DHEA, androstenedione, estrone, estradiol, what's the difference ...

str8flexed

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What are board-relevant differences between these things?
 

GAdoc

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What are board-relevant differences between these things?
quite a lot: androstenedione and DHEA are two different (but interconvertable) androgens produced in the adrenal cortex (I think the fasciculata and reticularis portions). To become an estrogen, aromatase has to be involved. Aromatase is present in granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle (I think) as well as peripherally in males and females.

It gets more complicated when considering the mother-fetal unit. The mother makes certain hormones which cross the placenta and are converted by the fetal adrenals into other end-products which are shipped back to the mother. You'll have to figure all that out. Most of that is too specific for Step 1, but the difference between androgens (DHEA, androstenedione) and estrogens (estriol, estradiol, estrone, etc) is important
 
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str8flexed

str8flexed

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Can someone tell me specific differences between DHEA, testosterone, and androstenedione?

Or estrone, estridiol, estrogen, estriol?

Supposedly Estrone is the major estrogen in post-menopausal women...why?

I know there's potency differences...

Wikipedia says: Estradiol (E2) is the predominate form in nonpregnant females, estrone is produced during menopause, and estriol is the primary estrogen of pregnancy. In the body these are all produced from androgens through actions of enzymes.

Has anybody seen any USMLE question that requires you to differentiate them?
 

McGillGrad

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All you need to do is memorize the steroid pathway. Then just understand what happens if any enzyme is deficient and you can answer any question. It's that simple.
 

lildave2586

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Can someone tell me specific differences between DHEA, testosterone, and androstenedione?

Or estrone, estridiol, estrogen, estriol?

Supposedly Estrone is the major estrogen in post-menopausal women...why?

I know there's potency differences...

Wikipedia says: Estradiol (E2) is the predominate form in nonpregnant females, estrone is produced during menopause, and estriol is the primary estrogen of pregnancy. In the body these are all produced from androgens through actions of enzymes.
Goljan RR agrees with what wikipedia says. Estrone is the major post-menopausal estrogen because it is manufactored in the adrenal gland. When the ovaries shut down, you lose the estradiol.

I think it's probably good to know DHEA and androstenedione as 17 keto steroids, as that is what they can be referred to as in question stems.
 

McGillGrad

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Goljan RR agrees with what wikipedia says. Estrone is the major post-menopausal estrogen because it is manufactored in the adrenal gland. When the ovaries shut down, you lose the estradiol.

I think it's probably good to know DHEA and androstenedione as 17 keto steroids, as that is what they can be referred to as in question stems.
well...technically...

all of these are 17 keto steroids:

Estrone
Androstenedione
Androsterone
Dehydroepiandrosterone