takeuwithme

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Hello. I am taking Introductory Chemistry, and I heard that I don't need it to get into medical school, but since I didn't take any in High School, I have to take it before I get into my more advanced Chemistry classes.

I am doing poorly. The book he assigned has many mistakes in it, and his teaching sucks. I will probably get a C in the class. Is this going to hurt any chances I have for medical school?

Also, there's only about 8 medical schools I can apply to within my state. I cannot go to any other college besides ones that are close to me however because I have two kids, and a spouse who is going to be there for them when I get in. However, going far out of state would seem awful for them. Should I still apply to the other schools, just to have applied, even though if I'm accepted, I won't go there?

Also I have my Bachelor's degree in Sociology/Human Services. I have experience doing medication transcription for 3 months, volunteering with foster care teenagers for 3 months, being a group home Case Manager for people with mental illness, where I had to do counseling, and take them to the hospital and refill and take care of their medication for them. I learned a lot about doctors and medications while there for 3 years. It was a lot like a hospital, because if a medication was missed, we had a protocol to follow. I am currently requesting information to volunteer at a hospital and to do shadowing. However, I don't plan on applying to medical school until 2009 or 2010. Will my experience help me, and should I still volunteer at a hospital, or will any volunteer experience help?

Any advice would be great!!

Takeuwithme
 

nu2004

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i feel your pain, but bad professors and poorly written txts are unfortunate facts of academic life. if you were working at McDonald's, you'd have a whole other host of problems :)

get accustomed to teaching yourself when the prof sucks. find outside texts (library, maybe?) and approach the material from different angles. assign yourself problem sets and make sure you do them.

if you find that you still struggle with intro chemistry, you have some nasty surprises ahead of you.
 
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takeuwithme

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I have done all of that. I have gotten help from a tutor on my past exams, so that I understand what I did wrong. I have went on the internet, and done all I could from the book. However, maybe I should try the library.

Thanks for trying.

Takeuwithme

i feel your pain, but bad professors and poorly written txts are unfortunate facts of academic life. if you were working at McDonald's, you'd have a whole other host of problems :)

get accustomed to teaching yourself when the prof sucks. find outside texts (library, maybe?) and approach the material from different angles. assign yourself problem sets and make sure you do them.

if you find that you still struggle with intro chemistry, you have some nasty surprises ahead of you.
 

nu2004

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I have done all of that. I have gotten help from a tutor on my past exams, so that I understand what I did wrong. I have went on the internet, and done all I could from the book. However, maybe I should try the library.

Thanks for trying.

Takeuwithme
i think if you can check out another textbook, it will be good - another set of problems and another chunk of prose to try to explain what's going on. you'll feel like you're doing it twice, but it's worth it if you really understand. good luck!
 

Luxian

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Sorry about the chem class. However, this is a good opportunity to get some excellent independent study habits. From what I hear, med school has few required texts. You just choose what works best for you (textbook, review or intermediary text) and most of the learning in the first two years happens on your own.

Also, there's only about 8 medical schools I can apply to within my state. I cannot go to any other college besides ones that are close to me however because I have two kids, and a spouse who is going to be there for them when I get in. However, going far out of state would seem awful for them. Should I still apply to the other schools, just to have applied, even though if I'm accepted, I won't go there?
Certainly do NOT apply to any that you don't intend to go to. Applying to med school is costly, and each app will be about $100 plus if you get an interview there's additional travel costs. However, eight schools is not very many. Is there any chance at all your family would be able to move if you applied and got into a school out of state? If not, make sure that you have an absolutely stellar application and apply early (July/Aug) to take advantage of the number of interview spots still available.

Good luck!
 

njbmd

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Hello. I am taking Introductory Chemistry, and I heard that I don't need it to get into medical school, but since I didn't take any in High School, I have to take it before I get into my more advanced Chemistry classes.

I am doing poorly. The book he assigned has many mistakes in it, and his teaching sucks. I will probably get a C in the class. Is this going to hurt any chances I have for medical school?

Also, there's only about 8 medical schools I can apply to within my state. I cannot go to any other college besides ones that are close to me however because I have two kids, and a spouse who is going to be there for them when I get in. However, going far out of state would seem awful for them. Should I still apply to the other schools, just to have applied, even though if I'm accepted, I won't go there?

Also I have my Bachelor's degree in Sociology/Human Services. I have experience doing medication transcription for 3 months, volunteering with foster care teenagers for 3 months, being a group home Case Manager for people with mental illness, where I had to do counseling, and take them to the hospital and refill and take care of their medication for them. I learned a lot about doctors and medications while there for 3 years. It was a lot like a hospital, because if a medication was missed, we had a protocol to follow. I am currently requesting information to volunteer at a hospital and to do shadowing. However, I don't plan on applying to medical school until 2009 or 2010. Will my experience help me, and should I still volunteer at a hospital, or will any volunteer experience help?

Any advice would be great!!

Takeuwithme
Right now, leave the experience-part of your application and the choosing of medical schools alone. Your immediate problem is to get that chemistry grade under control. If your book has mistakes, then utilize another book or make the corrections and move on. If the teacher is poor, then go to tutorial sessions or hire a tutor (some schools have free tutorial services) but find a way to get this material mastered.

Make sure that you math skills are adequate and sound. For any Chemistry, your algebra skills need to be excellent. If your math is up to par, you will be able to pick out mistakes yourself and not be swayed by them.

Find out what kinds of tutorials your college has to offer and make use of them. Do not go to a tutorial session unprepared. Work thorough your problems as much as possible and go with specific questions.

Another strategy might be to form or join a study group of your classmates. If you are struggling, it is likely that others may be having the same problems and would appreciate having someone to work thorough the material with. The collective brain is always better than the single brain alone. As with the tutors, do not go to a study group until you have reviewed and worked through most of the material on your own. Then you can discuss your problems and focus on them.

Be sure to prepare for each class. This means having read the assigned readings and worked in problems along with the book before the lecture on that material and not after. If you have a course syllabus, utilize it to get ahead and stay ahead.

Also, you likely need to do some work on this material daily. Set yourself a study schedule and stick with it. Check of things as you go along so that you know what you are doing. Don't wait for the professor to cover something, cover yourself before he/she gets there so that you can ask questions and reinforce your knowledge. In short, be proactive about this class.

Even the worst teacher can be overcome by an excellent student. Be that excellent student. In the long run, this can help you develop the skills that will serve you well in medical school.
 

nlax30

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How was your GPA during your previous undergrad years? If your GPA has always been good then a single C isn't going to kill you. Though, some schools have a cut off of not accepting the course credit if you get a C- or below. If it's still going to be a year or two before you apply you have a little time to bring up the GPA with other courses. Regardless, get through this chem class and do as best as you can. If needed, find another textbook that explains some thing better and learn the concept from that.

A lot will also depend on your MCAT, so when you get ready to think about that just make sure you prepare very well and do the best you can.

About which schools to apply to..... Definitely don't apply to any school you would not be willing to attend. What's the point in applying to a school that you know you wouldn't go to just to see if you get accepted? Just wasting time and money. I sympathize with the family issues, it is hard to move them around. Before you even start applying you and your husband HAVE to sit down and talk through all this. Is he working? Can he/is he willing to relocate? Sit down with a list of medical schools all over the country (MD and DO) and go through them deciding where you BOTH would be willing to move to. Are the kids currently in school? Do ya'll have family nearby helping with them? There's really no right/wrong answer here. You both have to decide whether or not you'd be willing to relocate the family. If the answer is absolutely not then just apply to the schools around you. If yes then apply to others as well.

Good luck!
 

nontrdgsbuiucmd

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Mar 28, 2008
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i feel your pain, but bad professors and poorly written txts are unfortunate facts of academic life. if you were working at McDonald's, you'd have a whole other host of problems :)

get accustomed to teaching yourself when the prof sucks. find outside texts (library, maybe?) and approach the material from different angles. assign yourself problem sets and make sure you do them.

if you find that you still struggle with intro chemistry, you have some nasty surprises ahead of you.
I've had the same experience, some teachers in my post bacc are great, others not so much. The difference between my almost D in physics 1 many years ago and my As in physics & other science courses now is time and practice.. I need to master the knowledge for the MCAT regardless, and when doing genchem 2 last year spent every saturday, full day, doing gen chem problems, in addition to reading genchem & doing problems several nights during the week, + completing every chapter problem, every odd problem at the end of my book, + homework problems (2x). Doing that in physics, genchem, + ochem earned As in those classes. (yes I have no life now)

May seem like overkill, it really taught me the material, though. Just took a huge amount of time (away from my 2 children & family also, unfortunately). That said, any med school applicant is competing against the many applicants POSITIVE they should be accepted, who are willing to put in whatever time is needed to succeed in every class.
 

nu2004

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I've had the same experience, some teachers in my post bacc are great, others not so much. The difference between my almost D in physics 1 many years ago and my As in physics & other science courses now is time and practice.. I need to master the knowledge for the MCAT regardless, and when doing genchem 2 last year spent every saturday, full day, doing gen chem problems, in addition to reading genchem & doing problems several nights during the week, + completing every chapter problem, every odd problem at the end of my book, + homework problems (2x). Doing that in physics, genchem, + ochem earned As in those classes. (yes I have no life now)

May seem like overkill, it really taught me the material, though. Just took a huge amount of time (away from my 2 children & family also, unfortunately). That said, any med school applicant is competing against the many applicants POSITIVE they should be accepted, who are willing to put in whatever time is needed to succeed in every class.
sounds like you're in good shape. when do you take the MCAT?
 

nontrdgsbuiucmd

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sounds like you're in good shape. when do you take the MCAT?
Thx, I hope so! I'm signed up July 10 I believe..sat for it last year w/only

Physics 1 & lab
Ochem 1&2 & lab
Gen Chem 2 & lab
Bio 1&2 & labs

(covered these classes 1/07 - 7/07 & sat for the 8/07 MCAT)

27S due to some areas I failed to study that were listed on the AAMC site, MCAT subject material section; clearly stated as being covered on the MCAT but were not covered in my coursework (i.e. physiology) Sitting for it again after completing Physics 2, A&P, Cell & Molecular, Gen Chem 1, I found the test tough! Definitely do not underestimate this puppy..
 

nu2004

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Thx, I hope so! I'm signed up July 10 I believe..sat for it last year w/only

Physics 1 & lab
Ochem 1&2 & lab
Gen Chem 2 & lab
Bio 1&2 & labs

(covered these classes 1/07 - 7/07 & sat for the 8/07 MCAT)

27S due to some areas I failed to study that were listed on the AAMC site, MCAT subject material section; clearly stated as being covered on the MCAT but were not covered in my coursework (i.e. physiology) Sitting for it again after completing Physics 2, A&P, Cell & Molecular, Gen Chem 1, I found the test tough! Definitely do not underestimate this puppy..
i thought physio was useful. random stuff like knowing where RBCs go to die (the spleen) helped on practice tests and may have helped on the real thing. honestly it was almost a year ago and i can't remember. :D

good luck!