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It seems like there is a huge increase in DO admission competitiveness in recent years... When I decided to pursue a career in medicine 4 years ago, I specifically called one school that was just open and they told me 23-24 MCAT with 3.3 GPA would be competitive. For instance, 4-5 years ago, some DO schools have average MCAT in the 22-24 range. According to ACOM students, their first class had an average of 3.4 cGPA and 26 MCAT. Now even a new school like LUCOM says that they anticipate an average of 3.4 c/sGPA and 25+ MCAT for their incoming class. Why admission to DO school has become so competitive lately? Has the applicant pool become smarter due to other factors such as a bad economy, better MCAT test prep companies etc...?
 
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The entire medical school admissions process is extremely saturated with applicants and more people are becoming aware of the DO degree as well. Pre-medical students have to be more competitive with one another to increase their chances of getting a spot which leads to higher accepted class averages.
 

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Medicine is one of the few fields where you can still make a very good living, in a great career with lots of stability. One by one other professions are becoming saturated by kids hoping to achieve the same type of stable comfortable life their parents had. Contrary to what the old folk say, Millenials are very hard working and the process we face to become successful is a lot harder than what they faced. Law has failed, pharmacy is failing, and a lot of these academically talented kids are turning to medicine increasing the competition.
 

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Law has failed, pharmacy is failing, and a lot of these academically talented kids are turning to medicine increasing the competition.
I understand Law as a profession has been hit hard by oversaturation, but Pharmacy is failing? what's going on? Is it the same thing? Very curious about this.
 

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Lucom can anticipate what they want. Now the others yah, DO applications have gone up tremendously in competitiveness the last few years.

Apps are no longer a game of have a 3.0/23 and you're in. Now adays if you don't have a 3.5/28 chances are you'll be making a huge gamble.
 
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scoKraz4

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In my opinion, these schools should be very hesitant in accepting people scoring less than the average MCAT of EVERYONE taking the test. In 2012 it was around a 25-26. Of course there are exceptions, but in general.
 
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baboxxyun

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I understand Law as a profession has been hit hard by oversaturation, but Pharmacy is failing? what's going on? Is it the same thing? Very curious about this.
Yes, it's basically the same thing in pharmacy. There has been a steady decrease in the number of applicants for pharmacy at many schools because of this, while other health care professional schools have experienced increases (ie. nursing, physician assistant, dental).
 

baboxxyun

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In my opinion, these schools should be very hesitant in accepting people scoring less than the average MCAT of EVERYONE taking the test. In 2012 it was around a 25-26. Of course there are exceptions, but in general.
If the current trend continues, many more schools will have 28+ average MCAT scores for the matriculating class. There were two DO schools that i know of (I think it was touroNY and CCOM?) that have broken 30 MCAT.
 

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If the current trend continues, many more schools will have 28+ average MCAT scores for the matriculating class. There were two DO schools that i know of (I think it was touroNY and CCOM?) that have broken 30 MCAT.
My state MD hasn't even broken 30 yet.
 

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In my opinion, these schools should be very hesitant in accepting people scoring less than the average MCAT of EVERYONE taking the test. In 2012 it was around a 25-26. Of course there are exceptions, but in general.

The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
 

scoKraz4

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If the current trend continues, many more schools will have 28+ average MCAT scores for the matriculating class. There were two DO schools that i know of (I think it was touroNY and CCOM?) that have broken 30 MCAT.
Yeah Touro was slightly over a 30. Probably be higher this cycle too. Them and PCOM received the most primary apps last cycle I think?
Here is the thing though, When applicants are having MCATS pushing into the 30's and solid GPA and other credentials, they are definitely competitive for MD schools. But Touro offers students the opportunity to live in NYC which can be pretty attractive. The school knows this for sure too. I mean, all the really need is a contract with a hospital in the city for rotations, which they can probably score some smalls ones once contracts expire between the hospitals and other MD schools in the area. They definitely won't have a dominating presence, but some presence is good. Their main target is Harlem Hospital which is pretty close, but that is Columbia's turf.
 

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The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
You could argue all of it is a joke given the right circumstances. I think GPA's are a joke considering someone with a 4.0 with a communications major will be regarded higher than someone with a 3.3 electrical engineering major. Standardized tests are the best thing to go by though. So if you score that 30, schools will see that that 24 was just a bad day for you or you were unprepared.
 

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The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
I'm pretty sure that in the end the thing they're looking for here IS the capacity to study and preserver through studying a few months in quantities that lead to a score at or above a 30.

I mean they could have invented a non-content based exam that tries to examine purely critical thinking skills or even one that had validity through close correlation to IQ tests. But they did not, and in the end their choice to not use a GRE formatted test likely is for more reason than simply history I think.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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You could argue all of it is a joke given the right circumstances. I think GPA's are a joke considering someone with a 4.0 with a communications major will be regarded higher than someone with a 3.3 electrical engineering major. Standardized tests are the best thing to go by though. So if you score that 30, schools will see that that 24 was just a bad day for you or you were unprepared.
There's a lot of issues in GPA. But there are also a lot of issues with just about every stage of this process.
 
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The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
I don't think most reasonable people would argue that the MCAT is evaluating your fitness as a future physician.

Also, that you can work harder and potentially score higher isn't a knock on the test. Plenty of people never increase their score much. If a 6 point score increase were that easy I don't think the MCAT averages would be what they are.
 
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Elevencents

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I don't think most reasonable people would argue that the MCAT is evaluating your fitness as a future physician.

Also, that you can work harder and potentially score higher isn't a knock on the test. Plenty of people never increase their score much. If a 6 point score increase were that easy I don't think the MCAT averages would be what they are.
This. Everyone would be retaking if it was that easy. There are just as many people who score the same or sometimes even lower.
 

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-allopathic has become more competitive
-fewer people interested in Caribbean
-more people interested in medicine due to economy
-more awareness of DO option

However, if new schools continue to open, this increase in competitiveness will be markedly slower and will mainly be limited to the older schools. Right now, 3.3/3.3/24 can still pretty easily land an acceptance if they apply early and broadly.
 

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If you look at AACOM data, the trends are hardly upward at all for the past few years. In 2010 the entering DO cohort had 3.36/3.57 and 26.9 mcat. In 2012 it was 3.37/3.59 and 26.85 mcat.

Compare that with MD programs for which the 2010 cohort had 3.61/3.75 and 31.1 mcat, and the 2012 cohort had 3.63/3.75 and 31.2 mcat.
 

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We have noticed the same thing. I suspect it's the economy. Our admissions app skyrocketed when the tech bubble burst in 2001.

Also, I think the prejudice against DO you see from ignorant pre-meds seems to be dissipating. I've even noticed that in the pre-allo forum. Therefore quality applicants who would have kept on on banging their heads again the GPA/MCAT barriers to MD schools now go after DO programs. If you consider that in, say Indiana, about 300 people get into the IU system. That leaves another ~100-150 for MUCOM to scoop up. Are there enough people of IU caliber (or near caliber) in IN and nearby states? Yes! Thus MUCOM is very competitive, and one can expand that nation-wide, it seems.


Merry Xmas, y'all.



It seems like there is a huge increase in DO admission competiveness in recent years... When I decided to pursue a career in medicine 4 years ago, I specifically called one school that was just open and they told me 23-24 MCAT with 3.3 GPA would be competitive. For instance, 4-5 years ago, some DO schools have average MCAT in the 22-24 range. According to ACOM students, their first class had an average of 3.4 cGPA and 26 MCAT. Now even a new school like LUCOM says that they anticipate an average of 3.4 c/sGPA and 25+ MCAT for their incoming class. Why admission to DO school has become so competitive lately? Is the applicant pool become smarter due to other factors such as a bad economy, better MCAT test prep companies etc...?
 
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In order for medicine to become 'oversaturated' wouldn't the # of new schools opening not matter as they are dependent on the # of residencies available? And with no resies opening at the moment (or at least very few), saturation is prevented. correct?
 

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I cant wait until the food gets done! Sorry off topic im avoiding my deplorable family until the turkey comes out of the oven.
 

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In order for medicine to become 'oversaturated' wouldn't the # of new schools opening not matter as they are dependent on the # of residencies available? And with no resies opening at the moment (or at least very few), saturation is prevented. correct?
You are correct. Medical schools, however, can become oversaturated, if we end up with more graduates than we can place in residencies. This is a very real possibility if schools keep opening at their current pace.
 
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It was not too long ago there was a school (KYCOM) that had an average of 21 MCAT... were people coming out of this school bad physicians?
 
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-allopathic has become more competitive
-fewer people interested in Caribbean
-more people interested in medicine due to economy
-more awareness of DO option

3.3/3.3/24 can still land an acceptance if they apply early and broadly.
Fixed
 
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If you look at AACOM data, the trends are hardly upward at all for the past few years. In 2010 the entering DO cohort had 3.36/3.57 and 26.9 mcat. In 2012 it was 3.37/3.59 and 26.85 mcat.
Could be due to the new schools opening recently with low averages? If you take the avg MCAT for the more established schools from a decade ago vs. today, there is definitely an increase.

Here is the thing though, When applicants are having MCATS pushing into the 30's and solid GPA and other credentials, they are definitely competitive for MD schools. But Touro offers students the opportunity to live in NYC which can be pretty attractive. The school knows this for sure too. I mean, all the really need is a contract with a hospital in the city for rotations, which they can probably score some smalls ones once contracts expire between the hospitals and other MD schools in the area. They definitely won't have a dominating presence, but some presence is good. Their main target is Harlem Hospital which is pretty close, but that is Columbia's turf.
I think this is the case with the 2 California schools as well. If you can't make it into the very competitive CA MD schools and want to stay in CA, your options are Touro CA or Western. Even then, their stats are higher than MD schools in other random states.
 

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Could be due to the new schools opening recently with low averages? If you take the avg MCAT for the more established schools from a decade ago vs. today, there is definitely an increase.

I think this is the case with the 2 California schools as well. If you can't make it into the very competitive CA MD schools and want to stay in CA, your options are Touro CA or Western. Even then, their stats are higher than MD schools in other random states.
I wouldn't be surprised if the Pomona campus avg was 30 or above. I got the chance to meet some very high caliber applicants during my interview there.

Here is a list of avg MCAT scores from DO schools in 2008. Notice how far ahead WesternU was back then.

I think this is the reference User3 uses for his recommendations (http://www.atsu.edu/faculty/chamberlain/ranmcat.htm). :laugh:

Allopathic schools have also gotten more competitive in the past 5-8 years. When I was in undergrad I remember my state school offered an interview to anyone who had a 23 or higher. They took that privilege away a few years ago.

2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education
 
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The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
I took the MCAT once and I can tell you the only reason I scored good is not because I'm smarter than the person who scored a 25, but because I got lucky to be hit with the right questions on the right stuff.

If it was the other way around, I would've scored a 24. Outside of the exam, my fitness is about the same it was then as it is now.
 
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I wouldn't be surprised if the Pomona campus avg was 30 or above. I got the chance to meet some very high caliber applicants during my interview there.

Here is a list of avg MCAT scores from DO schools in 2008. Notice how far ahead WesternU was back then.

I think this is the reference User3 uses for his recommendations (http://www.atsu.edu/faculty/chamberlain/ranmcat.htm). :laugh:

Allopathic schools have also gotten more competitive in the past 5-8 years. When I was in undergrad I remember my state school offered an interview to anyone who had a 23 or higher. They took that privilege away a few years ago.

2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education
This is getting crazy! 5 year ago, 23 MCAT score would have been competitive. Now people with a 24 MCAT have just a slim-to-no chances at all... Now even Pikeville ,WVSOM, LMU and ACOM have a 25+ average MCAT score... I guess in another 3 years 26-27 MCAT would not be considered a competitive score. That means that 5 years ago people with 19-20 MCAT score had a good shot in getting in somewhere. A physician from LECOM told me that and I did not believe him. I guess he was right. Not to mention that the MCAT is even getting harder looking at the previous AAMC tests.
 
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I wouldn't be surprised if the Pomona campus avg was 30 or above. I got the chance to meet some very high caliber applicants during my interview there.

Here is a list of avg MCAT scores from DO schools in 2008. Notice how far ahead WesternU was back then.

I think this is the reference User3 uses for his recommendations (http://www.atsu.edu/faculty/chamberlain/ranmcat.htm). :laugh:

Allopathic schools have also gotten more competitive in the past 5-8 years. When I was in undergrad I remember my state school offered an interview to anyone who had a 23 or higher. They took that privilege away a few years ago.

2006 Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education
here is the most up to date list I have compiled:

Touro-NY: ?/30.8
Touro-Ca: 3.47/3.40/30.1
CCOM: 3.60/3.55/29.4
RVU: 3.60/3.57/28.33
DMU: 3.68/3.68/28.2
RowanSOM: 3.63/3.55/28
NYITCOM: 3.6/28
UNTHSC-TCOM: 3.59/3.51/28
COMP: 3.56/3.51/28
COMP-NW: 3.55/3.49/28
AZCOM: 3.51/3.44/28
LECOM-B: 3.50/3.40/28
UNECOM: 3.5+/28
NSU: 3.49/3.40/28
PCOM: 3.46/3.37/28 (2016)
TUNCOM: ?/28
MSUCOM: 3.57/27.57
OU-HCOM: 3.65/3.61/27.42
KCOM: 3.56/3.47/27
LECOM-E/SH: 3.48/3.35/27
ATSU-SOMA: 3.42/3.32/27 (2016)
PCOM-Ga: ?/27 (2015)
MUCOM: 3.57/3.49/26.28
OSU-COM: 3.61/3.54/26
KCUMB: 3.60/3.53/26
CUSOM: 3.55/3.23/26
WCU: 3.5/3.4/26
ACOM: 3.4/26
LMU: ?/26
PNWU: 3.40/3.31/25.76
VCOM-CC: 3.61/3.55/25 (2015)
VCOM-VC: 3.59/3.52/25 (2015)
WVSOM: 3.4/3.4/25
KYCOM: 3.5/3.4/24
 
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here is the most up to date list I have compiled:

Touro-NY: ?/30.8
Touro-Ca: 3.47/3.40/30.1
CCOM: 3.60/3.55/29
RVU: 3.60/3.57/28.33
DMU: 3.68/3.68/28.2
RowanSOM: 3.63/3.55/28
MSUCOM: 3.6/3.6/28
NYITCOM: 3.6/28
UNTHSC-TCOM: 3.59/3.51/28
COMP: 3.56/3.51/28
COMP-NW: 3.55/3.49/28
AZCOM: 3.51/3.44/28
LECOM-B: 3.50/3.40/28
NSU: 3.49/3.40/28
PCOM: 3.46/3.37/28 (2016)
TUNCOM: ?/28
OU-HCOM: 3.65/3.61/27.42
KCOM: 3.56/3.47/27
UNECOM: 3.5+/28
LECOM-E/SH: 3.48/3.35/27
ATSU-SOMA: 3.42/3.32/27 (2016)
PCOM-Ga: ?/27 (2015)
MUCOM: 3.57/3.49/26.28
OSU-COM: 3.61/3.54/26
KCUMB: 3.60/3.53/26
CUSOM: 3.55/3.23/26
WCU: 3.5/3.4/26
ACOM: 3.4/26
LMU: ?/26
PNWU: 3.40/3.31/25.76
VCOM-CC: 3.61/3.55/25 (2015)
VCOM-VC: 3.59/3.52/25 (2015)
WVSOM: 3.4/3.4/25
KYCOM: 3.5/3.4/24
4 years ago I called LMU and they told me that I would be fine with a 23-24 MCAT. I guess this is not the case anymore.
 

Elevencents

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here is the most up to date list I have compiled:

Touro-NY: ?/30.8
Touro-Ca: 3.47/3.40/30.1
CCOM: 3.60/3.55/29
RVU: 3.60/3.57/28.33
DMU: 3.68/3.68/28.2
RowanSOM: 3.63/3.55/28
MSUCOM: 3.6/3.6/28
NYITCOM: 3.6/28
UNTHSC-TCOM: 3.59/3.51/28
COMP: 3.56/3.51/28
COMP-NW: 3.55/3.49/28
AZCOM: 3.51/3.44/28
LECOM-B: 3.50/3.40/28
UNECOM: 3.5+/28
NSU: 3.49/3.40/28
PCOM: 3.46/3.37/28 (2016)
TUNCOM: ?/28
OU-HCOM: 3.65/3.61/27.42
KCOM: 3.56/3.47/27
LECOM-E/SH: 3.48/3.35/27
ATSU-SOMA: 3.42/3.32/27 (2016)
PCOM-Ga: ?/27 (2015)
MUCOM: 3.57/3.49/26.28
OSU-COM: 3.61/3.54/26
KCUMB: 3.60/3.53/26
CUSOM: 3.55/3.23/26
WCU: 3.5/3.4/26
ACOM: 3.4/26
LMU: ?/26
PNWU: 3.40/3.31/25.76
VCOM-CC: 3.61/3.55/25 (2015)
VCOM-VC: 3.59/3.52/25 (2015)
WVSOM: 3.4/3.4/25
KYCOM: 3.5/3.4/24
This needs to be stickied for all the where should I apply threads!
 
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here is the most up to date list I have compiled:

Touro-NY: ?/30.8
Touro-Ca: 3.47/3.40/30.1
CCOM: 3.60/3.55/29
RVU: 3.60/3.57/28.33
DMU: 3.68/3.68/28.2
RowanSOM: 3.63/3.55/28
MSUCOM: 3.6/3.6/28
NYITCOM: 3.6/28
UNTHSC-TCOM: 3.59/3.51/28
COMP: 3.56/3.51/28
COMP-NW: 3.55/3.49/28
AZCOM: 3.51/3.44/28
LECOM-B: 3.50/3.40/28
UNECOM: 3.5+/28
NSU: 3.49/3.40/28
PCOM: 3.46/3.37/28 (2016)
TUNCOM: ?/28
OU-HCOM: 3.65/3.61/27.42
KCOM: 3.56/3.47/27
LECOM-E/SH: 3.48/3.35/27
ATSU-SOMA: 3.42/3.32/27 (2016)
PCOM-Ga: ?/27 (2015)
MUCOM: 3.57/3.49/26.28
OSU-COM: 3.61/3.54/26
KCUMB: 3.60/3.53/26
CUSOM: 3.55/3.23/26
WCU: 3.5/3.4/26
ACOM: 3.4/26
LMU: ?/26
PNWU: 3.40/3.31/25.76
VCOM-CC: 3.61/3.55/25 (2015)
VCOM-VC: 3.59/3.52/25 (2015)
WVSOM: 3.4/3.4/25
KYCOM: 3.5/3.4/24
Touro NY's average mcat is 27, not 30.8
 
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In my opinion, these schools should be very hesitant in accepting people scoring less than the average MCAT of EVERYONE taking the test. In 2012 it was around a 25-26. Of course there are exceptions, but in general.
4-5 years ago the average MCAT for schools like KYCOM (21+), WVSOM (21+), LECOM(23), SOMA-AZ (23), LMU (23) and VCOM (24) etc... Therefore, a lot of people have gotten in with 20-23 MCAT score. Also, from looking at the previous AAMC tests, one might say that the MCAT was a bit easier... Were/Are most people coming out of these schools going to be bad physicians?
 

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I wish this information would be more accessible via some type of osteopathic medical school publication similar to the msar.

kind of lame that some schools don't report up to date stats
 
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4-5 years ago the average MCAT for schools like KYCOM (21+), WVSOM (21+), LECOM(23), SOMA-AZ (23), LMU (23) and VCOM (24) etc... Therefore, a lot of people have gotten in with 20-23 MCAT score. Also, from looking at the previous AAMC tests, one might say that the MCAT was a bit easier... Were/Are most people coming out of these schools going to be bad physicians?
Ask the current attendings if they are bad physicians ;)
 
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Ask the current attendings if they are bad physicians ;)
:)...That was my point. I work with some and shadowed one, and I think she is an excellent IM physician. she told me she got in with an 18 mcat. Go figure!
 

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If you look at AACOM data, the trends are hardly upward at all for the past few years. In 2010 the entering DO cohort had 3.36/3.57 and 26.9 mcat. In 2012 it was 3.37/3.59 and 26.85 mcat.

Compare that with MD programs for which the 2010 cohort had 3.61/3.75 and 31.1 mcat, and the 2012 cohort had 3.63/3.75 and 31.2 mcat.
Even if this is true, it doesn't factor the fact that for the past 3 years we've been seeing at least 1 school opening up each year w/130+ seats. You can only maintain the balance by there being more competitive applicants or by having the older schools becoming more competitive.
 

Haxx

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Even if this is true, it doesn't factor the fact that for the past 3 years we've been seeing at least 1 school opening up each year w/130+ seats. You can only maintain the balance by there being more competitive applicants or by having the older schools becoming more competitive.
Per user3's list, RVUCOM's stats are: -RVU: 3.60/3.57/28.33-
RVU is one of those new schools, so I'd definitely say that more competitive applicants as a whole, not only at certain schools, is the shift we're seeing.
 
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I think, as others here have speculated, that the competitiveness at DO schools is rising because knowledge of the DO profession, especially among premedical students, is hitting a critical saturation. As I've alluded to on other threads on the subject, at my school there is a relatively large segment of matriculating students who really don't see it as an "alternative" way into medicine. They get irritated when this is implicated by other students. Commenters on SDN often fail to realize that many applicants to medical school have never been on SDN, let alone post or routinely read the content. SDN, for all its virtues, can be a little neurotic. So, I'll elaborate a bit:

1) Many students at my school seem to come from smaller private and public liberal arts colleges throughout what I call "middle America." Think rural Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah, Kentucky, etc. Their school's premedical admissions offices promote DO schools among allopathic institutions as a completely equitable option, sometimes with their own positives. My DO school seems to go to great lengths to market and recruit in these places. There are highly competitive applicants at my school and, if I were to look at them through the lens of SDN standards, I would be perplexed, as if they got lost on their way to a "mid-tier" MD school. There are also the students from NY and California who, when faced with the increased odds of admission at their state MD schools, saw DO institutions as a totally reasonable pathway to becoming a physician.

2) DO is starting to get a reputation as the go-to pathway for primary care. Quite a few students in my class want to be family practice doctors out of the gate. It isn't lost on them that DO schools tend to push primary care as their mission and, for a small select few, that DO = OMT. Deep down, and I could be wrong, there is definitely an understanding that OMT= increased income in the right practice environment.

3) Financial. Some states have crazy expensive state medical schools. Some of the DO schools are cheaper, depending on in-state vs. OOS status.

There are a variety of other reasons that students choose the DO pathway, but they're more individual and harder to quantify into a single point. The bigger point is that DO schools, instead of being an alternative way to medicine for many students, are attracting students who truly see it as just another path to being a physician. I think many of the schools are doing this while simultaneously trying to balance the overall feel of their institutions, so it is still a good option for the non-traditional applicant. Above all else, DO schools are unique and they have their own unique set of things they're looking for in an applicant. I don't think anyone on here should be getting too worried about the admissions equation just yet.
 

Moose A Moose

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This is getting crazy! 5 year ago, 23 MCAT score would have been competitive. Now people with a 24 MCAT have just a slim-to-no chances at all... Now even Pikeville ,WVSOM, LMU and ACOM have a 25+ average MCAT score... I guess in another 3 years 26-27 MCAT would not be considered a competitive score. That means that 5 years ago people with 19-20 MCAT score had a good shot in getting in somewhere. A physician from LECOM told me that and I did not believe him. I guess he was right. Not to mention that the MCAT is even getting harder looking at the previous AAMC tests.
Correct. The the majority if the established DO schools are striving to beef up their admission numbers. Not only to come closer to their MD colleagues, but something like the MCAT score reported corresponds to Step 1 and 2 performance. The DO schools are tired of having so many of their students flop boards.
 
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There is a lot more knowledge about DO schools today than in the past. A lot of people in the past did not know that a DO was a way to become a doctor. Today DOs have equal practice rights. Also the medical profession is stable, the economy over the last several years has not been very good, so many students are interested in entering a profession that will keep them employed and earn them a good income.
 
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The MCAT, is a f'ing joke. You can take it score a 24, then study for a few more months and score a 30. The person who made both scores is the same person, and is no less fit to be a physician than he was a few months ago.
You don't take the MCAT to be fit to be a physician, you just have to do a bunch of bull**** and the attrition of all this bull**** wears on the applicant until only a seriously dedicated matriculating class remains. I can't even find the will to finish some of my "why do you really want to attend X" secondary essays. I'm at the breaking point.
 
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IslandStyle808

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You don't take the MCAT to be fit to be a physician, you just have to do a bunch of bullcrap and the attrition of all this bullcrap wears on the applicant until only a seriously dedicated matriculating class remains. I can't even find the will to finish some of my "why do you really want to attend X" secondary essays. I'm at the breaking point.
Ditto
 

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You don't take the MCAT to be fit to be a physician, you just have to do a bunch of bullcrap and the attrition of all this bullcrap wears on the applicant until only a seriously dedicated matriculating class remains. I can't even find the will to finish some of my "why do you really want to attend X" secondary essays. I'm at the breaking point.
I agree. I told one of my friends that the other day. The whole process is really just a war of attrition.