GypsyHummus

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Hey everyone,

I know I will probably get berated by asking this, but here it goes. GPA: 3.4, 3.2 cumulative and science respectively.

I graduated in 2014 and studied for the MCAT. Just got back scores last week and scored a 490, about a 20 on the old test. Obviously, this is a horrible score. My main goal was DO school, but that seems out of reach now and have since started to form a backup plan. Podiatry seems like a very tempting offer, nicer hours than other surgical specialties, emphasis on biomechanics (which is what drew me to DO school in the first place), options on surgery vs non surgical approaches to medicine, etc. Most importantly, I could get into it at this moment in time.

I guess what I am asking is for those people who's first choice was not podiatry, are you glad that you settled on it in the end? I have contacted a couple of pod schools, and they said that my MCAT was fine if I applied now.

To all people actually in the profession or in school, do you regret your decision at all? 7 years is a long time to study something that your heart is not into, and I do have a bit of trepidation about entering pod school as of now. Not for the perceived lack of "prestige" however, I hold the podiatry profession in a high regard. My cousin entered the profession as a backup, but it ended up working out for her-now she is a successful doc making 110K. Seems like a good backup to me.

Thank you all for your time.
 

heybrother

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If you want to be a DO then retake the MCAT. You've suffered one adversity. Overcome it.

I think you need to further explore podiatry to better understand it. Here's what I know now - Podiatry training is wildly disparate. I'm on my 5th program and 2/5 are terrible. This isn't something to fall/coast into.
 
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GypsyHummus

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OP what were your practice test scores and your AAMC FL score? If they were at least in the ~500 range, perhaps it was just test anxiety that affected your score. If that's the case, i'd re-take the MCAT and evaluate your options afterwards.
No, I used Kaplan, and my scores were in the 184 range.
 
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GypsyHummus

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OP what were your practice test scores and your AAMC FL score? If they were at least in the ~500 range, perhaps it was just test anxiety that affected your score. If that's the case, i'd re-take the MCAT and evaluate your options afterwards.
Thats why I'm like shoot man, Im bombing this MCAT, so 490 is good for me lol.

I meet the cutoff at a couple places for DO schools.
 

heybrother

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Are you just taking practice tests to assess your score or are you working through the testing materials and then exploring the explanations to understand how the questions were crafted?
 
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GypsyHummus

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Are you just taking practice tests to assess your score or are you working through the testing materials and then exploring the explanations to understand how the questions were crafted?
Just working through practice tests.
 

bobtheweazel

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If you want to be a DO then retake the MCAT. You've suffered one adversity. Overcome it.

I think you need to further explore podiatry to better understand it. Here's what I know now - Podiatry training is wildly disparate. I'm on my 5th program and 2/5 are terrible. This isn't something to fall/coast into.
If you don't mind me asking, what do you mean you're on your 5th program, and which 2/5 were terrible?
 
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ldsrmdude

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I was wondering that too. Maybe 5th rotation site?
That would be my assumption. Although residencies are have the same minimum requirements, the training you receive at different programs still can vary a great deal.
 
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I know people in the Pharmacy program who don't care much about pharmacy but still march through b/c they want the 100k salary & I also knew people who went to pod school not caring much about the paycheck but withdrew b/c they weren't passionate enough about podiatry to dedicate 7 years of their lives training to become a podiatrists.
 
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lalex

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I really find these posts insulting.

If you want to be a MD/DO dont go into podiatry. A large portion of people who left my class when I was a student did so because deep down they wanted to be a MD/DO.
Why do you find it insulting? It's like choosing your specialty before beginning medical school. Many people go into med school hoping to match derm/ortho. But they settle on an easier one. Is it really insulting that someone who wanted to be a surgeon is a family doctor?
 
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bobtheweazel

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Why do you find it insulting? It's like choosing your specialty before beginning medical school. Many people go into med school hoping to match derm/ortho. But they settle on an easier one. Is it really insulting that someone who wanted to be a surgeon is a family doctor?
The point is that that's not your reason for being here. Your sole reason for being here is that your grades aren't good enough for MD/DO. You can say that you like Ortho and derm, but the fact is that if your grades/MCAT were higher you wouldn't be here talking to us now.
 
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GypsyHummus

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I really find these posts insulting.

If you want to be a MD/DO dont go into podiatry. A large portion of people who left my class when I was a student did so because deep down they wanted to be a MD/DO.
And I bet there were people who made it through with it as a backup as well. Just like DO is MD backup

Podiatry is known to be a backup.
 

bobtheweazel

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And I bet there were people who made it through with it as a backup as well. Just like DO is MD backup

Podiatry is known to be a backup.
For some people it is a backup, for many it is not. There is a lot of draw towards podiatry other than being a backup for MD/DO. Many people have had their own foot/ankle problems or have had family members that did. Others have a history working with this patient population. If you have a genuine interest in podiatry, then you'll probably get through. If you genuinely just want to be an MD/DO and podiatry is just your backup route, at some point along the way you're gonna say, why am I clipping toenails and shaving calluses EVERY DAMN DAY... #PodLife

P.S., I've also seen many people rejected so far this cycle with stats higher than yours. Temple informed us that there have been more applicants at this time in the cycle this year than there have been in decades. That means the schools are gonna have a better applicant pool to choose from. You should probably retake the MCAT or it'll be the #ChiroLife for you...
 
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lalex

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The point is that that's not your reason for being here. Your sole reason for being here is that your grades aren't good enough for MD/DO. You can say that you like Ortho and derm, but the fact is that if your grades/MCAT were higher you wouldn't be here talking to us now.
Yeah and your family doctor might not be a family doctor if he did better in med school. I'm here based out of pure curiosity, I don't even get why the two are separated in the first place.
 

bobtheweazel

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Yeah and your family doctor might not be a family doctor if he did better in med school. I'm here based out of pure curiosity, I don't even get why the two are separated in the first place.
They're separated because they were always separated. The precursor to modern podiatrists were foot care specialists with great variance in education and little oversight, but in all fairness it was the late 1800s. And to put this in perspective, this was pre-"Flaxner Report" and the education of MDs was a highly variant two year degree and included a lot of alternative (a.k.a., made up) medicine and quackery. The two fields and degrees, MD and DPM, have since both gotten their **** together, all the while maturing and evolving independently of each other. The fact that there are so many similarities in their practice today is because they both follow basic scientific principles and evidence based medicine.
 
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GypsyHummus

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For some people it is a backup, for many it is not. There is a lot of draw towards podiatry other than being a backup for MD/DO. Many people have had their own foot/ankle problems or have had family members that did. Others have a history working with this patient population. If you have a genuine interest in podiatry, then you'll probably get through. If you genuinely just want to be an MD/DO and podiatry is just your backup route, at some point along the way you're gonna say, why am I clipping toenails and shaving calluses EVERY DAMN DAY... #PodLife

P.S., I've also seen many people rejected so far this cycle with stats higher than yours. Temple informed us that there have been more applicants at this time in the cycle this year than there have been in decades. That means the schools are gonna have a better applicant pool to choose from. You should probably retake the MCAT or it'll be the #ChiroLife for you...
The reason schools are probably being more selective is because they are getting students who were rejected from DO schools #Burn

Speaking of burn, I have little respect for people who openly endorse Bernie Sanders, especially those in medicine. I automatically assume that any advice that you give is worthless. Hate to be blunt, but you have no idea how the world works.
 

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The reason schools are probably being more selective is because they are getting students who were rejected from DO schools #Burn

Speaking of burn, I have little respect for people who openly endorse Bernie Sanders, especially those in medicine. I automatically assume that any advice that you give is worthless. Hate to be blunt, but you have no idea how the world works.
Let's keep the thread on-topic here. If you all want to have a political thread, feel free to start one here.

Oh, and flaming or insults on either side of this (the topic of the thread) discussion won't be looked on too kindly. If you find you just can't tolerate someone, please use the ignore function
 
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Dreamstoo

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I really find these posts insulting.

If you want to be a MD/DO dont go into podiatry. A large portion of people who left my class when I was a student did so because deep down they wanted to be a MD/DO.
I have heard this from an aspiring pre med. They couldn't get in after the first two cycles and went podiatry. I've been told yes it's a backup and some of the students eventually find themselves to be happy in "podiatry" but my friend who was a first year podiatry student felt miserable despite doing fairly well. This does happen sadly.

It is definitely a solid backup career but my friend who was this aspiring pre med student prior to going to podiatry school said he's completely unsure after his first year if he wants to finish it or try once again at the MCAT and go to DO/MD. I believe he had a 23 or 24 MCAT score as a URM but in previous cycles, he was told he needed a 25-26 but after 2-3 attempts of 24,23,23 he was never able to achieve it. Last time I saw him, he was toying with the idea of retaking the new MCAT during his time off this past summer. Also sorry to let you know OP, that 490 would be a 19 on the old scale not a 20.

I've also heard matching into residencies in podiatry has become hard over the years. Not entirely sure how true it is but I read about it sometime last year.
 
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bobtheweazel

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According to the Dean at AZPod, there was a shortage for a few years. There is now a surplus of residencies, but the system is still trying to play catch up for the students from a few years ago who couldn't match. He said that by the time we get out, 2020, there should be a 10% surplus of residency programs and that virtually all of those students who got left behind before will be worked through the system (unless they have a poor personality or completely awful grades and can never be matched). At this point, residencies should be a non issue as far as considering Podiatry goes.
 
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Dreamstoo

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According to the Dean at AZPod, there was a shortage for a few years. There is now a surplus of residencies, but the system is still trying to play catch up for the students from a few years ago who couldn't match. He said that by the time we get out, 2020, there should be a 10% surplus of residency programs and that virtually all of those students who got left behind before will be worked through the system (unless they have a poor personality or completely awful grades and can never be matched). At this point, residencies should be a non issue as far as considering Podiatry goes.
Thank you for bringing that up for OP and other interested pre-podiatry students. I did not know this.
 

bobtheweazel

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The reason schools are probably being more selective is because they are getting students who were rejected from DO schools #Burn

Speaking of burn, I have little respect for people who openly endorse Bernie Sanders, especially those in medicine. I automatically assume that any advice that you give is worthless. Hate to be blunt, but you have no idea how the world works.
I assume that's similar to how I have little respect for people who can only score a 20 on the MCAT, especially those in medicine.

On a serious note, scroll through the AACPMAS 2015-2016 Cycle thread, especially the later posts, and you'll see people being rejected and waitlisted left and right with stats similar to or higher than yours. Whether you wanna go Podiatry or anything else, you should consider retaking the MCAT for a higher score. If you are genuinely interested though, contact the admissions office for one or two of the schools you might be considering and ask them whether you would be competitive this cycle. From what us applicants have seen so far this cycle, it is more competitive than historical stats that are posted online.

As far as whether you can succeed in Podiatry, who knows. There is genuinely a lot of medicine and surgery involved and its a generally easier lifestyle on the other end than most specialties. You'll probably enjoy it more than anything you'll dislike about it, but Podiatric Medical School is still Medical School, so it won't be easy.
 
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Dreamstoo

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Generally speaking a lot of the "backups" out there aren't as easy as people claim it to be. I know of pre-meds who have contemplated switching over to pre-pharm, pre-dent, pre-podiatry, pre-optho to be shocked how difficult they are too. It's tricky for sure.

I would thoroughly research all other backups and shadow people in those fields if you are interested in it. I do know of someone who wasn't too passionate about pre med despite having a ~3.3/25 as a URM and decided to work in another healthcare field. This individual is really happy since he made that decision. He wasn't too far from being a competitive DO applicant but wasn't that passionate about medical school.

I know that podiatrists in New York could actually make around $150K based on stats, I believe the average is $140K but as the above posters have stated. The path of becoming one is not easy.

OP, if you're still passionate on being a doctor, I can't help but say don't give up yet. Retake the MCAT maybe.
 

Dreamstoo

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I assume that's similar to how I have little respect for people who can only score a 20 on the MCAT, especially those in medicine.

On a serious note, scroll through the AACPMAS 2015-2016 Cycle thread, especially the later posts, and you'll se people being rejected and waitlisted left and right with stats similar to or higher than yours. Whether you wanna go Podiatry or anything else, you should consider retaking the MCAT for a higher score. If you are genuinely interested though, contact the admissions office for one or two of the schools you might be considering and ask them whether you would be competitive this cycle. From what us applicants have seen so far this cycle, it is more competitive than historical stats that are posted online.

As far as whether you can succeed in Podiatry, who knows. There is genuinely a lot of medicine and surgery involved and its a generally easier lifestyle on the other end than most specialties. You'll probably enjoy it more than anything you'll dislike about it, but Podiatric Medical School is still Medical School, so it won't be easy.
Out of curiosity what type of cGPA/sGPA/MCAT would be a strong podiatry applicant?
 

bobtheweazel

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Historically...
Average MCAT: 23
Average cGPA: 3.33
Average sGPA: 3.18

Now, one very important thing to keep in mind for GPA calculations is that AACPMAS (Podiatric application service) does not have a forgiveness policy. If you failed a course (or simply did poorly) and then retook it, most undergraduate institutions would only count the retake course towards your GPA. AACPMAS would count both your failed attempt and your successful attempt towards your GPA. This is a shock to a lot of people who have their GPAs calculated by AACPMAS and get a significantly lower GPA than they would have had at their undergraduate institution. In comparison, the DO application process does have a grade forgiveness policy, which inflates their matriculating students GPAs. Because of this, the GPA gap between DO competitiveness and DPM competitiveness isn't as far as the numbers would have you believe at first glance. If someone is not competitive for DO schools, they will not be competitive for most, except the bottom tier, of podiatry schools.

Another thing to keep in mind is that this cycle is seeing so many more applicants than usual that what is considered competitive for this cycle will likely be above the historical average.

http://www.aacpm.org/html/careerzone/pdfs/2015 CIB.pdf
 
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GypsyHummus

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Historically...
Average MCAT: 23
Average cGPA: 3.33
Average sGPA: 3.18

Now, one very important thing to keep in mind for GPA calculations is that AACPMAS (Podiatric application service) does not have a forgiveness policy. If you failed a course (or simply did poorly) and then retook it, most undergraduate institutions would only count the retake course towards your GPA. AACPMAS would count both your failed attempt and your successful attempt towards your GPA. This is a shock to a lot of people who have their GPAs calculated by AACPMAS and get a significantly lower GPA than they would have had at their undergraduate institution. In comparison, the DO application process does have a grade forgiveness policy, which inflates their matriculating students GPAs. Because of this, the GPA gap between DO competitiveness and DPM competitiveness isn't as far as the numbers would have you believe at first glance. If someone is not competitive for DO schools, they will not be competitive for most, except the bottom tier, of podiatry schools.

Another thing to keep in mind is that this cycle is seeing so many more applicants than usual that what is considered competitive for this cycle will likely be above the historical average.

http://www.aacpm.org/html/careerzone/pdfs/2015 CIB.pdf
My cousin had a 3.2 and a 20 mcat around 7 or 8 years ago, and got in no problem. Is Pod school really that competitive now?
 

bobtheweazel

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My cousin had a 3.2 and a 20 mcat around 7 or 8 years ago, and got in no problem. Is Pod school really that competitive now?
It is more competitive, but that shouldn't necessarily keep anyone from applying, it's just something to keep in mind. Everyone has different ECs and a different background and all those things come in to play as well, it's not 100% GPA and MCAT, but it is mostly GPA and MCAT.

Probably the main difference between now and 7 or 8 years ago is that this year specifically there is a very large volume of applications coming in. One of the assistant deans at Temple said that more people have applied at this point in the cycle than have applied by this point in decades. Decades!!! However, the school's capacities are capped because they don't want something like the residency shortage of years past to happen again. The school's can't open up more seats to accommodate the higher number of applicants, so they necessarily are going to raise their standards.

Check this year's application thread, especially towards the end. I believe you'll see people with stats around what your cousin had or even higher getting rejections.
 
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GypsyHummus

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It is more competitive, but that shouldn't necessarily keep anyone from applying, it's just something to keep in mind. Everyone has different ECs and a different background and all those things come in to play as well, it's not 100% GPA and MCAT, but it is mostly GPA and MCAT.

Probably the main difference between now and 7 or 8 years ago is that this year specifically there is a very large volume of applications coming in. One of the assistant deans at Temple said that more people have applied at this point in the cycle than have applied by this point in decades. Decades!!! However, the school's capacities are capped because they don't want something like the residency shortage of years past to happen again. The school's can't open up more seats to accommodate the higher number of applicants, so they necessarily are going to raise their standards.

Check this year's application thread, especially towards the end. I believe you'll see people with stats around what your cousin had or even higher getting rejections.
Have they at least fixed the residency problem with podiatry? Thats one thing my cousin mentioned is that there were like 100 unmatched people in her graduating year.
 

Optimist Prime

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Thats why I'm like shoot man, Im bombing this MCAT, so 490 is good for me lol.

I meet the cutoff at a couple places for DO schools.
Just working through practice tests.
Ok you probably aren't going to like what I have to say but I don't think you should go into any medical related field at all. You want to be a DO yet you didn't even study for the mcat. (just doing practice tests over and over isn't studying) On top of this even after you were scoring poorly on the practice tests you decided to take the mcat anyway??? All this just shows poor decision making and inability to show effort. Which just shows how you don't really want to be a doctor that bad.
 
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bobtheweazel

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Have they at least fixed the residency problem with podiatry? Thats one thing my cousin mentioned is that there were like 100 unmatched people in her graduating year.
The residency problem shouldn't be a concern. There was a big shortage for a while but that's why enrolment is capped at a certain number for now. Also they've built up the residency spots to about a 10% surplus. Right know there are still some unmatched students because the system is still working through everyone who got screwed when there was a residency shortage. By the time we graduate they should all be worked through and there should be a 10% surplus of residency positions. Don't fret about a residency shortage.
 
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The residency problem shouldn't be a concern. There was a big shortage for a while but that's why enrolment is capped at a certain number for now. Also they've built up the residency spots to about a 10% surplus. Right know there are still some unmatched students because the system is still working through everyone who got screwed when there was a residency shortage. By the time we graduate they should all be worked through and there should be a 10% surplus of residency positions. Don't fret about a residency shortage.
Good. I still can't believe that unlatching was allowed to happen, but we will most likely be saying the same thing about MD/DO residencies in the very near future. At the rate they are opening up new schools, I suspect another 5 years and there will be a significant bottleneck for all but the lowest primary care spots.
 
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Hey everyone,

I know I will probably get berated by asking this, but here it goes. GPA: 3.4, 3.2 cumulative and science respectively.

I graduated in 2014 and studied for the MCAT. Just got back scores last week and scored a 490, about a 20 on the old test. Obviously, this is a horrible score. My main goal was DO school, but that seems out of reach now and have since started to form a backup plan. Podiatry seems like a very tempting offer, nicer hours than other surgical specialties, emphasis on biomechanics (which is what drew me to DO school in the first place), options on surgery vs non surgical approaches to medicine, etc. Most importantly, I could get into it at this moment in time.

I guess what I am asking is for those people who's first choice was not podiatry, are you glad that you settled on it in the end? I have contacted a couple of pod schools, and they said that my MCAT was fine if I applied now.

To all people actually in the profession or in school, do you regret your decision at all? 7 years is a long time to study something that your heart is not into, and I do have a bit of trepidation about entering pod school as of now. Not for the perceived lack of "prestige" however, I hold the podiatry profession in a high regard. My cousin entered the profession as a backup, but it ended up working out for her-now she is a successful doc making 110K. Seems like a good backup to me.

Thank you all for your time.
OP, you really listed a problem for podiatry. I think podiatric schools need to accept higher MCATs. I'm sorry, but you need to understand that if you are not doing well on the MCAT, then how do you expect to do well on your board exams in the future? You need to do well on the MCAT. If you do well on the MCAT and choose podiatry out of interest, that is way better than doing poorly and doing podiatry just so that you can settle for less.
 

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OP, you really listed a problem for podiatry. I think podiatric schools need to accept higher MCATs. I'm sorry, but you need to understand that if you are not doing well on the MCAT, then how do you expect to do well on your board exams in the future? You need to do well on the MCAT. If you do well on the MCAT and choose podiatry out of interest, that is way better than doing poorly and doing podiatry just so that you can settle for less.
Agreed I thought about podiatry until my scores were good enough for MD or DO so I threw it out due to I really am not interested in looking at feet all day. In all honesty if you make a 18-23 on the MCAT you probably don't know your stuff. I mean I just took practice tests no studying and got a 505 with ease. You need to buckle down, learn the material first, then take the practice tests and the MCAT again.
 
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Agreed I thought about podiatry until my scores were good enough for MD or DO so I threw it out due to I really am not interested in looking at feet all day. In all honesty if you make a 18-23 on the MCAT you probably don't know your stuff. I mean I just took practice tests no studying and got a 505 with ease. You need to buckle down, learn the material first, then take the practice tests and the MCAT again.
if you had no interest in looking at feet all day, why would even consider applying to podiatry to begin with? (regardless of your mcat scores). It just seems pointless to me to consider doing something you don't like.
 
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Oct 14, 2015
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Hey everyone,

I know I will probably get berated by asking this, but here it goes. GPA: 3.4, 3.2 cumulative and science respectively.

I graduated in 2014 and studied for the MCAT. Just got back scores last week and scored a 490, about a 20 on the old test. Obviously, this is a horrible score. My main goal was DO school, but that seems out of reach now and have since started to form a backup plan. Podiatry seems like a very tempting offer, nicer hours than other surgical specialties, emphasis on biomechanics (which is what drew me to DO school in the first place), options on surgery vs non surgical approaches to medicine, etc. Most importantly, I could get into it at this moment in time.

I guess what I am asking is for those people who's first choice was not podiatry, are you glad that you settled on it in the end? I have contacted a couple of pod schools, and they said that my MCAT was fine if I applied now.

To all people actually in the profession or in school, do you regret your decision at all? 7 years is a long time to study something that your heart is not into, and I do have a bit of trepidation about entering pod school as of now. Not for the perceived lack of "prestige" however, I hold the podiatry profession in a high regard. My cousin entered the profession as a backup, but it ended up working out for her-now she is a successful doc making 110K. Seems like a good backup to me.

Thank you all for your time.
don't try to go into podiatry, it's not for you.
 
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i should clarify, don't go into podiatry until you absolutely are sure you want to do it. As of now it just seems like you are just trying to save a year of your time and just go into pod school because you bombed the mcat and don't want to retake it. If you don't love it, you're gonna get extremely frustrated once you enter school and not do well. Remember entering pod school is one thing, but actually making it through the rigorous curriculum is another.
 
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Doc NaCl

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For some people it is a backup, for many it is not. There is a lot of draw towards podiatry other than being a backup for MD/DO. Many people have had their own foot/ankle problems or have had family members that did. Others have a history working with this patient population. If you have a genuine interest in podiatry, then you'll probably get through. If you genuinely just want to be an MD/DO and podiatry is just your backup route, at some point along the way you're gonna say, why am I clipping toenails and shaving calluses EVERY DAMN DAY... #PodLife

P.S., I've also seen many people rejected so far this cycle with stats higher than yours. Temple informed us that there have been more applicants at this time in the cycle this year than there have been in decades. That means the schools are gonna have a better applicant pool to choose from. You should probably retake the MCAT or it'll be the #ChiroLife for you...
#chirolife LOL:rofl:
 
Feb 11, 2015
61
49
Status
Podiatry Student
Having Podiatry as a backup is fine, if there is some interest level there. If you like podiatry, but you really, really like ______, but you do poorly and go on to Podiatry then fine. Using Podiatry as a backup for poor test performance is a bad idea for two reasons: 1. It's a lot of money, time, and a lifelong commitment for something you didn't consider until your low score. You're not marrying the first attractive person you see after a failed engagement. 2. It's incredibly hard. Poor MCAT scores are indicative of something wrong, if you can't perform well on the MCAT, how are you going to do well on higher level exams and boards? You probably aren't getting into a school this late with a 490. When they ask what made you become interested in Podiatry, or they look to see a commitment to podiatric medicine, you can't say that it has aspects of what drew you into DO and you like the hours. You're willing to change the course of your entire life over a poor test score? If DO is your passion, take the year and destroy the MCAT. 1 year to do what you love is way more valuable than 1 year to possibly enjoy Podiatry, or dread your profession for decades.
 
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soccermac42

2+ Year Member
Feb 8, 2015
214
84
NC
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
if you had no interest in looking at feet all day, why would even consider applying to podiatry to begin with? (regardless of your mcat scores). It just seems pointless to me to consider doing something you don't like.
Because I can.
 

Weirdy

2+ Year Member
Mar 2, 2016
2,083
2,511
Status
Podiatry Student
Hey everyone,

I know I will probably get berated by asking this, but here it goes. GPA: 3.4, 3.2 cumulative and science respectively.

I graduated in 2014 and studied for the MCAT. Just got back scores last week and scored a 490, about a 20 on the old test. Obviously, this is a horrible score. My main goal was DO school, but that seems out of reach now and have since started to form a backup plan. Podiatry seems like a very tempting offer, nicer hours than other surgical specialties, emphasis on biomechanics (which is what drew me to DO school in the first place), options on surgery vs non surgical approaches to medicine, etc. Most importantly, I could get into it at this moment in time.

I guess what I am asking is for those people who's first choice was not podiatry, are you glad that you settled on it in the end? I have contacted a couple of pod schools, and they said that my MCAT was fine if I applied now.

To all people actually in the profession or in school, do you regret your decision at all? 7 years is a long time to study something that your heart is not into, and I do have a bit of trepidation about entering pod school as of now. Not for the perceived lack of "prestige" however, I hold the podiatry profession in a high regard. My cousin entered the profession as a backup, but it ended up working out for her-now she is a successful doc making 110K. Seems like a good backup to me.

Thank you all for your time.
You've only taken it once. Relearn the material. Find out which section is killing you. Dedicate 2-3 months of studying. Why stop if you've only retaken it once?

I also hope you havn't fallen into the fallacy of thinking podiatry is any easier than med school. Yes the stats to get in are lower. No, it doesn't mean you can just coast through once you get in. There are at least 2/9 pod schools to my knowledge that have their first 2 years mixed with their DO students. It doesn't get any easier from here. That being said you seem pretty level-headed because you know you're going to get flak for asking this question.

Shadow a podiatrist. Thoroughly. If your gut isn't in it, don't do it and focus on killing your MCAT so you can be a more competitive applicant for DO schools. Simple as that. If you spend the next 2 years going back and forth between backup options and letting people sway you, you'll never get any where.

You have a plan. You've had some set backs. Stick with it.
 
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KSUCPM2015

5+ Year Member
Jun 21, 2013
65
38
Status
Resident [Any Field]
@GypsyHummus as to your statement that podiatry is a backup for you, I have to say it was for me as well and at this point I am very satisfied with my ultimate choice to do podiatry instead of spending another year applying for MD/DO schools. If anyone finds that "insulting" or "in it for the wrong reasons" then, tough, that's their problem, you do what you want to do and what works out for you, as long as you're aware that the actual curriculum at podiatry school is very similar in content and difficulty to MD/DO, though the admission standards are somewhat lower (though this is becoming less and less the case).

As to your MCAT, you're really looking at a 490 being in the 16-17 range with the old exam. At that score, it's one of two things that is the issue:
1. you didn't study enough (easy to fix if you have the will to do so)
2. you are manifestly not suited for a career in medicine, whether it's MD/DO/DPM/DVM/DC/DDS/PharmD/Dwhatever (impossible to fix)

Bottom line is retake the MCAT and if you do well enough, apply wherever you want to whatever field you want.
On another note, and take this to heart because I have seen this with my own eyes, don't be that guy who throws around his political views or personal ideas at people, especially to insult them. That guy doesn't get a residency in any branch of medicine.
 

PodasaurusRex

2+ Year Member
Sep 15, 2015
86
95
MO
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Good. I still can't believe that unlatching was allowed to happen, but we will most likely be saying the same thing about MD/DO residencies in the very near future. At the rate they are opening up new schools, I suspect another 5 years and there will be a significant bottleneck for all but the lowest primary care spots.
As far as unmatching happening "in the very near future", that goes on every year for MD applicants too for years, not just pod. About 6.5% don't match every year (http://www.nrmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Main-Match-Results-and-Data-2015_final.pdf) and some years it has been worse. Residency shortage is an issue in pretty much any medical profession that offers them. It comes with the territory. Which is why you want to be confident you can finish strong before you even begin.
 
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