could some one help me (desi dentist)

Discussion in 'Dental' started by keerthi, Sep 21, 2002.

  1. keerthi

    keerthi Junior Member
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    I am a dentist graduated from india.Iwas planning to come to us.I have taken my TOEFL & GRE .what is the procedure of getting a licence toI practice in US.
    Do i have to studyagain, or clear vsome exams.Hope you give me some valuable suggestions & guide me through.
     
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  3. merl

    merl Member
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    Hi Keerthi,

    A foreign graduate has to attend few yrs of (under graduate dds dmd program in US) to practice here in US. For complete info go to ADA web site.
     
  4. Leon

    Leon Member
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    Hey ... is that really necessary ?
    Can't I practice dentistry if I get my DMD not in the US ?

    Do you really have to get american DMD/DDS degree or you can apply for GPR (or some other residency) of the degree you get in another country and practice dentistry following the completion of the residency ?

    Thanks ! :)
    Leon
     
  5. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    One exception may be graduates of Canadian dental schools whom I believe may sit for any of the various licensing board exams throughout the USA. And, in the state New York, graduates of Canadian dental schools, like graduates of USA dental schools,l may only have to complete a GPR in order to be licensed to practice in New York. I believe graduates of all other foreign dental schools must complete what amounts to the last two years of training at a USA dental school to earn a USA DDS/DMD degree before they are even elibible to be examined by a licensing board which is the final authority on whether or not one can legally practice dentistry in the USA..
     
  6. saravs

    saravs Member
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    As far as I know you have to get a D.D.S/D.M.D from some school in the U.S/ Canada and then clear the licensing exam to practise in that particular region. For many of the Regional Licensing board examinations it is necessary for you to have obtained dental education from either the US or Canadian Universities. California has something else going in there but for every other state this rule holds good I think. I m not sure what the deal is after a residency though.
    saravs
     
  7. Leon

    Leon Member
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    Well ... I'm kind of an outsider, so I might not have an up-to-date info. I still have 3 more years of my dental school ... but I just love dreaming about the future :D :D :D

    Anyway ... the guys in the predental phorum are talking about the "golden age in dentistry" - more dentist retiring than graduating in US, thus creating a shortage of dentists that will only increase in the next 10 years. So my guess is that the authorities might lighten up on their demands in order to fight this shortage ...

    But that would be just a guess :eek:
    Anyway - good luck to you, guys ! :)

    P.S.
    If you use the ICQ - maybe we could improve our communication and exchange info and thoughts more effectively ... what do you think ? My UIN is 57404828, and you're welcome to knock my door :)
     
  8. keerthi

    keerthi Junior Member
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    thank you guys , i was thinking which states are easier fo me to get a licence.
    any one of you through the procedures of getting a licence?
    do you think part 1 of the NBDE would be tough for me?
     
  9. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Leon,
    The ADA is well aware of what happened in the USA medical community when medicare/medicaid funded residencies opened the flood gates to graduates of foreign medical schools. You can bet the homestead that the ADA will lobby hard to keep things as they are. Well, that is politics. However, in actuality, some of the dental service provider shortages that appear to be on the horizon will likely be alleviated by advancements in biotechnology which will increase the productivity of dentists over time.
     
  10. Leon

    Leon Member
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    Well, Grounghog ...
    I think you do have a point ...

    But still - if there's gonna be a shortage, I believe they won't have a choice but opening up the gates a little bit. I'm not saying that saying "I'm a dentist" will be enough to get a license, but they might lighten up on the demand of completing 2 additional years of dental school to get the US degree.

    Furthermore - there are residecies that accept foreign graduates. It's ain't easy to get in - but it's possible. And if there will be a shortage - many of the US graduates will give up residencies being able to make quite a living right out of school. I've seen this situation in Israel ... when the market becomes saturated with dentists, the residencies become more and more competitive, and obviously the vice versa.

    You might be right, but I wish that I am :rolleyes:

    Btw ... what's your background ? :)

    Leon
     
  11. crimson

    crimson What up Smokey!
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    groundhog,
    what happened in "the USA medical community when medicare/medicaid funded residencies opened the flood gates to graduates of foreign medical schools."?? (sounds very alarmist!!) From what I know this country was able to enjoy some of the best health care in the world facilitated by foreign doctors who were willing to serve underserved communities from Alaska to Arkansas. Not to mention fill the acute shortage in some high demand specialities. Knowledge professions by construct are going to be increasingly borderless and it is not in the best interest of any country to act protectionist. Through the last three decads this country has been fortunate to be home for most of the most intelligent, motivated and well-trained medical professionals from around the world.
     
  12. Leon

    Leon Member
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    Right :
    1) this country was able to enjoy some of the best health care in the world facilitated by foreign doctors who were willing to serve underserved communities from Alaska to Arkansas
    2)Knowledge professions by construct are going to be increasingly borderless
    3)Through the last three decads this country has been fortunate to be home for most of the most intelligent, motivated and well-trained medical professionals from around the world.

    Wrong :
    1) it is not in the best interest of any country to act protectionist.

    It's the rules of the free market that make the decision : when you're short of specialists - you import them (e.g. by making it easier on them to enter the country). when the market is saturated - you create boundaries against new-comers. As simple as that :)

    Some say that there will be a shortage of dentists in the states. Therefore some states might lighten up the prerequisites for licensing foreign dentists in order to keep the current oral health level. :)
     
  13. groundhog

    groundhog 1K Member
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    Crimson,
    I do not disagree. As to what happened........The medicare/medicaid funded medcial residency program (which has been significantly reduced) was one factor amongst others which enabled the insurance industry to get a strangle hold on the medical professions via the much maligned HMO programs. So, my point is that the ADA will strongly resist any government driven initiatives that could be viewed as helping to funnel dentists into the same type of working environment that physicians find to be so frustrating today.
     

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