Quantcast

DDS and DMD

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Toothinator

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
120
Reaction score
1
"The DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) and DMD (Doctor of Dental Medicine) are the same degrees. The difference is a matter of semantics. The majority of dental schools award the DDS degree; however, some award a DMD degree. The education and degrees are the same."

http://www.ada.org/public/topics/dds_dmd.asp
 

turtmd

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
49
Reaction score
0
Ok, that's what I thought but someone in this forum said that is better to find a school that gives the DDS because w/a DMD you can't do surgery and you needed to the get an approval..or something of that nature..so that kind of confused me. :confused:

Toothinator said:
"The DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) and DMD (Doctor of Dental Medicine) are the same degrees. The difference is a matter of semantics. The majority of dental schools award the DDS degree; however, some award a DMD degree. The education and degrees are the same."

http://www.ada.org/public/topics/dds_dmd.asp
 

duh?

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2005
Messages
847
Reaction score
0
They were just trying to be funny. Maybe this will teach us to make it clear when we're goofing around so that we don't mislead people that come here to get info about dentistry.
 

howui3

1K Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
1,147
Reaction score
1
there is no difference in education, just in your title.
 

polarnut

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2004
Messages
881
Reaction score
3
i heard DMD's are sexier in general
 

Dr. Dai Phan

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
155
turtmd said:
What is the difference between a DMD and DDS degree?

Hello,

I do too have many patients asked me the difference between the two. Well, the difference is DDS is Doctor of Dental Surgery and DMD stands for Doctor of Dental Medicine. DDS is a traditional tittle and the other is more modern one. Training between those two degrees is indentical. Now, for historical background, do you know why there was such two tittles? In the past, dental students who were trained along with medical students were awarded the DMD as the dental students who were trained in the dental schools were given the DDS. Today, all dental students have their own schools so DDS and DMD is the same. I read this information from an encyclopedia so I thought it was an interesting historical information to share with you. Can't tell if that is true through...

One time, a classmate of mine transfered from a school in St.Louis told me that DMD students can do complex oral surgeries while DDS students can't!!! I later found out that person also said that preseason scores in NFL counts only if the two teams have the same records at the end of the regular season! He also told me that college football only have 8 yards to go for a first down as opposed to 10 in the NFL!!! And you know what, at the time I believed him... Naieve me DP
 

SuperC

SuperC DMD
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2005
Messages
772
Reaction score
7
Dr..... You information appears to be incorrect ....

Pulled from the net....

Many people, including dentists, share your confusion over the use of the D.D.S. and D.M.D. degrees. Today, some dental schools grant a D.D.S. degree and others prefer to award the D.M.D. degree instead. The training the dentists receive is very similar but the degree granted is different. Here are the details:

Ancient medicine was divided into two groups:

1. the surgery group that dealt with treating diseases and injuries using instruments; and
2. the medicine group that dealt with healing diseases using internal remedies. Originally there was only the D.D.S. degree which stands for Doctor of Dental Surgery.

This all changed in 1867 when Harvard University added a dental school. Harvard University only grants degrees in Latin. Harvard did not adopt the D.D.S. or "Doctor of Dental Surgery" degree because the Latin translation was "Chirurgae Dentium Doctoris" or C.D.D. The people at Harvard thought that C.D.D. was cumbersome. A Latin scholar was consulted. The scholar suggested the ancient "Medicinae Doctor" be prefixed with "Dentariae". This is how the D.M.D. or "Dentariae Medicinae Doctor" degree was started. (Congratulations! Now you probably know more Latin than most dentists!)

At the turn of the century, there were 57 dental schools in the U.S. but only Harvard and Oregon awarded the D.M.D. In 1989, 23 of the 66 North American dental schools awarded the D.M.D. I think about half the Canadian dental schools now award the D.M.D. degree.

The American Dental Association (A.D.A.) is aware of the public confusion surrounding these degrees. The A.D.A. has tried on several occasions to reduce this confusion. Several sample proposals include:

1. eliminate the D.M.D. degree;
2. eliminate the D.D.S. degree; or
3. eliminate both degrees and invent a brand new degree that every dental school will agree to use.

Unfortunately, this confusion may be with us for a long time. When emotional factors like "school pride" and "tradition" arise, it is difficult to find a compromise.

1. Crawford, P.R., "To be or not to be: DDS or DMD," Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, (August 1989) 55(8):639-640.
2. Griggs, D., "The DDS vs. DMD situation," Journal of the American Dental Association, (April 1974) 88(4):691-693.
3. Hillenbrand, H., "DDS or DMD: The glacial period," Journal of Dental Education, (July 1972) 36(7):3.
4. Letter, "The DDS-DMD issue," Journal of the American Dental Association, (June 1974) 88(6):1241.
5. Robinson J.B., "DDS or DMD: Footnotes to dental history," Journal of Dental Education, (January 1973) 37(1):17-20.
 

Dr. Dai Phan

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
155
SuperC said:
Dr..... You information appears to be incorrect ....

Pulled from the net....

Many people, including dentists, share your confusion over the use of the D.D.S. and D.M.D. degrees. Today, some dental schools grant a D.D.S. degree and others prefer to award the D.M.D. degree instead. The training the dentists receive is very similar but the degree granted is different. Here are the details:

Ancient medicine was divided into two groups:

1. the surgery group that dealt with treating diseases and injuries using instruments; and
2. the medicine group that dealt with healing diseases using internal remedies. Originally there was only the D.D.S. degree which stands for Doctor of Dental Surgery.

This all changed in 1867 when Harvard University added a dental school. Harvard University only grants degrees in Latin. Harvard did not adopt the D.D.S. or "Doctor of Dental Surgery" degree because the Latin translation was "Chirurgae Dentium Doctoris" or C.D.D. The people at Harvard thought that C.D.D. was cumbersome. A Latin scholar was consulted. The scholar suggested the ancient "Medicinae Doctor" be prefixed with "Dentariae". This is how the D.M.D. or "Dentariae Medicinae Doctor" degree was started. (Congratulations! Now you probably know more Latin than most dentists!)

At the turn of the century, there were 57 dental schools in the U.S. but only Harvard and Oregon awarded the D.M.D. In 1989, 23 of the 66 North American dental schools awarded the D.M.D. I think about half the Canadian dental schools now award the D.M.D. degree.

The American Dental Association (A.D.A.) is aware of the public confusion surrounding these degrees. The A.D.A. has tried on several occasions to reduce this confusion. Several sample proposals include:

1. eliminate the D.M.D. degree;
2. eliminate the D.D.S. degree; or
3. eliminate both degrees and invent a brand new degree that every dental school will agree to use.

Unfortunately, this confusion may be with us for a long time. When emotional factors like "school pride" and "tradition" arise, it is difficult to find a compromise.

1. Crawford, P.R., "To be or not to be: DDS or DMD," Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, (August 1989) 55(8):639-640.
2. Griggs, D., "The DDS vs. DMD situation," Journal of the American Dental Association, (April 1974) 88(4):691-693.
3. Hillenbrand, H., "DDS or DMD: The glacial period," Journal of Dental Education, (July 1972) 36(7):3.
4. Letter, "The DDS-DMD issue," Journal of the American Dental Association, (June 1974) 88(6):1241.
5. Robinson J.B., "DDS or DMD: Footnotes to dental history," Journal of Dental Education, (January 1973) 37(1):17-20.

Hello,

I too have read that through the Net. What part of my statement is incorrect? DP
 

polarnut

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2004
Messages
881
Reaction score
3
Dr. Dai Phan said:
What part of my statement is incorrect? DP

the part where you said dental students who were trained along with medical students were awarded the DMD as the dental students who were trained in the dental schools were given the DDS
 

SuperC

SuperC DMD
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2005
Messages
772
Reaction score
7
polarnut said:
the part where you said dental students who were trained along with medical students were awarded the DMD as the dental students who were trained in the dental schools were given the DDS

Thanks.... I had not gotten back to this.
-C
 

Dr. Dai Phan

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
155
Hello,

As I said in my statement, I can't be sure if that is correct though... I myself do not know if it is true. But I read that thorough an online encyclopedia and I will try to find the link for you. DP

PS: Here is the link. I wouldn't take it for heart though...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Dental_Surgery
 

aphistis

Full Member
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2003
Messages
8,394
Reaction score
37
Dr. Dai Phan said:
Hello,

As I said in my statement, I can't be sure if that is correct though... I myself do not know if it is true. But I read that thorough an online encyclopedia and I will try to find the link for you. DP

PS: Here is the link. I wouldn't take it for heart though...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Dental_Surgery
...and what two people (so far) have tried to tell you is that it isn't. Wikipedia is very useful, but isn't exactly the most authoritative source of information on the internet. The history given by SuperC is correct.
 

Dr. Dai Phan

Senior Member
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
155
aphistis said:
...and what two people (so far) have tried to tell you is that it isn't. Wikipedia is very useful, but isn't exactly the most authoritative source of information on the internet. The history given by SuperC is correct.

As I said before, I would NOT rely on that sourse (the Wikipedia) though because I do not know if it is true or someone just makes it up. I just thought to share that info with you. You need to read my statement in full and not taking things out of contex. DP
 

turtmd

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
49
Reaction score
0
Thank you for your information, it is very interesting :) Can you give us or give me information about your experience with the University of Florida...that's my top choice :love: like your interview, location, facilities, students..etc. Thanks
 
Top