Sep 20, 2015
4
1
Status
Pre-Medical
I think I screwed up the chance I had of ever becoming a Doctor. Let me explain:

All through HighSchool, my grades suffered due to a variety of factors. Mainly through abuse, injures, depression, and sheer lack of confidence. I'd constantly talk myself down when doing the most simple of tasks. Thinking things like "Am I too stupid to do this? I know I'll fail, why even try?" My highSchool transcript was a 2.4 my junior year.

Eventually, I went to my doctor and he of course gave me Anti-Depressants, but he also gave me a talk. To sum it up, He said that you thinking you are stupid and not trying in School is YOUR FAULT. Your grades suffering is entirely YOUR FAULT. This hit me, hard.

I thought, if I wanted to achieve my goal, I'd have to try to get over my depression, ignore the verbal abuse I was getting, and just change my outlook on life. That's when I devised a plan for myself. My plan was to:

- Get a GED
- Enroll in Community College and get a 4.0
- Volunteer at the Hospital
- Join a club and get a leadership position
- Transfer into a Yale (I know the rates)
- Score High on MCAT
- Med School
- Match into the field of my choice
- Become Doctor

Unfortunately, this didn't go as well as I had hoped. I got my GED in a week instead of going through Senior Year at my highschool. Since I would be going to Community College anyway, I figured why not do it a year earlier? I wasn't able to enroll in Community College this semester due to me being one WEEK late while trying to get my GED. So this has screwed my entire plan up.

I got a job as a Dishwasher/Busboy at my local Sizzlers working with people who don't want to go anywhere in life. I feel like I'm stuck.

I could really use some advice on how to go forward from here.
 

typhoonegator

Neurointensivist
Moderator
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2006
1,868
865
Boston
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I was not aware Sizzler was still in business. But moving on, it sounds like you're still ahead of the game in terms of your overall time plan, right? Why should this screw up your goals? Take a semester off and take whatever courses you can ad hoc, enroll in CC next semester, and resume your plan. Am I missing something?

You have an uphill battle, but your life will declare itself regardless. And chasing a dream is way, way better than the alternative. Best of luck, and don't chase names like Yale. There are many ways to get where you want to go.
 

Person1345

2+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2015
193
249
Status
Medical Student
You haven't messed up anything. You're at the very beginning and you are going to be just fine, grade-wise and school-wise, as long as you get the help you need and move forward little by little each day. Now that your high-school/GED history has been written, forget about it. When you get to college, you will realize that most people take a zig-zagged path in life. Nothing ever works out in a straight line. (As an aside, it's a bit odd that your doctor was so harsh with you. He should have chosen his words more carefully.)

Here's my advice:

1) Throughout every subsequent step, always seek help for your mental-health needs through counselors and your doctors. You can't do anything else unless you take care of yourself. In fact, when you make it to college—and a 4-year university, especially, you will have more mental health resources than you ever had (or probably ever will have again) in your life. Take advantage!

2). Do well at your current job. Put as much money away as you can. Check to see if your employer provides any scholarships for employees like you (at your local community college, etc. Starbucks pays for online college at Arizona State University, for example). Many employers do this nowadays, though maybe not the Sizzler.

3) If you can, get a second job. Obviously don't work yourself to death, but since you're not taking classes this semester, try to make some extra money.

4) Go visit your local community college NOW. Set up an appointment with a counselor—demand to speak with one in person, and make an appointment to do so. When you meet, ask for printouts that outline every academic and administrative deadline (when enrollment for classes begins, when tuition is due, drop dates etc.). You are planning for next semester (spring 2016). Unbelievably, it's only a few months away and this time is going to fly by quickly.

5) During your counseling appointment, figure out exactly what classes the college offers for an associates degree in biology or something similar. Figure out exactly what it takes to enroll in those classes, and don't leave until you do.

6) Go to your state college (the 4-year university) or call and ask to arrange an appointment with an enrollment counselor. This is the person who can tell you how you're going to organize your college career. Ask how your coursework will transfer from the community college to the state college. Show the counselor the classes provided to you from your community college. Check with this person that the credits will transfer, or at least provide you some sort of advanced standing such that you can enroll in the appropriate classes at the state college (when you eventually transfer). This is very important—PLAN AHEAD. In fact, these next few months you spend working will help give you some time to plan. One of your biggest hurdles will be transferring your work at community college to the 4-year college, but if you ask in advance, this arrangement will greatly work in your favor. You will save money and you'll be prepared for more difficult coursework.

Make sure you tell the advisor at the 4-year college that you want to go to medical school. Tell him/her what you want to major in, and get a "major sheet" (provided in print or online at every university) that explains what classes you must take in order to graduate in the major. Ask how your community college coursework fits into this major sheet. Your end goal should be to get a 4-year degree in biology or chemistry from a 4-year college. Preferably, the large public university in your state. You do NOT have to go to Yale in order to go to medical school. But if you want, still apply to Yale. But make sure you apply to other schools, as well. I truly believe that the best course to get to medical school is to get a degree from your state university. If you can, go to the major public university in your state. These schools have extraordinary reputations and resources.

You now know what your goals—your classes—are at community college.

7) The day registration opens for classes at the community college, register (it will be sooner than you think! Probably mid-fall).

8) If you can manage it, it sounds like you need to remove yourself from your living situation. While you're working and in community college, maybe you can muster enough money to move out into your own apartment. If not, work your butt off, stay in the library, and don't return home until midnight after studying. Then leave early the next morning.

9) Are you from an underrepresented minority or ethnic group? Apply for scholarships for community college from sponsoring organizations. If you're Native American, for example, see what types of resources your tribe offers. I promise, there is a lot of money out there, but have to find it. You can likely get a significant portion of CC paid for.

10) Next semester (spring 2016), take the recommended courses that will advance you in the direction of your two-year associate's degree. You'll likely do well in them, given that you seem motivated. Don't forget that this is just a primer for your courses at the 4-year college, which will be much more difficult. Keep working hard at your job—see if you can get a better job, or get promoted. Don't forget that working at Sizzler counts. Moving from busboy to waiter to manager demonstrates persistence and leadership. Just FYI—every medical school application asks for employment during college. So what you're doing is not a waste of your time. Obviously it's not good if work takes away from your studies, but you're in a tight place right now.

11) As stated before, you do NOT need to go to an elite school. In fact, I view a large, public university as the best option for getting to medical school. Your goal should be to do great in your classes there (you do not need a 4.0, though a GPA as high as possible doesn't hurt). It's better to be an exceptional student coming from State U than it is to be last in your class at an "elite" university. By the way, state universities are elite. They have phenomenal resources, often have larger labs, etc. You will have many opportunities. Your goal should be to be an active member of the university community. If you do well in your biology class, for example, you may be asked to be a TA for the class. One step will lead to another. One position will lead to another. Consider, too, that you could go to Yale Medical School. Or Yale for residency. Or Yale's hospital, when you're a full-fledged physician.

12) Make sure to take all your core science classes at the 4-year university—biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and the required labs. Also make sure you take a year's worth of English classes.

13) You might be overwhelmed by the large class sized at your 4-year college. It's okay—hang in there. If you don't get As, it's okay. In fact, these can be the most difficult classes because they may attempt to "weed out people." Be persistent—many will change majors and drop out.

14) Get an on-campus job. You may get paid better because of the arrangement with the university (since they employ the students). You also will have more flexibility since you're a student. Lastly, your job will be on campus so it will be more convenient.

15) Don't be stupid. This goes for anyone. Stay away from the people doing drugs or who get drunk often. They wake up on Sundays at 2:30 in the afternoon and then can't study. You also risk getting arrested for being in the wrong place at the wrong time for public intoxication, noise complaints, urinating in public, and the list goes on. I can't tell you how many people I know who have been arrested like this. It could hurt your future applications. You want to be able to check the box that states, "I have never been arrested nor do I have pending charges against me." Have fun but be measured—never live on the extremes. Don't ever sit in your apartment alone for days at a time, and conversely, don't go on a 3-day party binge. Live life moderately.

16) Don't ever cheat. This includes copying homework or problem sets. There will be times when everyone else around you is taking shortcuts. Don't do it. I thoroughly believe that everything works out in the end, even if you fail a test (I have, and so will many other people at one time or another), for example. Again, you want to be able to check the box on your medical school application that states, "I have never been charged with academic misconduct." Also beware of what constitutes cheating—having a friend calling you as "present" in a lecture—when you are not there— is cheating. Don't get caught when others say, "it's no big deal." You'll be the professor's example. Don't ever put yourself in that position.

17) Once you've situated yourself at the 4-year college, make an appointment to speak with the pre-medical advisor at the university. Similar to your previous academic counseling meeting, you want to make sure you know what the expectations are for getting into medical school. If they tell you it's too early in your academic career, don't accept that answer. Meet with them. This office will have numerous brochures and handouts. Likely, there will be sheets for each medical school (geographically nearby, at least) that explain what the exact requirements are for admission. In fact, if you're interested in your state medical school (You should be!! You have a great chance of getting in if you do well as an undergrad), you should ask the pre-med advisor when a medical school representative visits campus (they do so!). Meet with those people. Ask what their requirements are. On one extreme, they may have exacting requirements. The University of Utah Medical School, for example, requires 7 categories of experiences. They outline what is "average" and what the minimum standards are. It may seem daunting, but this is actually great because you know what your targets are.

18) Start volunteering now...it can just be an hour. The key is to make a consistent contribution over a long period time. Volunteer regularly. Say, every Saturday morning make it a habit to serve food at the soup kitchen. Although community service fulfills your medical school requirements, it's also healthy for you to get out, see people, and feel good about the contributions you make to your community.

19) Start trying to obtain clinical medical experience. This may be difficult to do at this time, but see what is available at your local hospital, nursing home, etc. You may actually even be paid for some of this work, which does double duty (fulfilling clinical requirements and helping you financially).

20) Don't forget about your other interests. Did you play the trombone in high school? Join the CC band. Then join the university band. Did you enjoy writing? Write for your school paper. Don't forget that there is no cookie cutter profile for being successful and getting into medical school. You have to lead a balanced life.

21) Always get to know your professors. This helps with everything—getting hired to work/volunteer in their labs or doing well in their courses.

22) Cold-contact a lot of people. Want to shadow the thoracic surgeon at the hospital? Send him/her an email. Need to shadow the local internist? Call and ask. They may say no, but you will find that many will instead say yes. Especially if you are a university student and your university is affiliated with the hospital.

This is all just a start, but remember you are not stuck. This is a great place to be stuck at—the very beginning. Waiting several months to take classes may seem like a lifetime at this point, but it's not. I know many, many previous classmates whose academic histories are a patchwork of transcripts from different universities, classwork taken over many years, etc. The key is that they did the absolute best they could with the resources available to them at the time, whether that was working at a fast food restaurant or studying at community college. You got this. Good luck!
 
Last edited:
OP
Xelnath
Sep 20, 2015
4
1
Status
Pre-Medical
You haven't messed up anything. You're at the very beginning and you are going to be just fine, grade-wise and school-wise, as long as you get the help you need and move forward little by little each day. Now that your high-school/GED history has been written, forget about it. When you get to college, you will realize that most people take a zig-zagged path in life. Nothing ever works out in a straight line. (As an aside, it's a bit odd that your doctor was so harsh with you. He should have chosen his words more carefully.)

Here's my advice:

1) Throughout every subsequent step, always seek help for your mental-health needs through counselors and your doctors. You can't do anything else unless you take care of yourself. In fact, when you make it to college—and a 4-year university, especially, you will have more mental health resources than you ever had (or probably ever will have again) in your life. Take advantage!

2). Do well at your current job. Put as much money away as you can. Check to see if your employer provides any scholarships for employees like you (at your local community college, etc. Starbucks pays for online college at Arizona State University, for example). Many employers do this nowadays, though maybe not the Sizzler.

3) If you can, get a second job. Obviously don't work yourself to death, but since you're not taking classes this semester, try to make some extra money.

4) Go visit your local community college NOW. Set up an appointment with a counselor—demand to speak with one in person, and make an appointment to do so. When you meet, ask for printouts that outline every academic and administrative deadline (when enrollment for classes begins, when tuition is due, drop dates etc.). You are planning for next semester (spring 2016). Unbelievably, it's only a few months away and this time is going to fly by quickly.

5) During your counseling appointment, figure out exactly what classes the college offers for an associates degree in biology or something similar. Figure out exactly what it takes to enroll in those classes, and don't leave until you do.

6) Go to your state college (the 4-year university) or call and ask to arrange an appointment with an enrollment counselor. This is the person who can tell you how you're going to organize your college career. Ask how your coursework will transfer from the community college to the state college. Show the counselor the classes provided to you from your community college. Check with this person that the credits will transfer, or at least provide you some sort of advanced standing such that you can enroll in the appropriate classes at the state college (when you eventually transfer). This is very important—PLAN AHEAD. In fact, these next few months you spend working will help give you some time to plan. One of your biggest hurdles will be transferring your work at community college to the 4-year college, but if you ask in advance, this arrangement will greatly work in your favor. You will save money and you'll be prepared for more difficult coursework.

Make sure you tell the advisor at the 4-year college that you want to go to medical school. Tell him/her what you want to major in, and get a "major sheet" (provided in print or online at every university) that explains what classes you must take in order to graduate in the major. Ask how your community college coursework fits into this major sheet. Your end goal should be to get a 4-year degree in biology or chemistry from a 4-year college. Preferably, the large public university in your state. You do NOT have to go to Yale in order to go to medical school. But if you want, still apply to Yale. But make sure you apply to other schools, as well. I truly believe that the best course to get to medical school is to get a degree from your state university. If you can, go to the major public university in your state. These schools have extraordinary reputations and resources.

You now know what your goals—your classes—are at community college.

7) The day registration opens for classes at the community college, register (it will be sooner than you think! Probably mid-fall).

8) If you can manage it, it sounds like you need to remove yourself from your living situation. While you're working and in community college, maybe you can muster enough money to move out into your own apartment. If not, work your butt off, stay in the library, and don't return home until midnight after studying. Then leave early the next morning.

9) Are you from an underrepresented minority or ethnic group? Apply for scholarships for community college from sponsoring organizations. If you're Native American, for example, see what types of resources your tribe offers. I promise, there is a lot of money out there, but have to find it. You can likely get a significant portion of CC paid for.

10) Next semester (spring 2016), take the recommended courses that will advance you in the direction of your two-year associate's degree. You'll likely do well in them, given that you seem motivated. Don't forget that this is just a primer for your courses at the 4-year college, which will be much more difficult. Keep working hard at your job—see if you can get a better job, or get promoted. Don't forget that working at Sizzler counts. Moving from busboy to waiter to manager demonstrates persistence and leadership. Just FYI—every medical school application asks for employment during college. So what you're doing is not a waste of your time. Obviously it's not good if work takes away from your studies, but you're in a tight place right now.

11) As stated before, you do NOT need to go to an elite school. In fact, I view a large, public university as the best option for getting to medical school. Your goal should be to do great in your classes there (you do not need a 4.0, though a GPA as high as possible doesn't hurt). It's better to be an exceptional student coming from State U than it is to be last in your class at an "elite" university. By the way, state universities are elite. They have phenomenal resources, often have larger labs, etc. You will have many opportunities. Your goal should be to be an active member of the university community. If you do well in your biology class, for example, you may be asked to be a TA for the class. One step will lead to another. One position will lead to another. Consider, too, that you could go to Yale Medical School. Or Yale for residency. Or Yale's hospital, when you're a full-fledged physician.

12) Make sure to take all your core science classes at the 4-year university—biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and the required labs. Also make sure you take a year's worth of English classes.

13) You might be overwhelmed by the large class sized at your 4-year college. It's okay—hang in there. If you don't get As, it's okay. In fact, these can be the most difficult classes because they may attempt to "weed out people." Be persistent—many will change majors and drop out.

14) Get an on-campus job. You may get paid better because of the arrangement with the university (since they employ the students). You also will have more flexibility since you're a student. Lastly, your job will be on campus so it will be more convenient.

15) Don't be stupid. This goes for anyone. Stay away from the people doing drugs or who get drunk often. They wake up on Sundays at 2:30 in the afternoon and then can't study. You also risk getting arrested for being in the wrong place at the wrong time for public intoxication, noise complaints, urinating in public, and the list goes on. I can't tell you how many people I know who have been arrested like this. It could hurt your future applications. You want to be able to check the box that states, "I have never been arrested nor do I have pending charges against me." Have fun but be measured—never live on the extremes. Don't ever sit in your apartment alone for days at a time, and conversely, don't go on a 3-day party binge. Live life moderately.

16) Don't ever cheat. This includes copying homework or problem sets. There will be times when everyone else around you is taking shortcuts. Don't do it. I thoroughly believe that everything works out in the end, even if you fail a test (I have, and so will many other people at one time or another), for example. Again, you want to be able to check the box on your medical school application that states, "I have never been charged with academic misconduct." Also beware of what constitutes cheating—having a friend calling you as "present" in a lecture—when you are not there— is cheating. Don't get caught when others say, "it's no big deal." You'll be the professor's example. Don't ever put yourself in that position.

17) Once you've situated yourself at the 4-year college, make an appointment to speak with the pre-medical advisor at the university. Similar to your previous academic counseling meeting, you want to make sure you know what the expectations are for getting into medical school. If they tell you it's too early in your academic career, don't accept that answer. Meet with them. This office will have numerous brochures and handouts. Likely, there will be sheets for each medical school (geographically nearby, at least) that explain what the exact requirements are for admission. In fact, if you're interested in your state medical school (You should be!! You have a great chance of getting in if you do well as an undergrad), you should ask the pre-med advisor when a medical school representative visits campus (they do so!). Meet with those people. Ask what their requirements are. On one extreme, they may have exacting requirements. The University of Utah Medical School, for example, requires 7 categories of experiences. They outline what is "average" and what the minimum standards are. It may seem daunting, but this is actually great because you know what your targets are.

18) Start volunteering now...it can just be an hour. The key is to make a consistent contribution over a long period time. Volunteer regularly. Say, every Saturday morning make it a habit to serve food at the soup kitchen. Although community service fulfills your medical school requirements, it's also healthy for you to get out, see people, and feel good about the contributions you make to your community.

19) Start trying to obtain clinical medical experience. This may be difficult to do at this time, but see what is available at your local hospital, nursing home, etc. You may actually even be paid for some of this work, which does double duty (fulfilling clinical requirements and helping you financially).

20) Don't forget about your other interests. Did you play the trombone in high school? Join the CC band. Then join the university band. Did you enjoy writing? Write for your school paper. Don't forget that there is no cookie cutter profile for being successful and getting into medical school. You have to lead a balanced life.

21) Always get to know your professors. This helps with everything—getting hired to work/volunteer in their labs or doing well in their courses.

22) Cold-contact a lot of people. Want to shadow the thoracic surgeon at the hospital? Send him/her an email. Need to shadow the local internist? Call and ask. They may say no, but you will find that many will instead say yes. Especially if you are a university student and your university is affiliated with the hospital.

This is all just a start, but remember you are not stuck. This is a great place to be stuck at—the very beginning. Waiting several months to take classes may seem like a lifetime at this point, but it's not. I know many, many previous classmates whose academic histories are a patchwork of transcripts from different universities, classwork taken over many years, etc. The key is that they did the absolute best they could with the resources available to them at the time, whether that was working at a fast food restaurant or studying at community college. You got this. Good luck!
Thanks for the advice! I will use your post as a sort of guideline. I JUST got back from work feeling down, as usual. But after I read the previous posts, they really motivated me. Especially yours!

Now I know my life really isn't screwed up. I CAN do this. I will be sure to get help on my mental issues. That, and issues at home seem to be the biggest obstacles right now.
 
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Crayola227

The Oncoming Storm
5+ Year Member
Oct 22, 2013
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Get with the community college ASAP. Do your FAFSA asap, and don't forget to redo it as soon as the Jan 1 2016 date rolls around.

When you look at the community college, figure out if you need to be earning less money. Too many people I know work full time out of high school and find that then they need to foot an entire semester out of pocket, can't even get loans, for even up until a whole year, because they always go off the last year and your parents and your income for calculating aid.

The only time poverty and not being the working poor pays off is in student aid for college.

If you haven't made too much already this year, even doing online courses from a different institution with aid and student loans is better, because student loans and aid never count as income for qualifying for aid and loans.

Working and saving up money is great as long as it doesn't bite you in the ass for getting your foot in the door as a student.

And seriously, forget about Yale. Names like that usually aren't worth the money. It doesn't sound like you have the kind of ego for politics or business to need that kind of pedigree if you just want to be a doctor.

Don't worry too much about being a doctor for the noment. Get your finances and life adjusted so you can stary classes, get good grades, and live. You'll sort more out as you take classes.

Start your first term with some easy gen ed requirements so you can learn the lay of the land.
 
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Crayola227

The Oncoming Storm
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Nothing is ruined, you just got to lay the groundwork to get yourself onto campus and get good grades to start.

I didn't start until Winter term for various reasons, and my first two terms were gen ed stuff since a year long sequence wasn't in the cards. I did it to get aid number one, and number two made sure the credits counted for *something* at the uni level, got the best grades I could, took a few easy low level ones, the fewest number of credits while still full time (so I had more money left over from disbursement). This let me get into the groove, get advising established, learn the campus and services and departments, develop college study habits, get hooked into work study, extracurricular stuff and clubs, tutoring and library services, friends, parking, car, housing, all the little things that let me add more and more to the plate knowing what I was doing.

I did most of my credits at community college.

You're totally fine, just get to campus and baby steps first.

Work on your mental, physical, spiritual health, self esteem.

Look up self esteem anonymous online to start maybe.
You mentioned abuse. Consider Adult Children of Alcoholics/Dysfunctional Families organization. Google online to find out more.

Sorting how how your upbringing has effected you, learning coping skills, will be essential.
 

BigRedBeta

Why am I in a handbasket?
10+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2007
1,426
821
Status
Attending Physician
As everyone else has said, nothing is ruined. In a sense, you're still ahead of the game as you would be going to homecoming dances and HS football games this year anyways.

Other than your mental health issues, the biggest challenge ahead of you is avoiding academic inertia. Huge numbers of people enter community college expecting to finish in 2 years, transfer and graduate with a bachelor's in 4 years. The stats say many don't make that jump and compared to those that enter a 4 year university from the start are far less likely to graduate with a bachelor's in any length of time. It makes sense, many more people at community colleges are working while in school, money is a great motivator and when thinking about spending hours studying versus picking up extra shifts, extra money in your bank account is an easy choice...and then you get a C- on the exam.

But in the immortal words of Donnie in the Big Lebowski "nothing is f***** here, Dude"
 

moisne

5+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2014
1,486
897
Nope, you seem pretty on track lol.

Nothing counts until you start undergrad (traditional or community college). Doesn't matter if you failed ALL of your HS classes, ditched, got referrals, kicked out/suspended/expelled. Doesn't matter if you spend several years in the service industry. Nothing matters.

Just get into CC next semester and get 4.0's, transfer to 4year college, get 4.0's... then do some EC and ace the MCAT and boom, you'll be a doctor. :D
 
Sep 3, 2015
216
246
Outer Gates
Status
Pre-Medical
I can't add much to this thread, you've been given really good advice.

I do want to encourage you, though.

I also have a GED and it was something I was embarrassed about before. I had some academic struggles and a speech issue, etc...and I struggled with the idea of worthiness etc myself.

I went to a CC for a year then transferred to a private uni then a state uni.

The only thing I would change is staying in CC longer, then going to state, and saving some money. Well, and seeking the help I should have sought much earlier-getting a handle on depression etc with counseling and such earlier would have helped, I think I would have been more motivated/successful.

Even so I got into a competitive graduate program and am working now as a therapist, and doing post bacc work. So you CAN be successful, even delayed.

So that's my advice to you- save money, take it easy, get counseling.
 
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Icositetrachoron

BS/MD
2+ Year Member
Oct 3, 2015
21
3
Since your objective is to go to med-school, why not try to get a med-related job? Now that you have a GED, you can qualify to be a registered Pharmacy Technician, Medical Scribe, etc. Even if you can't do that, you can do insurance billing or something along those lines. Try to diversify your ECs now, while you have free time - it'll cover for you when any interviewer asks you about this "gap" year. You want to turn this mistake into something that you've gained significantly from, so instead of saying, "Uhhh, I messed up and couldn't get into CC," the response will be something more on the lines of, "I decided that taking a gap year would be highly beneficial to the cultivation of my mindset. The ECs that I took helped me do ... , and I ultimately gained ..." This is the type of confidence that people like seeing in an interview, and it connotes a higher degree of sophistication to your person. You haven't screwed up - not yet. Just stay determined and pull through.

As an aside:

In the words of Shia LeBeouf,

"Don't let your dreams be dreams!"
"JUST DO IT!"

:soexcited:
 
Sep 3, 2015
216
246
Outer Gates
Status
Pre-Medical
Oh, I forgot! Many community colleges had scholarships for people who have completed a GED, and otherwise have no college credit.

I had one, paid tuition and even books. I was an idiot and decided to go away to school (the "experience" is a bit over-rated in retrospect).

Don't be me.

Look at the CCs available scholarships, I bet they have one.
 
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Crayola227

The Oncoming Storm
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Oct 22, 2013
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Agreed. Big name schools and moving away from home is sexier on TV. You'll likely do that for med school anyway.
 
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