GBFKicks

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2004
343
1
Chicago, IL
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
What are some good combined MD/MPH programs. Is it a smooth transition between med school classes and public health classes? I'd be interested to know the experience of someone who is/was in one of these programs.

Thanks
 

CalBeE

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2003
2,062
1
Visit site
Status
GBFKicks said:
What are some good combined MD/MPH programs. Is it a smooth transition between med school classes and public health classes? I'd be interested to know the experience of someone who is/was in one of these programs.

Thanks
The ones I know of are:

Northwestern--Doesn't actually have a school of public health, so there won't be as much variety of classes as other schools
UCLA--Apply during your 2nd year in med school
UCSF/UCB or Stanford/UCB--Berkeley's school of public health is great, however, the joint program with Stanford is fairly new, and the two schools are separated geographically
Emory--So far one of the best programs I've seen. Have International Health concentration
Columbia--Many NYC schools allow you to do MD/MPH at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health...again, one of the best programs around
Yale, Hopkins, Harvard--No idea how these programs are like
 

greenwave34

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 28, 2003
58
0
Visit site
Status
Medical Student
Tulane is another good one and a four year program as well. They have many different tracks that students can choose and the school or PH and the Med School are very supportive and cooperative.
 
About the Ads

Cuteasaurus

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2004
268
0
Midwest
Visit site
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I'm going to have to disagree with the "Emory as the one of the best statements." They have a relatively new MD/MPH program (it's been going for about 10 years I think) and they don't know what kind of success they've had since they don't really have many alums. As far as the regular MPH program goes...considering they're right next to the CDC they should be lots better. I've talked to lots of grads from Emory who now work for the CDC and they describe it as a "middle of the road" education. I mean it's not bad, but considering that they're only 30 or so accred. public health schools, I would find it hard to say they're "one of the best."
 

DrJ2B

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2003
760
0
38
NY
Status
Cuteasaurus said:
I'm going to have to disagree with the "Emory as the one of the best statements." They have a relatively new MD/MPH program (it's been going for about 10 years I think) and they don't know what kind of success they've had since they don't really have many alums. As far as the regular MPH program goes...considering they're right next to the CDC they should be lots better. I've talked to lots of grads from Emory who now work for the CDC and they describe it as a "middle of the road" education. I mean it's not bad, but considering that they're only 30 or so accred. public health schools, I would find it hard to say they're "one of the best."
Yale and Hopkins (especially the latter) have awesome MPH programs in International/Global health. You cannot get much better than Hopkins though.
 

mosoriire

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 10, 1999
121
1
Baltimore, MD, US
Visit site
Status
Problem with Hopkins is that the MPH isnt structured into your four years, and FA to cover those years has to be considered...unlike in Tulane, the MPH will cost extra: about $40,000 extra in tuition and fees. Also, shoot me, but I have issues with the rigor of the MPH as opposed to the ScD or MHS degrees offered in the school.
 

CalBeE

7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2003
2,062
1
Visit site
Status
Hopkins' school of Public Health is undeniably the best in the nation (So is the Med school in my opinion).
Emory's program is actually pretty good. It's really new (About 10 years), but the fact that many CDC staff are faculty members at the med school and public health school, and the amount of concentrations available to choose from, will certain make it more and more well known over the years.
 

CrazyCarl

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2003
37
0
Visit site
Status
Don't forget Duke-->UNC Public Health. The latter is one of the very best programs in the country, and Duke's curriculum makes it very easy to get that 1 year MPH within 4 years.

Plus, what a great excuse to get the hell out of Durham...
 

DrJ2B

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2003
760
0
38
NY
Status
mosoriire said:
Problem with Hopkins is that the MPH isnt structured into your four years, and FA to cover those years has to be considered...unlike in Tulane, the MPH will cost extra: about $40,000 extra in tuition and fees. Also, shoot me, but I have issues with the rigor of the MPH as opposed to the ScD or MHS degrees offered in the school.
Actually, at my interview, I was told that they often find funding so students can either get a full ride to the MPH program or at least a half-ride. This past year, everyone got some sort of scholarship. I think that is a great deal! :)
 

snuggles

Junior Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2003
8
0
Visit site
Status
What is the difference between these top accredited programs, and programs at other medical schools that aren't accredited. Does it affect what you learn or your job possibilities?
 

Cuteasaurus

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 9, 2004
268
0
Midwest
Visit site
Status
Resident [Any Field]
It depends. If you want to work for the CDC, then I would say you def need to go to an accred. school. However, if you want to use the MD/MPH for private practice then it's less important.
 

missbonnie

floating
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 21, 2002
778
1
Status
Medical Student
At Columbia, a lot of folks get full tuition scholarships for the MPH part. Sweet.
 

mosoriire

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 10, 1999
121
1
Baltimore, MD, US
Visit site
Status
Actually, at my interview, I was told that they often find funding so students can either get a full ride to the MPH program or at least a half-ride. This past year, everyone got some sort of scholarship. I think that is a great deal
That's very weird, because I swear, most of the med students that were in last year's class are paying out of their pockets...As in Loans are covering...definitely some mixed signals there
 
May 31, 2003
928
7
42
FL
www.facebook.com
Status
Attending Physician
another thing to keep in mind is that if you are interested in an MPH for preventive medicine/general public health, you will most likely be able to do an MPH during your residency (while earning a salary)
 
May 31, 2003
928
7
42
FL
www.facebook.com
Status
Attending Physician
another thing to keep in mind is that if you are interested in an MPH for preventive medicine/general public health, you will most likely be able to do an MPH during your residency (while earning a salary)
 

Buckeye(OH)

5K+ Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2004
6,168
174
Toledo, Ohio
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Ohio State has one if anyone cares :)
 

Zweihander

Billygoat Gruff
Gold Donor
15+ Year Member
Jun 8, 2003
20,025
22,833
maximum effort
NYMC has a public health school and a dual program. The NYMC School of Public Health is also one of the few "certified" schools in the country, whatever that means. The program here is kinda weird, it's totally uncoordinated with the med school. You are essentially going to two totally separate schools simultaneously.

The plus sides of this:
You get to finish simultaneously with your MD, and don't have to spend extra years working on the MPH.
The public health education you get isn't watered down -- you're doing a full 45 credit masters with thesis.
It's cheap -- as a med student, you can attend the public health school for a grand total of 7k.
It's geared toward professionals and working people, so having a full-time life as a med student and going to another school entirely is more doable than it otherwise would be.

The minus:
It's a lot of work and it could affect your grades, though it likely won't make the difference between you passing and failing a class.
 
About the Ads