SLB-CO

2+ Year Member
Nov 10, 2015
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Hi Anna -

Good luck in your applications this year! I am not sure there is a way to look at what you want to see, but at most (all?) state schools when you are employed by the university/department (e.g., your teaching assistantship or research assistantship) you are automatically granted an in-state tuition rate that your department then pays for. For example, while I was not an international student, I was an out-of-state student, so my tuition rate would have been higher had I not had an assistantship. What you need to be careful of is that when you are no longer employed by the university/department, your tuition rate automatically changes back. In my case that meant I would have had to pay for credits at an out-of-state student rate while on internship if I hadn't gotten my residency status changed. I imagine you might be in a similar boat.

I hope that helps. In short, as long as you have a TA/RA that provides full tuition remission, during the time you hold that TA/RA, you should not be paying for tuition.
 

MCParent

Bronze Donor
7+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2012
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Psychologist
...at most (all?) state schools when you are employed by the university/department (e.g., your teaching assistantship or research assistantship) you are automatically granted an in-state tuition rate that your department then pays for...
That was my experience as well.
I did have to pay out-of state fees, which was something like $800 a semester instead of the in-state $500-ish fees. You should also check what happens when you go on internship; at some places, you will enroll in fewer credits during internship and when your CPT activates, and that can mess things up resulting in you having to pay more that year. Different schools do handle it all differently, so there is nothing wrong with asking. Regardless, you still get funding, somehow; you may get effectively less than domestic tudents, because you may have to pay more in fees, etc.
The department financial administrator is the person to email about this, after you contact the POI.
 
OP
U
Aug 28, 2016
11
0
Thank you for the quick response! That's mostly good news and definitely good info for later, should things work out :)
 

Ollie123

10+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2007
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Details are going to vary across states and schools, so there isn't going to be a universal answer to this question. Generally speaking, funded programs will have you paying (relatively) negligible costs regardless of where you are coming from. There are certainly exceptions on both the school end and the "circumstance" end. I agree that contacting individual schools is the best way to go.

Fair warning that this will likely require a bit of legwork to solve. At my grad institution, the employees in the financial aid office were not the most....competent....of individuals. Nothing they say is necessarily accurate. Many departments will have some sort of business office or support person who may be the most useful point of contact, but they are not necessarily easy to track down.