Considering podiatry should I do it?

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by poopsmcgeethe3rd, 05.12.14.

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  1. poopsmcgeethe3rd

    poopsmcgeethe3rd

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    I was considering another medical before podiatry, but my gpa is not up to par I have a 3.03 cgpa and a 2.79 science gpa at a good college majoring in a hard science. I slacked off in school and just got by, one of my family member suggested podiatry and starting to consider it. I have a relative who is going into podiatry so it would be nice if we could just go together and help each other out. I was considering another medical profession but I would most likely have to take a masters program to boost up my gpa and I find it highly risky and alot more money. would my stats be good enough to get into podiatry? I know that podiatry is really hard to get through one thing that deters me tho is the 3 years of residency. after working for a bit I realized that I do want to own my own business. What is your thoughts on the future of podiatry?
     
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  3. Toadesque

    Toadesque 7+ Year Member

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    Do some research on it, shadow, come to a decision. Simple as that
     
  4. T13ones

    T13ones 2+ Year Member

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    I am in no way saying this is what you meant by your question, however Podiatric Medical school is not a "cop out" or the easy way through to a medical career. The stats for admittance into Podiatry schools are mostly lower due to the public's lack of knowledge. There is not a lot of publication out there on the option for students to enter Podiatric Medical schools. Therefore the pool is smaller, and the stats seem to be lower. As the demand for this profession increases with the booming population, diabetic matters, obesity and the need for the aging population to want to continue to stay active longer this will, in my opinion, cause the pool to get larger, I believe the stats will increase to higher GPA's and Higher MCAT averages. I know you did state that Podiatry is hard to get through, so I don't mean to assume that you think this, I just want you to make sure that you know what you are getting yourself into either way. It is medical school, from the commitment, the time, and energy, it will all be the same. With all this aside though, I believe Toadesque summed it up best, make sure you do your overall research and shadowing on a podiatrist and make sure it is something that truly interest you and that you are passionate about, because not only is that the only way in which podiatry can grow to the fullest but also this is a commitment to what you are going to be doing the rest of your life. Good luck with everything and I definitely wish you the best in whichever road you take!:thumbup:
     
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  5. SLCpod

    SLCpod Staff Member SDN Moderator 5+ Year Member

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    The habits you have in udergrad carry to your next program. I don't know you, but from this paragraph I would tell you to stay away from podiatry. I don't think you'll make it. Hopefully that statement does one of two things. It either makes you realize that medicine isn't a good fit OR makes you realize that you have a lot of work to do and should go to a masters program/take another a few classes to change your bad habits. You don't want to end up with debt to your ears and nothing to show for it.
     
  6. LittleMopeHead

    LittleMopeHead 2+ Year Member

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    Podiatry is changing and I believe it is getting more competitive to get in and the demand in the curriculum is more difficult than it used to be. Mainly because the profession has a mission (Vision 2015) and there's more requirements out of a podiatry student (i.e. starting 2015, they will require every student to take the extra exam in clinical skills/physical diagnosis before graduation). You can see there's three hurdles already - Boards part 1 (after second year), Boards part 2 + a separate oral clinical exam (4th year). Then, there's three years of residency (that you have to match!). The requirements for admission is still low and I believe it will slowly go up in the near future. Many would think this is the backdoor into medicine. It is not. Podiatry, as in any other medical field, requires a whole lot of time and commitment, mainly time management. It can be easy to get in, but it can be extremely hard to get through for some. As some people say it, easy to get in but staying can be extremely hard. You cannot slack off in podiatry school and you must change the way you study too. It is a whole different ballgame than undergrad.

    Your GPA may not cut it for podiatry admission, especially your science GPA. I'm not saying it's impossible, but a lot of the schools will not go that low. Make sure to do the research into the profession as others have stated before making the final decision. Once it starts, there's no going back. Good luck.
     
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  7. Toadesque

    Toadesque 7+ Year Member

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    Well...the averages across all 9 schools comes out to about a 3.3 cum./3.1 sci + 23 MCAT, but what I've noticed is the schools are a bit more forgiving than say a traditional MD school. You can get interviews with a sub 3.0 GPA if your MCAT score is above average and vice versa. People her have gotten in with 19-20 on their MCAT if their GPA was good. If OP scored a 24 on the MCAT he/she would be fine at the larger schools (I think the smallest school is AZPod so their criteria is higher like a 3.5/24)
     
  8. ucfgrad10

    ucfgrad10 Mr. Meaty Calves 5+ Year Member

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    You should consider it, if it's something you want to do. Don't do it if you aren't sure. Don't do it based on your gpa, mcat, etc. Don't do it just because you want to be a doctor. I wasn't sure what I wanted to do after I graduated undergrad, so I took a few years off and found out this is what I want. My habits in undergrad weren't great, which scared me going into this without taking any sort of classes for two years. However, I have changed my habits drastically and am succeeding. If you aren't sure what you want, my advice is take some time off, however long it takes and find out what you want. Then take the jump.
     
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  9. poopsmcgeethe3rd

    poopsmcgeethe3rd

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    yes i know it is hard. i dont think my undergrad gpa reflects on my skills since i was merely coasting, just gettong by.i do need to change my habits but after working in **** jobs like retail made me realized i dont wanna do that ****, made me more humble, and need to work my ass off, take what i want. ive always had a little foot fetish especially towards female feet, wonder if that matters hehehe. i do realize how hard it is. ive seeb people stats go alot lower than what i have. the 3 year residency deters me a bit since thats alot. i do wanna be my own boss and have my own clinic. i feel like if me and my relative go at it together that we can embark on this journey and create our own business. im willing to work extremely hard since i have been down in the dumps amd open my eyes to how ****ty life can be working in crap jobs. i do need to refine my study skills, will read some books on that. also i heard the student loans isnt too much compared to the other professions, that is a plus
     
    Last edited: 05.13.14
  10. LittleMopeHead

    LittleMopeHead 2+ Year Member

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    Foot fetish?? That's a little scary. Just hope that doesn't affect your future in podiatry if you decide to go this route. When you say you want to embark on this journey with your relative, do you mean working together in a clinic that you both own? If so, I have a little bit of advice from what I learned in practice management classes. They say it can be a good thing or it can be one of the worst decisions of your life. There are stories of students who think they'll work with a relative after residency, thinking they'll get along with a relative, working together and all, but things just don't work out. It can be very problematic in many different ways that it is better to work alone or with another group. For some, it may work out peacefully. Just a heads up. Things can change between now and then too.

    Three years of residency training is a requirement and from what I hear it is where you truly learn the stuff. In all, you have to decide if this is what you really want to do, and that you are committed to 7 years of your life in rigorous learning, dedication, and to sacrifice lots of time, special events, holidays, etc.
     
  11. poopsmcgeethe3rd

    poopsmcgeethe3rd

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    me and the rekative can go thru the school together, help study etc... ur prob right about working together. 3 years of residency sounds like a bitch. also the unmatched residency ive been reading abut scares me. if it was 4 years and done then i would heavily consider it even more, still iffy. 7 years of your life set in stone is alot. what to do...
     
  12. didymus

    didymus

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    This part of your response was intriguing to me. Are the attrition rates relatively high for podiatry schools?
     
  13. heybrother

    heybrother 5+ Year Member

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    Yes.
     
  14. didymus

    didymus

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    Do you have any personal insight/opinions as to why this is the case? I'm genuinely curious.
     
  15. jellybean2020

    jellybean2020 5+ Year Member

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    It's pretty simple. Podiatry is not a very well known field and struggles to attract high quality applicants. As a result it's very easy to get into podiatry school, and invariably some people get accepted who have no business being in professional school. The problem is there's a big difficulty spike once you're in (especially I imagine at the schools where you take classes with the DO students). It's not possible to scrape by with the same study habits or effort level from undergrad. You have to step your game up, especially if you slacked off in the past. Most people learn and adapt within the first semester. Some people figure it out too late.
     
    Last edited: 05.16.14
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  16. LittleMopeHead

    LittleMopeHead 2+ Year Member

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    Yes, as many would agree. Schools are money hungry (non profit or not) and they'll accept students up to the maximum number regulated by CPME. A lot of the students do fail out first or second semester due to failing courses or personal problems that they may face during their study. Some fail out because they can't handle the course load and the school does a good job at making it hard, but not impossible. Larger schools, for example, may start out with 100 students and can lose 10-15 students after first semester, then a few more second semester, and may end up with 70-80 students by end of second year. Jellybean sums it up exactly how I see it too.
     
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  17. heybrother

    heybrother 5+ Year Member

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    I've been told that in a few years the schools will be required to release their attrition and board pass rates, but I'm not holding my breath. If you believe SDN there are some schools with attrition rates approaching or exceeding 20%. If you attend IPMSA meetings they occasionally release numbers about the class sizes from year to year and those can give you a rough idea of the attrition from year to year (double-digit). What surprised me when I looked at them was that I didn't see anything resembling "board pass rate dropoff". There's an expected big drop from 1st year to second year, but considering that the pass rate for board part 1 is usually in the mid-80s you'd think we'd see more people lost between 2nd and 3rd year or that they wouldn't let those people pass on to 4th year. Either everyone eventually passes part 1 or the schools are dragging them along and not cutting them.
     
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  18. Ankle Breaker

    Ankle Breaker Senior Member 5+ Year Member

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    I wouldn't hold my breath either on schools being forced to release attrition rates and board pass rates or even match rates. Schools are notorious for dispersing such information only when they have a really good year. DMU is the only school that I know of that officially lists their information on their website but I haven't heard anything from them this year since I believe they had a not "DMU-caliber" match rate this year. Scholl is notorious for pulling these hijinks and will be the first ones to tell you how great their match rate was this year when they got smoked the last two years. Typical.

    As for an example of the kind of attrition rate shenanigans going on, here is an example from Scholl 2014:

    - 96 students in 2010
    - 80 students in 2014
    - Of 80 students we add: 1 DPM/PhD student, 3 students from class of 2013, and 1 student who transferred into our school
    - 75/96 remaining
    - 22% attrition from the original class of 96
    - Now, technically some of the students who were no longer in our class went to the class of 2015. Therefore, technically, they are still enrolled.
    - If schools were ever force to release this information the above example shows how schools could get around not divulging true numbers. In fact if some schools just move all academically weak students to the next class then they could still say their attrition rate is really low when in reality they are just moving bad students around who may or may not match in the end but were never dismissed from school officially.
     
  19. hughesn2

    hughesn2 2+ Year Member

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    Some of the information posted here is what I did research on and is a big reason why I myself have gone from my past HS and first 3yrs of college dreams of being a physician to rather wanting to go into Biostatistics or Epidemiology. At the start of my senior year at Michigan State I had a 3.38 GPA and was looking at PA schools and hoping that my classes ahead of me weren't all that challenging and boy was I wrong. When I selected my major my sophomore year the counselors made it sound as if a Human Physiology degree was marketable outside of a goal of attending MD, DO, or PA school...and boy they lied their @$$ off to me. I graduated in 4.5 yrs and I remember going to talk to them in my first senior year to talk about backup plans and they told me the complete opposite of what they said two years ago and stated that really the ONLY thing you can do with your job is apply to med school or a masters program in biomedical sciences. My last three semesters consisted of taking probably 5 of the 10 most failed classes at MSU, in which all 5 were class ranked graded where the students you were competing with majority of the students already accepted to an MD or DO school and graduated with at least 3.6 GPA. When you have 5 classes where the bottom 30% automatically get a 1.5 grade or less you know that you are taking classes where the professors only cared about the success of the most brilliant students and could care less about the bottom 30% of the students. I graduated with a 3.19 GPA and a science+math GPA of a 3.01.

    I always wanted to be a doctor and in 8th grade I realized I wanted to be a podiatrist. When I was a senior in HS I was under the impression that the only way you could become a podiatrist was if you went to MD school and you specialized in podiatry in your 3rd & 4th years at med school and then residency. I got to Michigan State and even was part of a residential college that was majority pre-med students and even the counselors my freshman year told me that the route stated above was the way you became a podiatrist. So for me, after my freshman year I knew I didn't have the grades to ever make it to MD schools, so I went down the PA route. Then I found out about podiatry in my 7th semester at MSU. My 7th, 8th semester I told myself my passion was to go down the podiatry school route. But while I was studying for the MCAT last May I was really wondering why I wanted to become a physician and it was haunting me. I already shadowed a podiatrist and liked it, but I kinda told myself I loved it. Truth was that I didn't really LOVE what he did, but since he was my podiatrist and a very close family friend and one of the best podiatrist in SE Michigan I told myself that I would love that route for a career. One of the best things that happened to me was my lab partner for my final semester in the Fall of 2013 was applying to a Masters of Public Health school and tell you the truth, the classes I have taken of diseases and mathematics were much more interesting to me than my physio and biochem courses, which I had already been told would be as challenging of courses as it will be at the med school since MSU decides to have harder undergrad physio and biochem courses than at the med school level by a wide margin.

    Unfortunately, my parents didn't like my idea at all. I told them that I had no plans on going back to the podiatry route and they practically forced me to go back to the podiatry route. I told them I had no passion and they just believed that I was giving up because it would be hard. Really, the attrition rate is a big part of why I freaked out about the schools too. Some people may think 20% is worth the risk, but to me no way!!! I use to have a passion but really after being a physiology major it has taught me that I don't love the human body as much as I would dealing with diseases and statistics. After the 20% attrition rate there is then the residency shortage as well. I sit there and think that after 4yrs med school, 3yrs residency it wouldn't be till I was age 31 before I started my career as a physician and that is if I even make it. The way I look at it is that I may have a good enough GPA to get accepted, but do I have good enough GPA of making it through?? I don't doubt myself, but I didn't do so well in my 400 level biochem I&II or physio classes (I and II) in undergrad so what is it gonna be like in med school.

    Too bad for me, my parents kept forcing me to go down the med school route when I told them I wanted to take the GRE for MPH or other masters programs in January so I can apply by mid February and have a chance at getting in...yeah they didn't like it and still told me to take the MCAT. I was studying for the MCAT from mid February to early April and just hated it because I had no passion on going to podiatry school. They think I have been studying for the MCAT since mid April, when in fact I have been studying to take the GRE and apply to master's programs in August so I can get into the 2015 cycle.

    As I reflect back at college, I wish my counselors didn't baby me to make me think my GPA was good enough to get into PA schools to start off. I wish they did a better job at explaining how challenging a major is and noticing that here comes a kid who had just a 3.20 GPA after 3 semesters of college asking you how challenging this major really is and you straight up lie to his face by saying it isn't that challenging and no more than 3 semesters later telling this same kid that he decided to take the hardest major the college offers at the Natural Science college.

    For me, I don't want to go down the route of depression to become a doctor. I know I am not the smartest person, or even close, but I also know I am not stupid. Yet, podiatry med school is still a type of medical school and will be just as hard of schooling as the DO students will take. I would love to know the stats from schools of how the bottom 25% of their entering students do their freshman year because really to me the average GPA of the dropouts is just as important as the GPA of the entering students as a whole.
     
  20. LittleMopeHead

    LittleMopeHead 2+ Year Member

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    In the end, it will be YOU who has to decide on what to do. If you think going down the "doctor" route is depressing, then do what you think is best for you. Don't take influences from your friends, parents, or anybody. Decide what you're good at and see yourself doing for the rest of your life, and go for it. It all comes with a plan (goal), and then executing the plan. Seems like undegrad was rough for you because you were lied to, undecided, and also unprepared for what's to come. You can't take back what's already passed, but to move forward now. Do what you're good at and you'll succeed and be happier. Plan now.
     
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  21. didymus

    didymus

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    Do you come from an Asian and/or Indian family by chance? Your situation sounds very similar to that of some friends of mine with these cultural backgrounds. I know that often times parents can wield an incredible amount of influence over an individual, especially one from a culture where the chief authority in one's life is his or her parents. So no advice to "go and be yourself," really helps. This is, in fact, what you need to do, but it sounds like your folks won't be satisfied unless you become a doctor.

    It could be good to talk about your desires using language they understand. You can discuss with them the opportunities for PhD's in public health or epidemiology--and the science and rigor of these fields. Surely your folks have respect for PhD's (though some parents only want to hear, "Doctor, engineer, or lawyer," and nothing else matters).

    The right advice is for you to do what you are passionate about, but I totally hear what you are saying, and stepping outside of what your parents are pushing you to do can be incredibly difficult, and even seem impossible.

    All that said to say I wish you the very best. I can imagine how difficult this has been for you, and I'm sorry.
     
  22. hughesn2

    hughesn2 2+ Year Member

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    No, I actually come from a family of an engineer and a journalism major (but my mom has not used her journalism degree since I was born). The main reason they refused to believe that I really wanted to go out of the medical route is because among my group of 25+ friends I was always the ONLY person who desired to go down the physician route and that I went from PA to podiatry in my junior year. They practically believe that I am just giving up because it is hard and will be challenging. Another issue I have is that I have a cousin who is at the top 5% of her class at MSU's DO school and my entire family thinks I could do exactly like that. My difference is that she is without a doubt the smartest person I know, she is a UofM Neuroscience grad and as bright as anybody. Me on the other hand I know that I disliked my physiology classes, but my disease physiology class inspired me and I loved it. Issue is, if I was a podiatrist that is not what I would be doing. It does make it hard that I am surrounded my my large group of friends that are all B.A. graduates. Other than my two friends that are nurses, I think other than me the only other three people that I actually have hung out with from HS that are in the sciences (two are engineers, the other is a biochem major and all 3 were some of the biggest slackers in HS). So for me, my parents still see me as the HS student who could get a 3.90 GPA without studying, but that was HS not college. Sometimes I wish I had friends (not family) applying to the med school route or who had a science major who could explain the difficulties it is now to get into med schools. My parents still think that getting into med school or a PA program is one of those things where "Hey, they'll accept you because you were a nice guy." NO!

    I currently work as a nurse aide and I deal with the elderly patients all the time and I already knew that they would be most of my patients as a podiatrist, but it kind of frustrates me if I would be working all day and mostly with uneducated patients and have to wait till I am 42 to pay off my loans.

    An addition is more that to me, I ask myself "If I was freaking out during undergrad with a degree most relevant to a physicians understanding, then I would have to change my whole study tactics to succeed."

    But for other people trying to make a pick between a career I just advise that you do more research and volunteering when you are a freshman or sophomore. I did those stupid volunteering opportunities at a hospital I live a couple miles away from and that wasn't enough because all you were was an unpaid janitor. Really the attrition rate to me is the main reason I really don't want to go down the podiatry school route. Come 2015's cycle they may still be ACCEPTING the 3.19 GPA students with a 20-23 MCAT score, but the correlation between the low grades is correlated to those that drop out. I had an old friend who went to a DO school out of state and he told me that even after putting in the $40K deposit for the first two semesters and 1/8 of his class realized they couldn't handle it. I don't want others to think to GIVE UP, but trust your instincts and look back at your undergrad studies and think that podiatry school's academics are going to be just as challenging as med school.

    The part that makes it harder for me to tell my parents is more that they FORCED me to take that KAPLAN MCAT course. All of December and January I told them I had no plan on going to podiatry and then they put my grandma to talk to me & turn it into a guilt trick to force me to go back to the podiatry med school route. So since February one of the very few reasons I really wanted to go down the podiatry route was because my grandma wanted me to. That is no way to attack a career field. Then my parents pulled the guilt trick of telling me how my podiatrist who took me under his wing would be disappointed. So practically many of the guilt tricks had to deal with someone being disappointed in me. So I took the KAPLAN course despite at no point in the class did I think my passion was becoming a physician. So now it is a little harder to tell them since my grandma spent $2,000 for me to take a KAPLAN course that did practically nothing for me since I had no passion for it in the beginning.
     
  23. LittleMopeHead

    LittleMopeHead 2+ Year Member

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    After reading this, I really feel sorry for your parents and mostly your grandma for putting that kind of money and investment on you, after you've "tricked" them into thinking that you are doing it to get into medical school. This could have been a lot easier and less frustrating if you'd tell them straight on that "No, I'm not going to medical school. Period" and refuse what they were forcing you to do. But instead, you dragged this along and set yourself for shame and a lot more disappointment. If you have no passion for medicine (podiatry), then don't play along and refuse what others are forcing you to do. Tell them how you feel and exactly what you are doing. Seems to me that you are afraid to be a disappointing child by saying no to them and in turn make things worse by lying and tricking them. Do yourself a favor and get yourself together on this. Go apologize to your folks and really tell them how you feel about all this before it's too late. It will come back to haunt you again and again, one way or another. Being forced to something is one thing, but going at it and pretending to get by is a very sad thing. Go apologize now. You'll feel better and the result may be happier for you and everyone.
     
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  24. mildoc2016

    mildoc2016 resident 7+ Year Member

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    the op stats are good enought to get in to one of the schools with larger sclass sizes.

    Podiatry school is not a cakewalk you will have to apply yourself

    attrition rates are high.
    challenges is getting pass boards I and in the end getting a residency spot
    no residency certificate--- no job / no state licence, no license you cannot practice
     
  25. hughesn2

    hughesn2 2+ Year Member

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    LittleMopeHead,

    I think you misreading some of it, but you are somewhat correct. I unfortunately told myself in late January to late March that I wanted to go back into podiatry but really it was me just trying to find out what to do with my life. I do consider myself a joke at points because I literally don't have the guts to tell my parents that I don't want to go into podiatry and now it is worse because I was working as a CNA at a long term care center. I quit after just 60 days because that job was just awful. So really the only reason I was in that job by mid April was just to receive an $850 paycheck and put $300 of that to my student loans each paycheck.
    Now that this job is not a hassle to my health due to working midnight shifts where I got 5hrs of sleep per morning anymore it may be easier for me to tell my family.

    I understand how you would feel that and trust me, even I think I am an A-hole for letting my parents think I do want to still pursue a career in podiatry for the last month and a half.
     
  26. didymus

    didymus

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    Just take care of business and don't let it wreck your life. Life will go on, you will discover a field in which you can best apply yourself, your family will forgive, and you will one day look back on this time in your life as having been seminal to your success.

    All the best to you.
     

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