prehealth101

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So I was just doing some general research on podiatry and residency when I came across this website and read "podiatry's biggest lies" and a few other titles in this amateur website. I just wanted to hear some opinions out there, do you think this guy is a real podiatrist as he claims or just a bored nut job?

http://www.angelfire.com/on/podiatry/
 

jays2cool4u

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He is quoting articles that are almost 10 years old, which do not hold true anymore. Ten years ago, gas in DC was below $1.50...things change.
 

Gryhu

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So I was just doing some general research on podiatry and residency when I came across this website and read "podiatry's biggest lies" and a few other titles in this amateur website. I just wanted to hear some opinions out there, do you think this guy is a real podiatrist as he claims or just a bored nut job?

http://www.angelfire.com/on/podiatry/
I'll read up on it and see if I can find a rebuttal to most of the things.
 

bdaddyjolley

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This is old news. The subject has been discussed before.
 

Sundarban1

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I'll read up on it and see if I can find a rebuttal to most of the things.
This article is synonymous to the "dubious aspects of osteopathic medicine" article that some pre-med finds and posts as if it were "news" at least once a year in the pre-osteo forum.
 

jonwill

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This article is synonymous to the "dubious aspects of osteopathic medicine" article that some pre-med finds and posts as if it were "news" at least once a year in the pre-osteo forum.
These articles generally prove two things:

1) There are miserable people in all professions

2) They like company
 

spo01

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These articles generally prove two things:

1) There are miserable people in all professions

2) They like company
right on. the most insecure people i know are the ones that have an ego and knock down other professions. it's really sad when people put down others in order to make themselves feel better.

to the OP, here is a challenge for you (and seriousely do this): browse through SDN or get on google and type in anything like "don't be a doctor!", "avoid nursing!" "unhappy physical therapists" "osteopathic doctors and quackery" "being a doctor sucks!" "never go into business" "never be a school teacher" "dentistry sucks" etc etc etc. you will find endless ranting. point being: if you go looking for trouble, you're gonna get it. if you focus on the negative things, you're going to get the negative things.
 

Buspar

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right on. the most insecure people i know are the ones that have an ego and knock down other professions. it's really sad when people put down others in order to make themselves feel better.

to the OP, here is a challenge for you (and seriousely do this): browse through SDN or get on google and type in anything like "don't be a doctor!", "avoid nursing!" "unhappy physical therapists" "osteopathic doctors and quackery" "being a doctor sucks!" "never go into business" "never be a school teacher" "dentistry sucks" etc etc etc. you will find endless ranting. point being: if you go looking for trouble, you're gonna get it. if you focus on the negative things, you're going to get the negative things.
:thumbup::thumbup:
 
OP
P

prehealth101

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you have a great point spo01, although the big difference is that most of the articles that pop up aren't written by DPTs DOs or MDs, they're usually from a third party, unlike (granted if it's true) this article. Nevertheless, I am convinced that his website isn't credible by any means or that he represents a minute minority (i know, i had to add the minute since i felt "minority" alone wouldn't do justice).
 

Feli

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...There are miserable people in all professions...
Bingo^

For the OP, some pre-pod seems to stumble across that old website and post it every few months. I can't blame you... it would scare the heck out of me too.

Since I'm a little further along in my training and have met a lot of DPMs in shadowing, clinics, conferences, etc, I can tell you firsthand that it's a great profession for those who apply themselves. Other students/residents/practitioners who have applied themselves will probably echo that sentiment. However, pod is the same as any career field: there's a bell curve of income and satisfaction levels. There are MDs working for $70k per year in some college health center or malignant inner city hospital, lawyers stuck doing assistant DA work, etc etc etc. If you aren't interested or aren't going to apply yourself in a professional field where there are many other smart and hardworking people who are giving more effort, then you will probably be one of the less successful outcomes and may be bitter. It's impossible to say what made this guy start a website and criticize his profession for all to see, but you can probably connect the dots.

The best idea for any pre-pod would pr
obably be to shadow, talk to DPMs, and figure out for yourself if it's a career you are interested in and would enjoy. If you like what you see, find a school that has what you need and is the right fit for you.
 
OP
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prehealth101

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Yea I completely agree with you Feli
And i apologize to all the sdn "veterans" out there who had to see the post of this article yet again
 

gyronyc

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Certainly there are the disgruntled populating most any profession. The good, the bad and the indifferent.

But this DPM clearly knows his subject. The health 'industry' has, and still is undergoing major changes; truly you need to gorge at the fountain of eternal hope and sublime optimism if you do not yet know the Podiatry halcyon days offering guaranteed wealth and prosperity are over. It is quite probable the same applies to other health professions. There will always be the prospective student who can stomach the new limitations, look at a profession in a different light and accept those challenges of the brave new world. In this way the profession, or at least a version of it, will surely prevail.

Yes, podiatry-bites, and sure, this website discusses topics, now some 10 years old. But in what way have things got any better since then ? Are crippling loans a thing of the past ? Has anyone found a cure for the HMO disease ? Are starting salaries now six figures instead of in the lowly 5's. Is competition no longer cut throat ?

Flick through your local yellow pages or take a walk in your neighborhood - how many Podiatrists are there? How many Podiatrists does a community need, and how many can the community support financially? Check out the vacancy columns in the journals. If folk are just plain 'selling up' ask why.

Where is the independent market research to support those overtly optimistic (school propaganda) claims. Whose advice can you actually really rely on ?
Schools are a business and need those 'bums on seats' to make money to survive, first and foremost.

And are there people other than DPM's competing for your 'foot' business ? You better believe it.

And Prehealth 101 - never apologise asking such questions. This is too important !
 

NyMets85

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Certainly there are the disgruntled populating most any profession. The good, the bad and the indifferent.

But this DPM clearly knows his subject. The health 'industry' has, and still is undergoing major changes; truly you need to gorge at the fountain of eternal hope and sublime optimism if you do not yet know the Podiatry halcyon days offering guaranteed wealth and prosperity are over. It is quite probable the same applies to other health professions. There will always be the prospective student who can stomach the new limitations, look at a profession in a different light and accept those challenges of the brave new world. In this way the profession, or at least a version of it, will surely prevail.

Yes, podiatry-bites, and sure, this website discusses topics, now some 10 years old. But in what way have things got any better since then ? Are crippling loans a thing of the past ? Has anyone found a cure for the HMO disease ? Are starting salaries now six figures instead of in the lowly 5's. Is competition no longer cut throat ?

Flick through your local yellow pages or take a walk in your neighborhood - how many Podiatrists are there? How many Podiatrists does a community need, and how many can the community support financially? Check out the vacancy columns in the journals. If folk are just plain 'selling up' ask why.

Where is the independent market research to support those overtly optimistic (school propaganda) claims. Whose advice can you actually really rely on ?
Schools are a business and need those 'bums on seats' to make money to survive, first and foremost.

And are there people other than DPM's competing for your 'foot' business ? You better believe it.

And Prehealth 101 - never apologise asking such questions. This is too important !

well this should keep some people on the the forum occupied for a few days...
 

dpmPOD

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Certainly there are the disgruntled populating most any profession. The good, the bad and the indifferent.

But this DPM clearly knows his subject. The health 'industry' has, and still is undergoing major changes; truly you need to gorge at the fountain of eternal hope and sublime optimism if you do not yet know the Podiatry halcyon days offering guaranteed wealth and prosperity are over. It is quite probable the same applies to other health professions. There will always be the prospective student who can stomach the new limitations, look at a profession in a different light and accept those challenges of the brave new world. In this way the profession, or at least a version of it, will surely prevail.

Yes, podiatry-bites, and sure, this website discusses topics, now some 10 years old. But in what way have things got any better since then ? Are crippling loans a thing of the past ? Has anyone found a cure for the HMO disease ? Are starting salaries now six figures instead of in the lowly 5's. Is competition no longer cut throat ?

Flick through your local yellow pages or take a walk in your neighborhood - how many Podiatrists are there? How many Podiatrists does a community need, and how many can the community support financially? Check out the vacancy columns in the journals. If folk are just plain 'selling up' ask why.

Where is the independent market research to support those overtly optimistic (school propaganda) claims. Whose advice can you actually really rely on ?
Schools are a business and need those 'bums on seats' to make money to survive, first and foremost.

And are there people other than DPM's competing for your 'foot' business ? You better believe it.

And Prehealth 101 - never apologise asking such questions. This is too important !
Do you have a point? The rhetorical questions you've proposed are applicable to basically any health care related field, MD/DO/DPM/DDS etc, so I'm not sure why you're attempting to single podiatry out here. Maybe you're just placing these concerns in the context of podiatry for the OP, but still, it is more than "quite probable" that the concerns you've raised ARE relevant to ANY medical field. DPM salaries have been rising, demand for podiatric care is increasing, and I'm not exactly sure who is seriously competing against DPM's for "foot business" to the point of threatening job opportunities for podiatrists, so perhaps you could enlighten me. If anything, MD/DO primary care needs to be worried about the DNP movement. There is nothing wrong with understanding the risks associated with entering a career, but like any career, podiatry is what you make it. If you're good at what you do, in any career, I'm more than certain that success will follow.
 

HenryH

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Certainly there are the disgruntled populating most any profession. The good, the bad and the indifferent.

But this DPM clearly knows his subject. The health 'industry' has, and still is undergoing major changes; truly you need to gorge at the fountain of eternal hope and sublime optimism if you do not yet know the Podiatry halcyon days offering guaranteed wealth and prosperity are over. It is quite probable the same applies to other health professions. There will always be the prospective student who can stomach the new limitations, look at a profession in a different light and accept those challenges of the brave new world. In this way the profession, or at least a version of it, will surely prevail.

Yes, podiatry-bites, and sure, this website discusses topics, now some 10 years old. But in what way have things got any better since then ? Are crippling loans a thing of the past ? Has anyone found a cure for the HMO disease ? Are starting salaries now six figures instead of in the lowly 5's. Is competition no longer cut throat ?

Flick through your local yellow pages or take a walk in your neighborhood - how many Podiatrists are there? How many Podiatrists does a community need, and how many can the community support financially? Check out the vacancy columns in the journals. If folk are just plain 'selling up' ask why.

Where is the independent market research to support those overtly optimistic (school propaganda) claims. Whose advice can you actually really rely on ?
Schools are a business and need those 'bums on seats' to make money to survive, first and foremost.

And are there people other than DPM's competing for your 'foot' business ? You better believe it.

And Prehealth 101 - never apologise asking such questions. This is too important !

How are the salaries "these days," actually? I've heard that most new graduates are getting six-figure offers, while there are still those apparently wallowing in the "$50k swamp."

I was reading PM News the other day and saw an ad offering $150k plus incentives to start and another one guaranteeing $100k, so the financial climate must be improving...right?
 

Poder8ter

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:thumbup::thumbup: gyronyc does have a point right? Life (and for that matter your career) is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

But guess what gyronyc, either way I'm eating choclate so what do I care.

dpmPOD has the most valid point of all. Any field in the world will have hecklers and people that try to down what others believe is good. It would be foolish to believe that every Podiatrist out there is successful but it would be even more foolish to shy away from such a great profession becasue of the exception.

I will ascertain till the day I die that we are going into the most important field in life. Healthcare will always be the number one priority to the majority of people simply because if you don't have your health you have nothing.
 

gyronyc

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Do you have a point? The rhetorical questions you've proposed are applicable to basically any health care related field, MD/DO/DPM/DDS etc, so I'm not sure why you're attempting to single podiatry out here..
In what way is the post 'rhetorical' ?
I did not single out podiatry - was this not clear enough?

Also, this forum is about Podiatry after all; I cannot speak for professions other than my own. But I see that you feel able to take a definitive stance and comment about other professions. Do you have personal experience? Or are you simply making assumptions?

Whilst some concerns are shared, key issues highlighted in podiatry-bites' website are very specific to the profession of Podiatry. This is good enough a reason, not to single out, but instead to focus on Podiatry issues.

Maybe you're just placing these concerns in the context of podiatry for the OP,
Meaning what ? If you have a point to make, say it.

but still, it is more than "quite probable" that the concerns you've raised ARE relevant to ANY medical field.
By this I suspect you mean the concerns that podiatry-bites has raised.

I say 'quite probable' because I do not have the benefit of direct work experience in any of those other professions. You clearly feel much more comfortable about making such a definitive statement. And I am forced to repeat myself, there are issues specifically relevant to the practice of modern Podiatry; and there may well be other areas of commonality. Podiatry-bites makes those points very effectively. It pays to look at both sides of the coin.

But on this single layer I see we can agree on.

DPM salaries have been rising, demand for podiatric care is increasing
If true, that is good news - can you provide objective meaningful, heck even scientific evidence to support this view? Demand may well increase. People will always 'want' stuff but are they prepared to pay for it? How will the HMO situation affect you, and when co-payments are demanded, will your clients want to pay up? How easy is it for the newly qualified to get on those insurance schemes? I see in your post you selected some soft targets for riposte but you managed to dodge those very important issues.

Can you progress beyond 'I heard that salaries are rising'?

and I'm not exactly sure who is seriously competing against DPM's for "foot business" to the point of threatening job opportunities for podiatrists,
Come on, give me a break, you need to be blissfully blinkered to imagine podiatry has cornered a market. The orthotist will compete for orthoses. Then you have the dermatologist, the diabetologist, the vascular surgeon, the orthopedic surgeon, nurses to provide wound care etc etc etc. In contrast, no-one competes with the dentist or the opthalmologist. I know we like to think we can do it better than everyone else (where is the evidence?), but market forces and HMO's / Insurance / Hospital privilidges (or lack of) are of key importance. You can try ignore this all you like.

Heck, even the ever pervasive pedicurist will eat into your income.


so perhaps you could enlighten me.,
Is it getting clear yet ?

There is nothing wrong with understanding the risks associated with entering a career, but like any career, podiatry is what you make it. If you're good at what you do, in any career, I'm more than certain that success will follow.
And that is a fair point and no-one would dispute. In my view what podiatry-bites has to offer is a balance to the propaganda machine that would paint too rosy a picture, and for dubious motives. Also it is just a tinge naive to imagine the individual can affect those income devouring policies surrounding HMO's, insurance schemes etc.

When all is said and done the prospective student can make an informed decision. But he/she can do so only if equipped with all of the facts and cognisant of all of the pitfalls. The problem can arise when that student relies totally on those authorities and feels let down when too late, those 'new' facts begin to emerge.

'Heckling' and 'Miserable' - well the truth can sting and life isn't always comfortable. Podiatry-bites' website should be regarded as another resource. No more no less. The information offered is from of a seasoned professional, not that of a crackpot. And that after all was Prehealth1's question.

I see nothing wrong in re-dressing the balance and giving the student some of the necessary tools (i.e. questions). It is fair to assume some of it will be new, unfamiliar, even disturbing material. It is irrelevant that it could also affect other health professions.

And if there is nothing to hide, and all is rosy, well then, the choice will be an easy (easier) one for that student who can sleep well at night knowing the right choice has (probably) been made.


I made my choice 21 years ago, and personally I have no regrets. Clearly, not everyone gets to be so lucky.

Poder8ter: Enjoy your chocolate, and save me the soft centres.:D
 

dpmPOD

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Feb 5, 2008
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In what way is the post 'rhetorical' ?
I did not single out podiatry - was this not clear enough?
You did single podiatry out, despite giving a very minor disclaimer about other fields. You could have just as easily subsituted "family practice physician" for podiatrist throughout your entire thread and the questions could have been just as applicable. Like I said, if that was done for the OP that's fine. Asking a series of questions with obvious answers makes the post rhetorical--everyone knows these are issues.

Also, this forum is about Podiatry after all; I cannot speak for professions other than my own. But I see that you feel able to take a definitive stance and comment about other professions. Do you have personal experience? Or are you simply making assumptions?
Take a stroll through the other forums on here; you will find plenty of instances of these exact same issues in other fields. I know many physicians who struggle/complain with these same issues as well.

Whilst some concerns are shared, key issues highlighted in podiatry-bites' website are very specific to the profession of Podiatry. This is good enough a reason, not to single out, but instead to focus on Podiatry issues.
Are you a podiatrist? I'm still not sure what your profession is entirely. If you are a podiatrist don't you think it would benefit the OP to actually answer these questions with your experiences rather than asking questions to which you should know the answer?

If true, that is good news - can you provide objective meaningful, heck even scientific evidence to support this view? Demand may well increase. People will always 'want' stuff but are they prepared to pay for it? How will the HMO situation affect you, and when co-payments are demanded, will your clients want to pay up? How easy is it for the newly qualified to get on those insurance schemes? I see in your post you selected some soft targets for riposte but you managed to dodge those very important issues.
"Here are some newly released statistics for income of podiatric physicians from the 2007 APMA Podiatric Practice Survey:

1. A dramatic increase in the gross incomes of practice owners was found for 2006. The median gross income in 2006 was $400,000, compared to an estimated $275,000 in 2004.
2. A much higher percentage of members reported gross incomes over $500,000 in 2006 (37%) than in 2004 (20%) and 2001 (14%).
3. Net income in 2006 increased substantially from 2004. The median net income in 2006 was $150,000, compared to an estimated $137,500 in 2004.
4. Net income in 2006 was higher for members with high volumes of total patient visits and for members with board certification from the American Board of Podiatric Surgery (ABPS)."


"Job prospects. Although the occupation is small and most podiatrists continue to practice until retirement, job opportunities should be good for entry-level graduates of accredited podiatric medicine programs. Job growth and replacement needs should create enough job openings for the supply of new podiatric medicine graduates. Opportunities will be better for board-certified podiatrists because many managed-care organizations require board certification. Newly trained podiatrists will find more opportunities in group medical practices, clinics, and health networks than in traditional solo practices. Establishing a practice will be most difficult in the areas surrounding colleges of podiatric medicine, where podiatrists concentrate."
-source, http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos075.htm US. Dept. of Labor.

There are discrepancies in the salaries listed on the US Dept. of Labor site, and in the APMA study. Take that as you will. Every podiatrist I know makes well over the figure quoted on the US. Dept of Labor site.


Come on, give me a break, you need to be blissfully blinkered to imagine podiatry has cornered a market. The orthotist will compete for orthoses. Then you have the dermatologist, the diabetologist, the vascular surgeon, the orthopedic surgeon, nurses to provide wound care etc etc etc. In contrast, no-one competes with the dentist or the opthalmologist.
Podiatry does indeed consult with other areas of medicine(vasc, derm, etc.), but this isn't something that is exclusive to podiatry. I believe any field involved in medicine refers out if something is believed to be beyond scope. Also, you're wrong about dentistry and ophthalmology.

enter the "dental therapist":
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/28/business/28teeth.html?_r=1&hp:&oref=slogin

Take a stroll through the optometry forum if you'd like to read lengthy discussions about how optometrists want their scope increased.


When all is said and done the prospective student can make an informed decision. But he/she can do so only if equipped with all of the facts and cognisant of all of the pitfalls. The problem can arise when that student relies totally on those authorities and feels let down when too late, those 'new' facts begin to emerge.

'Heckling' and 'Miserable' - well the truth can sting and life isn't always comfortable. Podiatry-bites' website should be regarded as another resource. No more no less. The information offered is from of a seasoned professional, not that of a crackpot. And that after all was Prehealth1's question.

I see nothing wrong in re-dressing the balance and giving the student some of the necessary tools (i.e. questions). It is fair to assume some of it will be new, unfamiliar, even disturbing material. It is irrelevant that it could also affect other health professions.
Nothing wrong with being informed. I just think your post needed to make it more clear that these are issues in any health care related profession; also, it coulden't have hurt to discuss the positives of the profession rather than only listing negatives. :thumbup:
 

gyronyc

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Apr 21, 2008
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You did single podiatry out, despite giving a very minor disclaimer about other fields. You could have just as easily substituted "family practice physician" for podiatrist throughout your entire thread and the questions could have been just as applicable. Like I said, if that was done for the OP that's fine. Asking a series of questions with obvious answers makes the post rhetorical--everyone knows these are issues.
Everyone doesn't know these are the issues - this is why those new curious folk are asking.

Take a stroll through the other forums on here; you will find plenty of instances of these exact same issues in other fields. I know many physicians who struggle/complain with these same issues as well.
So you keep saying over and over - it is relevant only to those wishing to enter those other professions.

Are you a podiatrist? I'm still not sure what your profession is entirely. If you are a podiatrist don't you think it would benefit the OP to actually answer these questions with your experiences rather than asking questions to which you should know the answer?
Oh my god - are you really asking this question? :laugh:


"Here are some newly released statistics for income of podiatric physicians from the 2007 APMA Podiatric Practice Survey:
1. A dramatic increase in the gross incomes of practice owners was found for 2006. The median gross income in 2006 was $400,000, compared to an estimated $275,000 in 2004.
2. A much higher percentage of members reported gross incomes over $500,000 in 2006 (37%) than in 2004 (20%) and 2001 (14%).
3. Net income in 2006 increased substantially from 2004. The median net income in 2006 was $150,000, compared to an estimated $137,500 in 2004.
4. Net income in 2006 was higher for members with high volumes of total patient visits and for members with board certification from the American Board of Podiatric Surgery (ABPS)."


Job prospects. Although the occupation is small and most podiatrists continue to practice until retirement, job opportunities should be good for entry-level graduates of accredited podiatric medicine programs. Job growth and replacement needs should create enough job openings for the supply of new podiatric medicine graduates. Opportunities will be better for board-certified podiatrists because many managed-care organizations require board certification. Newly trained podiatrists will find more opportunities in group medical practices, clinics, and health networks than in traditional solo practices. Establishing a practice will be most difficult in the areas surrounding colleges of podiatric medicine, where podiatrists concentrate."

source, http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos075.htm US. Dept. of Labor.

There are discrepancies in the salaries listed on the US Dept. of Labor site, and in the APMA study. Take that as you will. Every podiatrist I know makes well over the figure quoted on the US. Dept of Labor site.
Ok now show me independently collated figures, not mere propaganda.

Truthfully, you are charged with the task to paint this very same rosy picture, am I right?


Podiatry does indeed consult with other areas of medicine(vasc, derm, etc.), but this isn't something that is exclusive to podiatry. I believe any field bla bla bla
No, no no - not 'consult' - you are very determined, but not that successful with it, in your attempt to put your own spin on my posts. You will know those patients who will head straight past the Podiatrist's office and attend another profession.

Come on now, own up and come clean, you are being deliberately obtuse. And well practiced at the game. Who exactly are you !


Nothing wrong with being informed. I just think your post needed to make it more clear that these are issues in any health care related profession;
No, it does not need this at all. The question was about Podiatry, not any other health care profession. And the same issues do not affect all other health care professions equally or at all, but I have made this point several times, right?

also, it couldn't have hurt to discuss the positives of the profession rather than only listing negatives. :thumbup:
And once again, off target. The schools, APMA and good folk like yourself who are recruited for this, are overdoing that job already. Really, it does not need repeating. For what it's worth, I have already made clear my position and standing in this profession. If it was bad for me I would get out.

It couldn't hurt if you guys (and I suspect you are intimately involved with or sleeping partner with the provider arm of the education game) also let people know of the problems facing not only the profession but also those new into the profession; and if you like you can throw in any or all other professions in the same breath, and then at least you can provide a balanced viewpoint. You know very well that is entirely the point of the posts.

I have said all I am going to say. Hopefully there is enough information for pre-pods to decide for themselves, or at the very least to make sure the right questions get asked.

Lastly, why you wish to avoid addressing at all costs again the central issues previously listed can remain speculative.

The reader can figure it out and decide the reason for your slipperiness.

Tough points to blag about, right?

Good bye and good night.
 

dpmPOD

10+ Year Member
Feb 5, 2008
121
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So you keep saying over and over - it is relevant only to those wishing to enter those other professions.Oh my god - are you really asking this question? :laugh:
How ignorant of you! Where in any of your posts have you said "I am a podiatrist that has been practicing for 20 years"? Again you've ignored my statement where I said that if you were putting problems that all medical practitioners face in the context of podiatry, that's fine; the point of caution there was not to single podiatry out and make it seem like these problems are MORE applicable to podiatry, which in my opinion you failed to do.

Ok now show me independently collated figures, not mere propaganda.

Truthfully, you are charged with the task to paint this very same rosy picture, am I right?
You're a podiatrist! Why don't you share your own personal experiences with the forum? If podiatry is such a BAD option, why have you been doing it for so long? If it's been a good career, why not refute some of what the OP's link said? You've contributed nothing :laugh:



Come on now, own up and come clean, you are being deliberately obtuse. And well practiced at the game. Who exactly are you ! The schools, APMA and good folk like yourself who are recruited for this, are overdoing that job already. Really, it does not need repeating. For what it's worth, I have already made clear my position and standing in this profession. If it was bad for me I would get out....It couldn't hurt if you guys (and I suspect you are intimately involved with or sleeping partner with the provider arm of the education game.
Yes, clearly as a student entering podiatry school in the fall, I'm really "sleeping with the pod schools." Nice strawman argument there :laugh:.


Lastly, why you wish to avoid addressing at all costs again the central issues previously listed can remain speculative. The reader can figure it out and decide the reason for your slipperiness.
You're the one being vague here, not me. If you've been a Pod for 20 years, and have no regrets, obviously podiatry isn't such a bad career; if those salary figures I posted are so outrageous, why not share your own salary as a veteran podiatrist? You have done nothing to prove those sources I cited wrong.

So really, you've failed to defend a profession that you apparently enjoy greatly. Not once have you said "As a Podiatrist, I've had problems with X,Y,Z," and given examples or potential solutions. You've contributed little aside from very obvious questions that anyone in any career should be asking, and when called out on it you've done little aside from make asine arguments against someone who happens to be optimistic about the direction and future of podiatry, all with no proof or personal examples from your own experiences. Fail :thumbdown:.
 

zephryus14

zephyrus14
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 6, 2006
51
0
35
IL
Status
Podiatry Student
Gyronyc is the type of guy every profession can do without. He's obviously jaded and takes pleasure in being destructive and controversial. From a guy who claims to be happy with his career choice he has a lot of negative things to say. The evidence for his arguments are subjective and vague at best.

So Gyronyc, if you're really unhappy about certain aspects of the profession, why don't you get involved with the APMA and help make those changes? I'm guessing you won't, you'd prefer to sit back and criticize other's decisions instead of making some of your own. Coward.
 

Poder8ter

10+ Year Member
Dec 1, 2007
31
0
Status
Pre-Podiatry
Word :thumbup:

I kind of like what gyronyc has to say.

Keep it coming man it is good motivation for me. There will always be opposition when it comes to good things. Why should podiatry be any different?

Keep telling me how we are inferior and blind in our choices to pursue what we feel is right and good.

I am sure we have all had people telling us how we are so stupid for going into the medical field. After all cops are really dumb for going into law enforcement because they might be killed. Firefighters are so dumb for doing what they do because they might be burned. And teachers are so blind for going into education because they don't make enough money.

Guess what America wouldn't be America without the haters.

And Kudos to anyone who follows their ambitions even in the wake of opposition.