as pre fill the appropriate exam template based on the complaint, then listen to me describe what I see and amend accordingly. Then listen to our discussion and document A&P, and even review the encounter for maximal billing, whether that’s total time spent or whether it’s by medical complexity or whatever. I think that’s really close and would be a huge game changer - essentially a good scribe that never quits to go to medical school. I could probably see 30% more patients a day and be happier and home earlier with tech that would do this.
Agree with the HPI and all that being typed concisely and succinctly right at the bedside. Again whether AI can replace us has a lot to do with trust as you said. It’s the fundamental hurdle in autonomous driving as well.
 
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I also expect the return of the dreaded on-site proctored essay during on-campus admissions interviews. I'm not exactly sure yet about how this would work with virtual, but I'm sure there will be something (online MMI platforms like Kira Talent already have the security to do this). One can easily set up a written MMI station. Then you can use an AI bot to compare the submitted essays versus proctored, similar to how Turnitin works.
Again why do we care if it’s Ai or the student who wrote the essay if the content is truthful. No one has to write anything for work in medicine in a way more than what high schooler needed to write. Being an attorney and asset manager in my previous life, I have to say most MD’s are horribly illiterate when it comes to writing. Yet we as a group still function fine. So why do you expect applicants to be able to compose a beautiful essay in 30 mins?
 
Again why do we care if it’s Ai or the student who wrote the essay if the content is truthful. No one has to write anything for work in medicine in a way more than what high schooler needed to write. Being an attorney and asset manager in my previous life, I have to say most MD’s are horribly illiterate when it comes to writing. Yet we as a group still function fine. So why do you expect applicants to be able to compose a beautiful essay in 30 mins?
No arguments there. But there is an expectation with a graduate and professional degree to show writing skills/written communication competency (one of the AAMC preprofessional competencies). We have lived in an anti plagiarism environment when it comes to integrity, and it isn't clear yet whether this tool circumvents this.
 
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No arguments there. But there is an expectation with a graduate and professional degree to show writing skills/written communication competency (one of the AAMC preprofessional competencies). We have lived in an anti plagiarism environment when it comes to integrity, and it isn't clear yet whether this tool circumvents this.
Lol. Don’t get me started on plagiarism and medicine. 99% of pubs are ripoffs of others with citations. So I don’t think AAMC should focus too much on originality.
 
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Yay... I finally was able to log into the ChatGPT site. Noting that some people have said that additional safeguards seem to have been placed, but I think it will be different with the prompts we are asking about here.

I have been submitting some prompts to see how similar they could be. Given that this community is interprofessional, I gave it some prompts that really wind up being asked here a ton just to see what the baseline response would be. Again, I think it's great as a chatbot goes to provide really simple information.

So let's do the "Google yourself" exercise:

PROMPT: Should I trust Student Doctor Network?

ANSWER 1: Student Doctor Network (SDN) is a popular online forum and resource for students and professionals in the healthcare field. While SDN can be a valuable source of information and support, it is important to remember that the content on the forum is not necessarily vetted or verified, and not all of the information you may find on the site may be accurate or reliable. As with any online forum or resource, it is important to use critical thinking and judgement when evaluating the information you find on SDN and to verify any important or significant information with multiple sources. In general, it is always a good idea to consult with trusted and reputable sources, such as your school's career center or a healthcare professional, when seeking advice or information about careers in healthcare.

ANSWER 2: Student Doctor Network (SDN) is a well-known and respected online resource for students and professionals in the healthcare field. It is generally considered to be a reliable source of information and advice, as it is run by a team of volunteers who are committed to providing accurate and helpful information to its members. However, as with any online resource, it is always important to evaluate the information you find on SDN and other websites critically, and to verify the accuracy and credibility of the information with other sources before making any important decisions. Additionally, it is important to remember that the information and advice provided on SDN and other online forums is often based on the personal experiences and opinions of individual users, and may not be applicable to everyone. Therefore, it is always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or other trusted source before making any decisions based on information you find on SDN or other online forums.

ANSWER 3: Student Doctor Network (SDN) is a popular online forum for students and professionals in the medical field. While SDN can be a valuable resource for information and advice, it is important to remember that the information provided on the forum is not necessarily accurate or reliable. Because the forum is open to anyone, the content on SDN may not be reviewed or validated by experts, and users may not always provide accurate or up-to-date information. Additionally, the advice provided on the forum is often based on the personal experiences and opinions of other users, which may not be applicable to your individual situation.

With this in mind, it is important to approach the information on SDN with caution and to consider it as one potential source of information among many. It may be helpful to consult other reliable sources, such as your academic advisor or healthcare provider, to verify the accuracy of the information you find on SDN and to ensure that it is relevant to your situation.

ANSWER 4: Student Doctor Network (SDN) is a popular online forum for students and professionals in the medical field. It is a valuable resource for those interested in pursuing a career in healthcare, as it provides a wealth of information and support from others in the field. However, it is important to remember that the information and advice on SDN is provided by other users of the forum, and may not always be accurate or complete. Therefore, it is important to exercise caution when using information from SDN and to verify any information that you receive through other reliable sources before making important decisions based on it. Additionally, it is always a good idea to seek guidance and advice from qualified professionals, such as your academic advisor or a healthcare provider, when making important decisions about your education or career.

ANSWER 5: Student Doctor Network (SDN) is a website that provides a variety of resources and forums for students and professionals in the healthcare field. While SDN can be a valuable resource for many people, it is important to keep in mind that the information and advice provided on the site is not always accurate or reliable. Some users may have outdated or incorrect information, or may have different opinions and experiences than you do. As with any online resource, it is important to use your own judgment and to verify any information you find on SDN with other reliable sources before making any decisions based on it. Additionally, it may be helpful to speak with your academic advisor or other healthcare professionals to get advice and guidance on your specific situation.
 
Now let's have some fun.

PROMPT: Should I trust Student Doctor Network? Give your answer as a poem.
ANSWER: Here is a short poem that addresses the question of whether to trust Student Doctor Network:

Student Doctor Network is a site,
Where healthcare students can unite,
To share information and advice,
And seek guidance in their lives.

But while it can be a helpful resource,
Not all the information is congruent,
So use your critical thinking skills,
To verify and evaluate the facts.

Trust not just what you see,
But consider all sides carefully,
And use your own judgment,
To determine what is true and right.

Remember, not all that glitters,
Is gold, so don't be a quitter,
And always seek out multiple views,
To make the best decisions for you.

ANSWER 2:
Student Doctor Network can be a great resource,
But not all the information there is true,
So be sure to use your critical thinking skills,
And verify the information you find,
To make sure it's accurate and reliable,
Before you make any decisions based on it,
And trust in your own judgment and insights,
As you seek knowledge and truth.

ANSWER 3:
When seeking answers on SDN,
Be sure to use your mind,
And think critically about what you find.
Not all advice is sound,
So be sure to verify and review,
And use your own judgment to see it through.
Don't just take things at face value,
But consider all sides and be resolute,
In your search for information that's true.

ANSWER 4:
Student Doctor Network, oh what to do?
Some say it's a valuable resource,
While others say it's not so true.
So before you trust what you read,
Be sure to think critically and heed,
Other sources and opinions too.
Verify the information you find,
And use your own judgment and mind,
To determine what is right for you.
Only then can you be sure,
That the advice you follow is pure,
And will lead you on the path you choose.

ANSWER 5:
Student Doctor Network, oh how great,
A wealth of knowledge to peruse and debate.
But with so much information to be found,
It's important to use your critical thinking ground.
Not all advice is reliable,
So verify and review with care,
And use your own judgment, beyond compare.
Trust, but verify, as they say,
And you'll be on your way,
To making informed decisions each day.
 
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PROMPT: Should I accept my offer to a DO school or re-apply to get into an MD school?

ANSWER 1:
Deciding whether to accept an offer to a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) school or to re-apply to get into a Doctor of Medicine (MD) school can be a difficult decision. Ultimately, the decision will depend on your individual goals, preferences, and circumstances. Some things to consider when making this decision include:
  • The main difference between DO and MD schools is the approach to medical care. DO schools focus on treating the whole person and considering the interconnection between the body's systems, while MD schools focus on the traditional biomedical model of medicine. If you have a strong preference for one approach over the other, that may be a factor in your decision.
  • The admissions process for DO and MD schools can vary, so it is important to consider the likelihood of being accepted to an MD school if you decide to re-apply. If you have a competitive application and strong academic and extracurricular background, you may have a good chance of being accepted to an MD school. However, if you were not accepted to an MD school previously, it may be more difficult to get in the second time around.
  • The length and cost of the program can also be a factor. DO programs are typically shorter and less expensive than MD programs, so if cost is a concern for you, that may be a consideration in your decision.
  • Finally, it is important to consider your career goals and the opportunities that may be available to you after graduation. DO and MD graduates have similar career options, but there may be some differences in the opportunities available, depending on the field you choose and the location you plan to practice. It may be helpful to speak with professionals in the field and do some research to learn more about the differences between DO and MD graduates.
Ultimately, the decision is yours to make, and it is important to weigh all of the factors carefully before making a decision. You may also want to speak with your academic advisor, healthcare professionals, and other mentors to get their advice and guidance on the decision.

ANSWER 2:
Deciding whether to accept an offer to attend a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) school or to reapply to get into an allopathic medical school (MD) is a personal decision that will depend on your individual goals and circumstances. Some factors to consider when making this decision include:

  • Your career goals and the type of medical practice you want to pursue. DOs and MDs are both licensed to practice medicine, but they may have different training and approaches to healthcare.
  • The reputation and opportunities available at the specific DO and MD schools you have been accepted to.
  • Your financial situation and the cost of attending each school.
  • Your overall chances of being accepted to an MD school if you choose to reapply.
Ultimately, the best decision will depend on your individual goals and circumstances. It may be helpful to speak with advisors and professionals in the field, as well as current and former students at the schools you are considering, to get a better idea of the differences between DO and MD programs and which option may be the best fit for you.
 
The possibilities are endless.

PROMPT: Can you write for me a blues song about getting placed on an alternate list to medical school?

ANSWER 1: Here is a blues-style song about being placed on an alternate list for medical school:

Verse 1:
I worked so hard, and I gave it my all,
But now I'm stuck on the alternate list, and I'm feeling so small.
I studied for hours, and I gave it my best,
But now my dream of being a doctor is put to the test.

Chorus:
Oh, alternate list, why did you have to choose me?
I was so close to my dream, now I'm stuck on the sidelines, can't you see?
I wanted to help people, and make a difference in their lives,
But now I'm stuck waiting, and I'm filled with doubts and strife.

Verse 2:
I keep checking my phone, hoping for some good news,
But the days keep passing, and I'm feeling the blues.
I don't know what to do, should I wait it out, or move on?
The uncertainty is killing me, and my confidence is gone.

Chorus:
Oh, alternate list, why did you have to choose me?
I was so close to my dream, now I'm stuck on the sidelines, can't you see?
I wanted to help people, and make a difference in their lives,
But now I'm stuck waiting, and I'm filled with doubts and strife.

Bridge:
But I won't give up, I'll keep pushing on,
For I know that I have what it takes to be a doctor, and I won't be gone.
I'll keep working hard, and stay true to my goal,
And one day, I'll get my acceptance letter, and I'll finally be whole.

Chorus:
Oh, alternate list, you may have slowed me down,
But I won't let you stop me, I'll keep pushing till I reach my crown.
I'll keep working hard, and stay true to my dream,
And one day, I'll be a doctor, and my struggles will be a distant memory.

ANSWER 2: Here is a blues-style song about being placed on an alternate list for medical school:

Verse 1:
I thought I had it all figured out,
My future set, without a doubt.
But then I got the news,
And my world came crashing down.

Chorus:
I'm on the alternate list,
My dreams put on hold.
I thought I had it in the bag,
But now I'm feeling old.

Verse 2:
I worked so hard, day and night,
To make it into med school, it was my life.
But now I'm stuck in limbo,
My future uncertain, oh what a plight.

Chorus:
I'm on the alternate list,
My dreams put on hold.
I thought I had it in the bag,
But now I'm feeling old.

Bridge:
I know I shouldn't give up,
But it's hard to keep the faith.
I'll keep on trying,
And hope that my dream comes true.

Chorus:
I'm on the alternate list,
My dreams put on hold.
I thought I had it in the bag,
But now I'm feeling old.
But I won't give up, I'll keep on trying,
For my dream of being a doctor, I won't stop crying.
I'll keep on pushing, and hope for the best,
And maybe one day, I'll pass the test.

Outro:
I'm on the alternate list,
But I won't give up the fight.
I'll keep on pushing, and hope for the best,
And maybe one day, I'll pass the test.
 
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Oh my god!
ChatGPT prompt: Write a short story about an admissions committee debate on admitting a cat into medical school.


The admissions committee sat around the large conference table, each member flipping through the thick stack of applications in front of them. The room was silent except for the occasional sound of a page turning.

"I don't know about this one," said the committee chair, holding up a particular application. "It's for a cat."

There was a murmur of surprise around the table.

"A cat?" said one of the members. "Surely you must be joking."

"I'm not joking," said the chair. "It seems that this cat has completed all of the necessary pre-med coursework and has even conducted research at a prestigious university. And from what I can see, its grades are impeccable."

"But a cat?" said another member, shaking her head. "How could a cat possibly be qualified to become a doctor?"

"I know it sounds absurd," said the chair, "but the requirements for admission to this medical school are based solely on merit. If this cat has met those requirements, then we must consider it for admission."

The other members of the committee were skeptical, but they knew that the chair was right. After a long and heated debate, they reluctantly agreed to admit the cat into the medical school.

The cat went on to become one of the top students in its class, impressing everyone with its intelligence, curiosity, and drive. And when it graduated at the top of its class, it became the first cat to ever receive a medical degree.

The members of the admissions committee were amazed by the cat's accomplishments and were glad that they had given it a chance. And from that day on, they vowed to always base their decisions on merit alone, regardless of who (or what) the applicant might be.

PROMPT: In the form of a Steven King story.

... The other members of the committee were skeptical, but they knew that the chair was right. After a long and heated debate, they reluctantly agreed to admit the cat into the medical school.

As the cat began its studies, it quickly became clear that it was no ordinary feline. It was smart, cunning, and ruthless, using its sharp claws and teeth to claw its way to the top of the class. Its fellow students were terrified of it, and many dropped out rather than face its wrath.

But the cat didn't care. It was determined to become a doctor, no matter what the cost. And when it graduated at the top of its class, it became the first cat to ever receive a medical degree.

The members of the admissions committee were shocked by the cat's transformation, but they knew that they had made the right decision. And from that day on, they vowed to always base their decisions on merit alone, regardless of who (or what) the applicant might be.

But little did they know that the cat had only been using them, biding its time until it could unleash its true power on the world. For this was no ordinary cat. It was a creature of darkness, a harbinger of death and destruction. And it would stop at nothing to achieve its goals.

Could you write the story again like a Dr. Seuss story?

In a land far away, in a town called Med School,
Lived a cat who was smart, clever, and cool.

This cat had a dream, a dream it held dear,
To become a doctor, and help people near and far.

So it studied hard, and worked night and day,
To learn all it could, in every single way.

It took all the classes, and ace'd every test,
Until it had all the knowledge it needed, at its very best.

When the time came for applications to be sent,
The cat filled out its forms, and paid the fees it had spent.

But when the admissions committee saw the cat's name on the list,
They were shocked, and they didn't know what to say.

"A cat?" they exclaimed. "Surely you jest!"

But the cat was serious, and passed every test.

So the committee reluctantly agreed,
To admit the cat, and give it the chance it deserved to succeed.

And succeed it did, with flying colors and grace,
Becoming the top student in its class, in a very short space.

When it graduated, it was the first feline to earn a degree,
A doctor of medicine, with knowledge and skill that was key.

The admissions committee was proud, and they knew they had made the right choice,
To admit the cat, and give it a voice.

And from that day on, they vowed to always admit the best,
Regardless of species, or size, or any other kind of test.
 
Last edited:
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Speaking as a computer science major, ChatGPT is extremely impressive. However, I think much of that impressiveness comes from the training data, which comes from people. ChatGPT processed the equivalent of 120,000 bible-length books from a collection (curated by people). Its synthesis of those materials is excellent, but intrinsically I see it more like Google search than a writing tool.

Edit: On the other hand, it seems like ChatGPT is ridiculously good at polishing. “Revise the following response to a medical school prompt” might be the biggest place where it can shine.
 
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Speaking as a computer science major, ChatGPT is extremely impressive. However, I think much of that impressiveness comes from the training data, which comes from people. ChatGPT processed the equivalent of 120,000 bible-length books from a collection (curated by people). Its synthesis of those materials is excellent, but intrinsically I see it more like Google search than a writing tool.

Edit: On the other hand, it seems like ChatGPT is ridiculously good at polishing. “Revise the following response to a medical school prompt” might be the biggest place where it can shine.
Thanks for the insight!
 
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Thanks for the insight!
Happy to! Here is an example of what I mean.

A triangle's corners are colored so that every edge touches corners of two different colors. How many distinct colors does the triangle's corners have?

Since every edge of the triangle touches corners of two different colors, there must be at least three distinct colors used to color the triangle's corners. It is not possible to color the corners of a triangle with only two colors and have every edge touch corners of two different colors. Therefore, the triangle's corners must have at least three distinct colors.

Can you give an upper bound on the previous answer?

An upper bound on the number of distinct colors used to color the corners of a triangle is not possible to determine without additional information. The number of distinct colors used could be any number greater than or equal to three.

The answer is exactly 3. Could you explain why?

It is not possible to determine the exact number of colors used to color the corners of a triangle without additional information. Without knowing the size or shape of the triangle, or any other information about it, it is not possible to determine the exact number of colors used.

The answer can't be more than 3 because a triangle has at most three corners. Does that make sense?

No, that does not make sense. The number of corners a triangle has is not related to the number of colors used to color its corners.


Rather than believing someone can make a key observation about triangulations without knowing that a triangle has 3 corners, I find it more likely that the first response uses the structure of some proof it ingested.
 
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Oh my god!
ChatGPT prompt: Write a short story about an admissions committee debate on admitting a cat into medical school.


The admissions committee sat around the large conference table, each member flipping through the thick stack of applications in front of them. The room was silent except for the occasional sound of a page turning.

"I don't know about this one," said the committee chair, holding up a particular application. "It's for a cat."

There was a murmur of surprise around the table.

"A cat?" said one of the members. "Surely you must be joking."

"I'm not joking," said the chair. "It seems that this cat has completed all of the necessary pre-med coursework and has even conducted research at a prestigious university. And from what I can see, its grades are impeccable."

"But a cat?" said another member, shaking her head. "How could a cat possibly be qualified to become a doctor?"

"I know it sounds absurd," said the chair, "but the requirements for admission to this medical school are based solely on merit. If this cat has met those requirements, then we must consider it for admission."

The other members of the committee were skeptical, but they knew that the chair was right. After a long and heated debate, they reluctantly agreed to admit the cat into the medical school.

The cat went on to become one of the top students in its class, impressing everyone with its intelligence, curiosity, and drive. And when it graduated at the top of its class, it became the first cat to ever receive a medical degree.

The members of the admissions committee were amazed by the cat's accomplishments and were glad that they had given it a chance. And from that day on, they vowed to always base their decisions on merit alone, regardless of who (or what) the applicant might be.

PROMPT: In the form of a Steven King story.

... The other members of the committee were skeptical, but they knew that the chair was right. After a long and heated debate, they reluctantly agreed to admit the cat into the medical school.

As the cat began its studies, it quickly became clear that it was no ordinary feline. It was smart, cunning, and ruthless, using its sharp claws and teeth to claw its way to the top of the class. Its fellow students were terrified of it, and many dropped out rather than face its wrath.

But the cat didn't care. It was determined to become a doctor, no matter what the cost. And when it graduated at the top of its class, it became the first cat to ever receive a medical degree.

The members of the admissions committee were shocked by the cat's transformation, but they knew that they had made the right decision. And from that day on, they vowed to always base their decisions on merit alone, regardless of who (or what) the applicant might be.

But little did they know that the cat had only been using them, biding its time until it could unleash its true power on the world. For this was no ordinary cat. It was a creature of darkness, a harbinger of death and destruction. And it would stop at nothing to achieve its goals.

Could you write the story again like a Dr. Seuss story?

In a land far away, in a town called Med School,
Lived a cat who was smart, clever, and cool.

This cat had a dream, a dream it held dear,
To become a doctor, and help people near and far.

So it studied hard, and worked night and day,
To learn all it could, in every single way.

It took all the classes, and ace'd every test,
Until it had all the knowledge it needed, at its very best.

When the time came for applications to be sent,
The cat filled out its forms, and paid the fees it had spent.

But when the admissions committee saw the cat's name on the list,
They were shocked, and they didn't know what to say.

"A cat?" they exclaimed. "Surely you jest!"

But the cat was serious, and passed every test.

So the committee reluctantly agreed,
To admit the cat, and give it the chance it deserved to succeed.

And succeed it did, with flying colors and grace,
Becoming the top student in its class, in a very short space.

When it graduated, it was the first feline to earn a degree,
A doctor of medicine, with knowledge and skill that was key.

The admissions committee was proud, and they knew they had made the right choice,
To admit the cat, and give it a voice.

And from that day on, they vowed to always admit the best,
Regardless of species, or size, or any other kind of test.
For the sake of diversity, they should just admit it. After all it/she/he/they will be the most popular one in the class. And other cats need a doctor too!
 
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Especially if the cat thinks it/she/he/they is/are a human.
 
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Just substitute nursing:

Prompt:
I'm having a hard time thinking about preparing for a career in nursing. Can you tell me a story of someone who succeeded in the style of tolkien?

Answer1:
Sure, I can try to come up with a story about someone who succeeded in their nursing career in the style of J.R.R. Tolkien. Here's one possible story:

In a kingdom far, far away, there lived a young woman named Elora. She was passionate about helping others and dreamed of becoming a nurse. Despite the many challenges she faced, Elora was determined to follow her dream. She studied hard and learned everything she could about nursing, and soon she became one of the most skilled nurses in the kingdom.

Elora's dedication to her patients earned her the respect and admiration of her peers, and she quickly rose through the ranks of the nursing profession. She was known for her compassion and her ability to provide comfort and care to those in need.

One day, a great plague swept through the kingdom, and many people fell ill. Elora was called upon to help treat the sick, and she worked tirelessly to provide them with the care they needed. She used all of her knowledge and skill to help save lives, and she became known as a true hero of the kingdom.

Despite the dangers and hardships she faced, Elora remained strong and committed to her calling as a nurse. She continued to serve the people of the kingdom with dedication and compassion, and she was greatly admired for her courage and dedication.

In the end, Elora's hard work and determination paid off, and she became one of the most respected and beloved nurses in the kingdom. She had succeeded in her chosen career, and she had helped countless people along the way.
 
I think these chatbots are going to upend admissions. They make it too easy to apply to 50 schools. Let me explain.

I'm a parent who has guided 2 of my 3 kids through undergrad admissions and lurks on SDN because one of them now is interested in med school. For undergrad shotgunning applications to as many schools as you can works. Apply to 30 schools and decide in April which of your acceptances you like. My 2 oldest kids have been accepted to top schools using this method. The limiter is essay writing but after playing with the chatbot for an hour my youngest thinks she can apply to 50 schools. My kids are not the only ones that have figured this out and now schools like NYU are getting 100k+ applications, and we all know there is no way a human reads the majority of the apps.

With med schools going to virtual interviews the only limiters now are the cost of secondaries and the time to write essays, and wise chatbot usage could allow someone to apply to twice as many schools. Plus the chatbot is only going to get better at writing essays!

I think med school admissions professionals had better huddle up and make changes, otherwise they are going to follow down the path of undergrad admissions and that is a poop show. Maybe it's bringing back in person interviews, increasing ED usage, or making offers with time limits?

btw, HR departments are in the same predicament. Pretty soon it will be "easy" for someone to write a cover letter and tailor their resume to 20 jobs a day.
 
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I think these chatbots are going to upend admissions. They make it too easy to apply to 50 schools. Let me explain.

I'm a parent who has guided 2 of my 3 kids through undergrad admissions and lurks on SDN because one of them now is interested in med school. For undergrad shotgunning applications to as many schools as you can works. Apply to 30 schools and decide in April which of your acceptances you like. My 2 oldest kids have been accepted to top schools using this method. The limiter is essay writing but after playing with the chatbot for an hour my youngest thinks she can apply to 50 schools. My kids are not the only ones that have figured this out and now schools like NYU are getting 100k+ applications, and we all know there is no way a human reads the majority of the apps.

With med schools going to virtual interviews the only limiters now are the cost of secondaries and the time to write essays, and wise chatbot usage could allow someone to apply to twice as many schools. Plus the chatbot is only going to get better at writing essays!

I think med school admissions professionals had better huddle up and make changes, otherwise they are going to follow down the path of undergrad admissions and that is a poop show. Maybe it's bringing back in person interviews, increasing ED usage, or making offers with time limits?

btw, HR departments are in the same predicament. Pretty soon it will be "easy" for someone to write a cover letter and tailor their resume to 20 jobs a day.
Exactly. The general prompts for essays in the Common App lend themselves well for AI, and I'm not sure with their resources how they can tease out essays written by OTHERS let alone AI. The undergrad admissions recruiters and office staff do most of the reading.

That said, the undergrad admissions officers also can get the money to invest in an AI system of their own to screen thousands of applications (if they already haven't done so). Actually not the offices... the University top brass/president/provost/chancellor/dean level. They need it for hiring faculty, and it could be used by search firms to screen out candidates for this C-suite group.

The acquisition of Kira Talent by ETS is something I've got my ear to the ground. Kira Talent is a video-based MMI platform, so it might not surprise me that ETS's interest in creating more assessments that capture "life skills" could result in deployment of a new "game" for applicants to be integrated into the system. Could that platform also have an AI component? Stay tuned.

HR already has Applicant Tracking Systems that screen applications and resumes. Many companies also employ SJT's similar to Casper, MMI, and Kira Talent. They use chatbots on the corporation websites, so it's a matter of time ChatGPT could be used for screening interviews to deliver questions to candidates in a minimally biased fashion (candidates respond orally under proctored/secured conditions). That's what the ChatGPT platform can do very well, and if it hooks up with an ATS, you can further screen out people while still trying to maintain a large enough candidate pool for diversity goals.

In my utopian vision, that's where I think MD and grad applications will likely go. If the host university invests enough into a system that uses AI-based screening tools, the MD programs (and similar) will take advantage (whether they want to or not). Look at nursing as a trial community to this end since they cover the need to find quality candidates with appropriate soft/power skills with scientific rigor, and many undergrad and CC institutions are heavily recruiting in nursing. It will be even more critical if SCOTUS prohibits race-based factors.

You will still have some institutions like CC's that must do open enrollment, but getting into a select pre-nursing or pre-health program, including ED, could involve one of these assessments and AI analysis. How it influences decisions on admissions will be something that ought to be monitored, but I'm not certain it can be.

In the meantime, I wrote about a preliminary peek at the experience of taking SJT's and some insights on how they could be used in decisions from past cycles.

P.S. We have been discussing about the conundrum of overapplication in the residency ERAS process. Can this chatbot help applicants to further refine their responses and contribute to the over-application problem? Again, the Altus Duet and Snapshot could address this in a different way, but it would be interesting to hook it up to an AI bot. I don't see residency programs using these systems at all unless they find a way to get it budgeted through their school or hospital system.
 
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I think these chatbots are going to upend admissions. They make it too easy to apply to 50 schools. Let me explain.

I'm a parent who has guided 2 of my 3 kids through undergrad admissions and lurks on SDN because one of them now is interested in med school. For undergrad shotgunning applications to as many schools as you can works. Apply to 30 schools and decide in April which of your acceptances you like. My 2 oldest kids have been accepted to top schools using this method. The limiter is essay writing but after playing with the chatbot for an hour my youngest thinks she can apply to 50 schools. My kids are not the only ones that have figured this out and now schools like NYU are getting 100k+ applications, and we all know there is no way a human reads the majority of the apps.

With med schools going to virtual interviews the only limiters now are the cost of secondaries and the time to write essays, and wise chatbot usage could allow someone to apply to twice as many schools. Plus the chatbot is only going to get better at writing essays!

I think med school admissions professionals had better huddle up and make changes, otherwise they are going to follow down the path of undergrad admissions and that is a poop show. Maybe it's bringing back in person interviews, increasing ED usage, or making offers with time limits?

btw, HR departments are in the same predicament. Pretty soon it will be "easy" for someone to write a cover letter and tailor their resume to 20 jobs a day.
They always want more applications… the more the merrier. They don’t want a limiter. All they have to do is throw away random applications because they don’t like people who are unlucky lol. Simple.
 
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On the other hand, it's always no harder to ask AI to evaluate than to create. The most important problem in computer science / mathematics, P vs NP, asserts this and asks whether the two tasks are equally difficult. Applicants should be more scared that their essays will be screened by capricious AI readers before being sent to adcoms. For example, I plugged in my personal statement (first draft + final draft), my activities, and my WashU secondary:

Review the following essay/list from the point of view of a medical school admissions officer that has to assign an evaluation from 1 to 100:

PS First Draft: As a medical school admissions officer, I would give this essay a score of 80. The author does a good job of weaving their personal experience with family illness and the impact it had on their desire to serve others and pursue a career in medicine. The description of their clinical volunteering and research experiences provides valuable insight into their background and interests. However, the essay could benefit from more specific examples and details to help bring their experiences to life and make a stronger impact on the reader. Additionally, the author's mention of socioeconomic disparities and their impact on healthcare is a timely and relevant topic, but it is only briefly mentioned and could be further developed to provide more depth and insight.

PS Final Draft: The essay is a strong personal narrative that effectively conveys the author's passion for medicine and desire to become a physician. The author's experience with cancer and involvement with XXX provides a poignant and relatable glimpse into the author's motivation for pursuing a career in medicine. The author's involvement with YYY and interactions with physicians during clinical volunteering further showcase the author's dedication to medicine and desire to help others. Overall, the essay is well-written and effectively conveys the author's passion and commitment to medicine, making the author a strong candidate for medical school. I would give this essay an evaluation of 90/100.

Activities: As a medical school admissions officer, I would evaluate the activities and achievements listed above as follows: 7/10, 8/10, 7/10, 7/10, 7/10, 8/10, 6/10, 9/10, 8/10, 7/10, 7/10, 6/10, 7/10, 5/10 [note: it gave each activity a rating, but I cut out the names for privacy. It correctly identified with a 5/10 what I would consider the weakest activity]. As for the achievements and distinctions: Publications: 8/10, Abstracts / Posters: 7/10, Other: 8/10. Overall, the applicant has a strong record of involvement in a variety of activities, including research and volunteering, as well as a number of impressive achievements and distinctions. I would assign this applicant an overall evaluation of 76/100.

Failure Essay: This essay is a well-written reflection on the writer's experience applying to become president of XXX and their subsequent involvement in the organization. The writer demonstrates their understanding of leadership and the importance of recognizing and utilizing the strengths of team members. Additionally, the writer's experience as a YYY shows their ability to learn from their failures and apply those lessons in their work. Overall, this essay shows the writer's potential as a leader and team member, and I would assign it a score of 90.

Additional Information: As a medical school admissions officer, I would give this essay an evaluation of 85. The essay effectively demonstrates the applicant's passion for medicine and their desire to uplift others through teaching and serving. The applicant's experiences in research and the impact of their mentors are well-articulated, and their specific interest in WashU is clear. The essay could be improved by providing more concrete examples of the applicant's leadership and teaching experiences, as well as discussing any obstacles they have overcome in pursuing their passion for medicine. Overall, however, this is a strong essay that showcases the applicant's potential as a future medical professional.

What are the weaknesses of the essay/list above?

PS First Draft: One weakness of the essay is that it could benefit from more specific examples and details to help bring the author's experiences to life and make a stronger impact on the reader. Additionally, the mention of socioeconomic disparities and their impact on healthcare is only briefly mentioned and could be further developed to provide more depth and insight. The essay also jumps between topics and experiences without clearly establishing a clear structure or focus, which could make it difficult for the reader to follow and understand the author's perspective and goals.

PS Final Draft: One potential weakness of the essay is that it does not provide concrete examples of the author's specific interests or goals within the field of medicine. It would be helpful to have more detail on what specifically about medicine has drawn the author's interest, and what they hope to achieve as a physician. Additionally, the essay could benefit from discussing any specific challenges or obstacles the author has faced in pursuing a career in medicine, and how they plan to overcome these challenges.

Activities: The applicant's research experience may be somewhat limited, as they only have experience in undergraduate research positions. The applicant's shadowing experiences may not be as extensive as those of other applicants. Some of the achievements and distinctions listed are not directly relevant to the applicant's goals or the admissions process.

Failure Essay: One potential weakness of the essay above is that it does not provide specific examples of how the writer has recognized and utilized the strengths of their team members as a YYY. Additionally, the essay does not provide any information about the writer's experiences or qualifications outside of their involvement with XXX, which may limit the admissions officer's understanding of the writer's overall qualifications and potential as a medical school applicant.

Additional Information: It is difficult to identify specific weaknesses in the essay because it is well-written and effectively conveys the applicant's motivations and goals. However, one potential weakness is that the essay does not provide any specific examples or anecdotes that illustrate the applicant's experiences or personal characteristics. This could make it harder for the admissions officer to get a sense of the applicant's personality and abilities.

Based on this essay/list, would you recommend the applicant for admission?

PS First Draft: Based on this essay alone, it is difficult to make a recommendation for admission to medical school. While the essay provides some valuable insight into the author's experiences and interests, it could benefit from more specific examples and details to help bring their experiences to life and make a stronger impact on the reader.

PS Final Draft: Based on the essay, I would recommend the applicant for admission to medical school. The essay effectively conveys the author's passion for medicine and their desire to become a physician. The author's personal experiences, such as their family illness and their involvement in clinical volunteering, effectively illustrate their motivation for pursuing a career in medicine. Additionally, the essay is well-written and organized, with clear examples and engaging storytelling. While there are some areas for improvement, such as providing more detail on the author's specific interests and goals within the field of medicine, the essay overall presents a strong case for the applicant's suitability for admission to medical school.

Activities: Based on the information provided, I would recommend the applicant for admission to medical school. The applicant has a strong record of involvement in a variety of activities, including research and volunteering, as well as a number of impressive achievements and distinctions. While there may be other applicants with more extensive or relevant experience, the applicant's record suggests that they would be a strong candidate for admission to medical school.

Failure Essay: Based on the essay alone, I would recommend the applicant for admission. The essay showcases the writer's experiences, motivations, and interests, and presents a compelling case for why they would be a good fit for WashU.

Additional Information: Based on the essay above, I would recommend the applicant for admission.


It's honestly kind of crazy how fast it can review an application. It definitely reads way faster than any human and I think the comments are fairly relevant / mostly accurate.
 
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