DAT: PAT struggles

someafrican

Full Member
Dec 3, 2015
25
6
  1. Pre-Dental
    Hi!

    So I have started to practice with Crack the DAT for the PAT section and honestly, I suck at most of the PAT portion. I just can't visualize Top-Front-End, Hole Punching, and pattern folding.

    Any advice on what to do, or any helpful visual links anyone found helpful?

    Thanks!
     

    teauxmo13

    Full Member
    Jun 9, 2014
    148
    128
    1. Pre-Dental
      Hi!

      So I have started to practice with Crack the DAT for the PAT section and honestly, I suck at most of the PAT portion. I just can't visualize Top-Front-End, Hole Punching, and pattern folding.

      Any advice on what to do, or any helpful visual links anyone found helpful?

      Thanks!
      YouTube lookup "DAT PAT" tons of how-to videos on the different sections.
       
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      Sewanee13

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      Jun 7, 2015
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        I only used bootcamp to study and got a 28. I've always been sorta perceptual minded I guess, but bootcamp helped a TON with getting used to the problems. not to mention more practice in the other sections of the test. With the PAT, it comes down to practicing over and over and over again, Bootcamp has almost an endless question bank. Short answer: PRACTICE each question. spend like 3 months leading up to the test practicing PAT everyday (along with other sections of course).

        HP: another huge part is setting up your scratch paper before starting the PAT section. Use the break time (don't linger in the hallway/pee too long) to draw the grid before the PAT starts. you'll be given a gridded paper for the exam. if it isn't gridded, ask for one. if one is not provided, draw the grid to the best of your ability (practice drawing the grid). the hole punching also is something you'll have to practice, but eventually it will just click. don't be discouraged if it doesn't make sense. practice the other sections and they will help you with hole punching and put your brain in the right place, then come back to it later.

        CUBE: Draw out a table for the cube counting section: one column numbered vertically 0-5, and 5 vertical columns thereafter (one for each different figure; 3-5 questions per figure). At each new figure, CAREFULLY count each square and talley next to the amount of sides exposed. You should eventually get to the point where you talley without having to go back and double check your counting. then boom boom knock out each of the questions.

        TFE will come with practice. Take the practice exams on bootcamp and figure out how each figure is presented, and really zoom-out mentally and picture the figure in your mind. Don't rely on your eyes as much as your brain. see what your eyes cant by creating the figure from the different sides you're seeing. what I did, was do this when driving around or looking around day to day. As you look across the room at a classmate or a desk, imagine what the other side of the desk looks like and picture drawing that down on the paper for someone. when climbing into your car, imagine what the car would look like if someone were standing behind it and to the right...that sort of thing. do this ANYTIME you can and think about it (I was pretty compulsive about it).
        FOLDING: Like TFE, imagine unfolding a person or a computer while you're sitting in traffic or in a restaurant. On your napkin, draw what your cup would look like unfolded, taking into account the curve.

        KEY: practice
        ANGLE: you know it or you don't. some are easy, some are there to steal your time. Don't be afraid of it. still practice, but don't be discouraged if you can't get them all.

        I wrote this very quickly, let me know if you have any other questions, I'm happy to be a resource. I loved the PAT.
         
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        someafrican

        Full Member
        Dec 3, 2015
        25
        6
        1. Pre-Dental
          I only used bootcamp to study and got a 28. I've always been sorta perceptual minded I guess, but bootcamp helped a TON with getting used to the problems. not to mention more practice in the other sections of the test. With the PAT, it comes down to practicing over and over and over again, Bootcamp has almost an endless question bank. Short answer: PRACTICE each question. spend like 3 months leading up to the test practicing PAT everyday (along with other sections of course).

          HP: another huge part is setting up your scratch paper before starting the PAT section. Use the break time (don't linger in the hallway/pee too long) to draw the grid before the PAT starts. you'll be given a gridded paper for the exam. if it isn't gridded, ask for one. if one is not provided, draw the grid to the best of your ability (practice drawing the grid). the hole punching also is something you'll have to practice, but eventually it will just click. don't be discouraged if it doesn't make sense. practice the other sections and they will help you with hole punching and put your brain in the right place, then come back to it later.

          CUBE: Draw out a table for the cube counting section: one column numbered vertically 0-5, and 5 vertical columns thereafter (one for each different figure; 3-5 questions per figure). At each new figure, CAREFULLY count each square and talley next to the amount of sides exposed. You should eventually get to the point where you talley without having to go back and double check your counting. then boom boom knock out each of the questions.

          TFE will come with practice. Take the practice exams on bootcamp and figure out how each figure is presented, and really zoom-out mentally and picture the figure in your mind. Don't rely on your eyes as much as your brain. see what your eyes cant by creating the figure from the different sides you're seeing. what I did, was do this when driving around or looking around day to day. As you look across the room at a classmate or a desk, imagine what the other side of the desk looks like and picture drawing that down on the paper for someone. when climbing into your car, imagine what the car would look like if someone were standing behind it and to the right...that sort of thing. do this ANYTIME you can and think about it (I was pretty compulsive about it).
          FOLDING: Like TFE, imagine unfolding a person or a computer while you're sitting in traffic or in a restaurant. On your napkin, draw what your cup would look like unfolded, taking into account the curve.

          KEY: practice
          ANGLE: you know it or you don't. some are easy, some are there to steal your time. Don't be afraid of it. still practice, but don't be discouraged if you can't get them all.

          I wrote this very quickly, let me know if you have any other questions, I'm happy to be a resource. I loved the PAT.

          omg thank you! i appreciate your advice, will definitely try that out and ask/message you if I have any questions! :)
           

          Cello

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          Sep 10, 2011
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          1. Dentist
            I purchased index cards and cut them in in half so they would be square. Then I folded them up to be like what was shown on the hole punch, and used a hole punch to make the holes. After doing that a few times I was consistently scoring 100% on the hole punch section.

            I did pretty much the same thing for pattern folding and used a marker to color the patterns. Once I was comfortable with pattern folding, then I started testing myself for time.

            For TFE, I recommend going to your school library and sitting down with a CAD program. If you can grab some CAD views with TFE, then you will be much better off on the DAT.

            My PAT was a 26 and I think that using these methods early on helped me to build a solid foundation. A warning though, I was not at all prepared for the rock figures on TFE.
             
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            BiologyMajor86

            Full Member
            Feb 2, 2016
            40
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            1. Pre-Medical
              Provided you thoroughly read each explanation on Bootcamp, you are golden for PAT. Quite honestly, PAT starts becoming fun after it clicks. I started off with a 15 on Kaplan's practice test (notoriously easy), and now comfortably in the 25+ range in Bootcamp. It becomes pretty repetitive after time. Hang in there.
               
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              alasra

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              Feb 28, 2015
              130
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              1. Pre-Dental
                TFE is my favorite section and my best section. Like others have mentioned, Bootcamp is KEY. Here's a link for the free TFE bootcamp generators: http://datbootcamp.com/classroom/perceptual-ability/top-front-end-visualizer/

                For this section you HAVE to visualize it, there is no shortcut. The best way to go about it is to first truly understand what the top, front, and end views of the object represent. If you're looking at the top view, then you need to realize that the bottom part is the front view and the right part is the end view.The front view is the same: the right part represents the end view and the top part represents the top view. In the end view, and here it gets a little tricky: the LEFT part represents the front view and the top part represents the top view. Does that make sense? Watch the video that is available for free on bootcamp to help you better understand. Figure out how to rotate the object in your head so the views they give you make sense. As you probably know already, the dotted lines mean that the there is something "hidden" that you will be able to see from another view. Solid lines mean that you can see the stuff from that view.

                Take a while for each question to just visualize each object. Don't feel pressure to answer the question ASAP, because you NEED to understand how to visualize the object. The more time you take now for understanding, the quicker you'll get later on.

                I hope this helps! I'm trying to figure out pattern folding now :)
                 
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