Jul 25, 2009
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Do different programs at medical schools have higher acceptance rates than others? Like if I were to apply to a med-school for a psychology program would it be more difficult or easier to get into than if I were to apply for a normal doctor program?
 
Dec 21, 2008
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Like if I were to apply to a med-school for a psychology program would it be more difficult or easier to get into than if I were to apply for a normal doctor program?
You don't really apply to medical school for any program other than a joint professional degree (MD/PhD, MD/MBA, etc.); you basically apply for medicine and choose a specialty in the form of a residency.
 

schrizto

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Do different programs at medical schools have higher acceptance rates than others? Like if I were to apply to a med-school for a psychology program would it be more difficult or easier to get into than if I were to apply for a normal doctor program?
No such thing as a "med-school for a psychology program"...
 

FutureCTDoc

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Med schools vary in terms of difficulty to gain entry, the path is
A. Baccalaureate
B. MD/DO
C. Internship Year PGY-1
D. Residency PGY-2
E. Completion of Residency BC/BE
F. Practice
Total Time: 4+4+3 to 7= 11-15 years
 

NickNaylor

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All medical schools provide the basic educational foundation. There is a difference in difficulty in specialty (which is what you're referring to, i.e. psychology vs. family practice), but you don't enter those different training tracks (a.k.a. residencies) until after you graduate medical school.
 

bunnity

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All medical schools provide the basic educational foundation. There is a difference in difficulty in specialty (which is what you're referring to, i.e. psychology vs. family practice), but you don't enter those different training tracks (a.k.a. residencies) until after you graduate medical school.
Psychiatry is a medical specialty. Psychology is not.

To become a psychiatrist you go to undergrad, then med school, and then do a psychiatry residency. To become a psychologist you do undergrad plus grad school and you end up with a Ph.D. or a Psy.D.
 

NickNaylor

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Psychiatry is a medical specialty. Psychology is not.

To become a psychiatrist you go to undergrad, then med school, and then do a psychiatry residency. To become a psychologist you do undergrad plus grad school and you end up with a Ph.D. or a Psy.D.
:thumbup:

Sorry, didn't see the error.