Aceofspades

10+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2007
443
10
251
Status
Dental Student
This is why people say don't apply to a school you wouldn't go to!
 

og2

Oct 1, 2009
119
1
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I could use your advice. Columbia is the only dental school I got in to. I'm from California and wanted to go to UCLA or UCSF for the cheap tuition. But, I also want to get my life started. Liviing in New York will be expensive. Columbia is also expensive. Which would you place as a priority?
go to columbia. it's better than one year lost especially when there's no guarantee where you'll get in next year.. you must've applied to Columbia thinking that you'd be happy going there if you got in, right? good luck with your decision.
 

wifi08

10+ Year Member
May 14, 2008
86
3
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
good points were made above, but i will talk dollars and cents. ready? waiting one year will cost you a years salary. we are talking at least 100K. so, will you save that much by attending ucla? plus you dont know if you will even get in, but columbia might just afford you a gpr in LA anyway.
in conclusion, do the math, and look at the other end of the tunnel before making your decision. whatever you do, be confident with your decision. This makes for successful life and dentistry.
 
Jul 30, 2009
52
1
41
Status
hey thanks a lot! what did you mean by afford me a gpr in la though? that i could match into one easily? or are you referring to something financial?
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2006
7,173
235
281
Status
Non-Student
Don't bother waiting, it's not worth it. Especially with how the UC system is being affected by the budget cuts, by the time you finished dental school you might have paid more than it cost to attend Columbia.
 

The Anhedonia

Winner Winner Chicken Dinner
10+ Year Member
Feb 18, 2009
999
423
281
Boston
Status
Resident [Any Field]
hey thanks a lot! what did you mean by afford me a gpr in la though? that i could match into one easily? or are you referring to something financial?
no, he/she was referring to the fact that Columbia has high specialty/residency placement, so in all likelihood you could end up in LA doing whatever you want after 4 years at Columbia.

http://dental.columbia.edu/education/POSTDOC10YR.pdf
 

Dent44

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 17, 2008
113
0
141
Status
You are forgetting he could easily spend this year working and saving money. Over the next year he could earn money that he can use to pay off some of his dental school costs, which actually multiplies when you consider that it'll pay off loans before interest starts building up.

I waited an extra year before applying because I thought I'd have a better shot at the schools I really wanted if I applied earlier in the cycle rather than apply late last year and settle for a school I wasnt thrilled about. Overall, I'm really happy with my decision. Not only did I get into good programs but I had a year full of wonderful experiences before beginning four tough years of dental school and a lifetime of work.

You dont know what will happen when/if you reapply so think about it, but remember a year off now isn't a wasted year when used well.


good points were made above, but i will talk dollars and cents. ready? waiting one year will cost you a years salary. we are talking at least 100K. so, will you save that much by attending ucla? plus you dont know if you will even get in, but columbia might just afford you a gpr in LA anyway.
in conclusion, do the math, and look at the other end of the tunnel before making your decision. whatever you do, be confident with your decision. This makes for successful life and dentistry.
 

DrReo

"Thread Necromancer"
10+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2007
3,117
13
251
Status
Academic Administration
You are forgetting he could easily spend this year working and saving money. Over the next year he could earn money that he can use to pay off some of his dental school costs, which actually multiplies when you consider that it'll pay off loans before interest starts building up.

I waited an extra year before applying because I thought I'd have a better shot at the schools I really wanted if I applied earlier in the cycle rather than apply late last year and settle for a school I wasnt thrilled about. Overall, I'm really happy with my decision. Not only did I get into good programs but I had a year full of wonderful experiences before beginning four tough years of dental school and a lifetime of work.

You dont know what will happen when/if you reapply so think about it, but remember a year off now isn't a wasted year when used well.
The tuition rate has been increased seven percent each year at many institution. . . .
 

reapply2007

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2006
1,076
5
251
Status
Dental Student
Go where you got in. Columbia does not have a reputation for general dentists so you'll likely need a residency regardless of what you want to do after dental school at Columbia. Basic science curriculum is very solid.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2006
7,173
235
281
Status
Non-Student
You are forgetting he could easily spend this year working and saving money. Over the next year he could earn money that he can use to pay off some of his dental school costs, which actually multiplies when you consider that it'll pay off loans before interest starts building up.
Spending a year making money as a college graduate means sacrificing a year you could be making money as a dentist (and taking another year of tuition hikes). Taking a year of could well cost you a great deal of money.
 

jay47

Think Positively!
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2007
1,068
7
0
Status
Dentist
Spending a year making money as a college graduate means sacrificing a year you could be making money as a dentist (and taking another year of tuition hikes). Taking a year of could well cost you a great deal of money.
Agreed, BUT, you have to look at potential savings. I think it would be hard to beat going now though, with 7% increases yearly. Really, the entire situation depends now on what you currently earn. If you make very little, go to school and gain that year of potential earning. If you make a good bit, it may save you money in interest and increase investment potential when you get out of school by saving money in the long run.
 
Jan 6, 2010
30
0
41
Status
Dental Student
Is Columbia's high rate of specialization/residency perhaps a function of being located in New York State? If a dentist wishes to practice there, they are required to do a one year residency program instead of taking the boards like other states. This could skew the numbers a little bit.
 

reapply2007

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2006
1,076
5
251
Status
Dental Student
I've spoken with a handful of Columbia dental students and alum. Small sample size but consistently stated that Columbia does/did not get them to feel clinically proficient and does not have a strong clinical program. To get work most graduates apparently have no choice but to either specialize or do a one year residency. But, as indicated, NY requires a one year residency for general dentistry. However, don't apply if you won't go if accepted. You applied, you received an acceptance, you should attend Columbia. It is a widely respected school.
 

Daurang

10+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2006
1,358
225
281
Status
Dentist
Go to Columbia now. If you didn't get into UOP or USC this year what makes you think you will get into UCLA or UCSF next year? Pretty much every dental students from California prefer to go to UCSF or UCLA, too, but that's not being realistic or mature.
 
May 12, 2009
123
0
0
NJ
Status
Dental Student
dont worry about columbia's supposed lack of clinical training.
Even if thats true which is debatable, your going to do more dentistry in the first 6/12 months after graduation than you did in all of dental school so its quickly going to be a mute point.

Plus your likely going to want a residency anyway since they are great opportunities to learn some additional skills that will allow you to keep more jobs to yourself and only refer out the especially difficult ones.