Class selection: "Intro" or "General"

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by tpcooper, May 14, 2008.

  1. tpcooper

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    First of all, I am SURE this has been answered in some message somewhere else, but I have tried searching and have not found a clear answer. Secondly, I am needing to start taking classes at a CC with no real pre-med advisor.

    In Biology, Physics, and Chemistry my school offers an "Introduction to..." and a "General..." Both have labs. I am guessing I need to take for example General Biology 1 and 2 as opposed to Introduction to Biology 1 and 2. The allure of the "Introduction" classes is that more of them are offered, so easier to fit aroun my schedule.

    Am I correct that Introduction to Biology, Chemistry, and Physics 1 and 2 with Lab are not okay? I need to take the classes that say General Bio, Gen Chem, and Gen Physics? I hope this question makes sense.

    Thanks,
    Patrick
     
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  3. gman33

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    You need to take the classes that are designed for science majors.
    Can't really tell based on name alone. It should say in the course description. I'm guessing that it's the "General" courses, but that may not be correct.
     
  4. RxnMan

    RxnMan Who, me? A doctor?
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    Just as a difference of opinion, I would take whichever class

    1) Fulfills your pre-reqs (class + lab)
    2) Is the easiest to get an A in

    The best thing to have on any app is as high a GPA as possible. Then MCAT. Do what you need to in order to get that A. And keep getting them.
     
  5. drimpossible

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    At my school, the general classes are for science majors whereas the intro classes are designed for people trying to fulfill a science requirement in a non-science major. I've heard the Intro to Chemistry (with lab) professor call it "baby chem". Not sure if this is the same at all schools so YMMV.
     
  6. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    Class + lab does not equate to satisfying medicall school prerequisites. If the OP took Intro to Bio, he'd find out later he's ineligible for medical school.

    OP- Ask the registrar at your school which class is designed for science majors (it's usually General, not Intro). If you take anything other than that, you will not be satisfying your prerequisites.
     
  7. Kateb4

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    Just remember that you are not only trying to satisfy the pre-req, but you also have to prepare yourself for the MCAT. An Intro class will most likely not provide you with enough information to do well on the subject matter in the MCAT. I would go for the "general" classes.
     
  8. RxnMan

    RxnMan Who, me? A doctor?
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    Huh. When I was applying, my pre-reqs were the gen chem x 1 year, orgo x 1 year, phys x 1 year, and some others. All the basic science classes had to have a lab. That's it. I don't remember anything about pre-reqs needing to "for science majors."

    I may be out of the loop (it was 2 years ago), but this may also be SDN hearsay. I'm not saying anyone's wrong, but OP, it may merit some phone calls to see what most schools require. As always, get the info from the source.
     
  9. gman33

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    I couldn't find the "science major" requirement on AMCAS.

    I did find this on an individual school's website.
    "Generally, the required courses will be eight credit hours and directed to the needs of premedical students. Courses designed for non-science majors, allied health students, et al., are not acceptable."

    Here's something from another school.
    "A strong preparation in the sciences basic to medical school studies is advised. A variety of college course formats and combinations, including biology, general and organic chemistry and physics are a minimum. Courses taken to meet the basic requirements should be, in general, comparable to courses accepted for concentration in these disciplines. Courses taken should be supplemented by laboratory experiences."

    Maybe some schools don't require this. Check with the individual schools before taking any classes that aren't for science majors.
     
  10. rogue0722

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    My university (Ga. State) has "intro" (non-science majors) and then "general" and "principles" (science-majors).

    For chemistry I think you want to go with "principles" as that is the foundational course for organic chemistry (most "principles" courses cover organic chemistry at the end for a chapter or two).
     
  11. gman33

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    My school was screwed up.
    General Bio was for non-majors.
    Intro to Bio was for majors.

    Not sure how they came up with that naming system. :thumbdown:
    Check the course description.
     
  12. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    Must vary by med school. Some may be more lax about this than others.
    Truer words never said.
     
  13. MLT2MT2DO

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    This must be the case. After reading this thread I was getting semi-panicky as 12 of my pre-req classes are not the "general" aimed at people majoring in that field of study. Luckily it seems no D.O. schools seem to mention this, nor did any of the 4 M.D. schools I'm planning on applying to.
     
  14. gman33

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    Did you ask the school and they said it was okay, or are you just assuming it is because they haven't mentioned it?
    Call the schools and ask.
     
  15. nontrdgsbuiucmd

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    Hi, small red flag went up when you wrote that you need to start taking classes at a "cc". It is important to some medical schools that the pre-med courses were completed at a 4-year college/university rather than a community college. I'm unclear if it is all or most schools that would consider this, but I know that it is a consideration, presumably due to the impression that community college courses may be easier than 4-yr schools. Forget where I'd read this, it did come up when I spoke with an admissions director who had not heard of my (post-bacc) school which is 30 years old & not really known outside my state, he specifically asked if it was a community college or a 4-year school.
     
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  17. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    These schools are in a minority. I applied to 37 medical schools and none required that prereqs not be done at a community college.

    That said, the smart thing to do is to take your prereqs at the best college you can. If you can take them at Princeton vs. U of Florida, take them at Princeton, but there's no problem taking them at U of Florida. If you can take them at Miami Dade Community College or U of Florida, take them at U of Florida, but there's no problem taking them at Miami Dade Community College. Take them at the best college you can. Whatever that is.

    I've only heard of two or three colleges that flat out don't accept community college prereqs, and two were schools that didn't accept OOS students.
     
  18. tpcooper

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    Thanks for all the previous replies.

    I am aware the community college thing is not ideal. There is a huge cost difference in my state though, about triple the cost for the university classes. I simply will never be able to pay that for all the hours I need. I plan to take at least one of my classes a semester at a university just to show I could do it. And then I'll have to hope my MCAT shows my ability also...I won't know about that for a long time though.

    From what I've seen, only a few schools say they will not accept community college credit, others say they discourage it. For me, its a some chance or no chance thing though...some if I do cc, none if I just don't do anything....
     

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