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DMD/MD degree

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by DoctorSaab, Mar 18, 2004.

  1. DoctorSaab

    DoctorSaab Senior Member
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    I was watching TV the other day, and I saw this interview with this doctor who had a DMD and an MD degree. This guy was performing a surgery that dealt with reconstructing a girl's entire jaw.

    Anyway, i was wondering how does one go about obtaining a DMD (DDS) degree AND an MD degree?

    Impressive stuff.
     
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  3. drpduck

    drpduck Senior Member
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    A MD can be obtained in a Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery 6 yr residency after dental school. Do a search about OMS, there is tons of information on the board about it.
     
  4. Mo007

    Mo007 Gifted Hands
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    Yep!

    So, 4 years of DDS/DMD + 6 years OMS/MD = 10 years... without the MD = 8 years.

    Further specialization in the Medical field can be done after the 10 years, depending on the specialty area (Anaesthesiology, Plastic, Cardio, Neuro or General Surgery )... which require at-least additional 2 or more years.

    If one wants to persue in the above route, its quicker to do it through Medical School. Except, OMS is only exclusive to Dentistry.
     
  5. sxr71

    sxr71 Senior Member
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    I met this guy that was finishing up his fourth year of Med school who was applying to dental school because he was dead set on doing OMS.
     
  6. ItsGavinC

    Dentist Moderator Emeritus 15+ Year Member

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    Interesting. He probably should have just pursued ENT. There is extensive overlap between the two specialties, especially when it comes to trauma and staffing for hospitals. He probably wouldn't have seen much difference in his job duties by striving for an ENT match.
     
  7. aphistis

    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Agreed. I wonder what the guy's motivations were.
     
  8. drpduck

    drpduck Senior Member
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    The OMS clinic I volunteer with was interviewing a medical student a few weeks ago for a residency position. From what I hear it can be done but is pretty rare.
     
  9. sxr71

    sxr71 Senior Member
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    I didn't ask much, but I was wondering about that. I got the impression that he probably wasn't in a good position to match into ENT, which I understand is a competitive specialty.
     
  10. Dentalist

    Dentalist carpe diem
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    He should realize how hard it is to get into OMS programs from dental school. It may not be as hard as neurosurgery programs but it is pretty competitive that there is no such thing as guarantee.
     
  11. larryt

    larryt Senior Member
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    Look at this

    A run-down of other fields represented in the match at Case, listed alphabetically: anesthesiology, five matches; dermatology, one; neurology, four; obstetrics/gynecology, five; oral and maxillofacial surgery, two ; orthopaedic surgery, five; pathology, two; physical medicine and rehabilitation, two; psychiatry, five; radiology - diagnostic, four; radiation oncology, four; transitional, one; and urology, one.

    oral and maxillofacial surgery, two
     
  12. Mo007

    Mo007 Gifted Hands
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    That's about 3% chance if you are in Case's DMD class to get OMS match. But there are over 100 OMS programs around the country... if your board exams and class ranking is good, you will get a match.
     
  13. larryt

    larryt Senior Member
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    No, those are 4th year medical students i guess.

    Read more in this

    CLEVELAND (March 18, 2004) ? Today meant the start of March Madness for college basketball fans. To medical students across the country, however, today was Match Madness.

    Marking one of the last hurdles before commencement, March Day is when graduating M.D. students learn where they?ll be spending the next three to seven years of their lives undergoing the additional training necessary to practice and receive board certification. During the year, students have interviewed at hospitals around the country and have listed their preferences as to where they will receive this additional training. On Match Day, they discover how their choices match up with the hospitals at which they have interviewed.

    At the Case School of Medicine, students, with their family members and friends, gathered at the Wolstein Research Building and eagerly counted the minutes until noon, when they would be permitted to access the table where the envelopes containing their fates awaited.

    As that time approached, Richard D. Aach, M.D., associate dean and director of residency and career planning, told them, ?You did fantastically well, and we?re very, very proud of you. What?s really evident is that you matched outstanding programs that really were your top choices.?

    Aach said about one fourth of the 137 students participating in the match this year will be undertaking residencies at University Hospitals of Cleveland or MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland and that, overall, about 40 percent of the class matched to residencies in Ohio and about 25 programs in the same number of states also are represented in the residency programs to be filled by Case medical students.

    Ralph I. Horwitz, M.D., medical school dean and university vice president for medical affairs, attending his second consecutive Match Day at Case and his first since leaving Yale to become dean on April 1, 2003, told students, ?In the past year, I have learned that Case medical students are among the best in the country.? Additional proof of that excellence came when the students opened their envelopes to reveal matches to prestigious programs in Cleveland and elsewhere.

    Primary care fields remained popular among students around the country, including those in Cleveland. Forty-seven percent of Case students matched in primary care fields. The specialty with the greatest number of matches at Case was internal medicine, with 29 matches (21 percent of the class). Pediatrics was the second most popular specialty among students in Cleveland, with 24 matches (18 percent). Primary care also was represented through six matches to internal medicine/pediatrics residencies and five matches to family medicine programs (four percent each).

    As is the case nationally, the specialties of emergency medicine and surgery continued to be increasingly popular among Case students, with nine matches each, and eight students chose ophthalmology residencies.

    A run-down of other fields represented in the match at Case, listed alphabetically: anesthesiology, five matches; dermatology, one; neurology, four; obstetrics/gynecology, five; oral and maxillofacial surgery, two; orthopaedic surgery, five; pathology, two; physical medicine and rehabilitation, two; psychiatry, five; radiology - diagnostic, four; radiation oncology, four; transitional, one; and urology, one.
     
  14. gryffindor

    Dentist 10+ Year Member

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    Hey larryt - I think those med school match lists are a little misleading.

    I was initially confused when I saw two matches to OMS at case, two to OMS at Mt. Sinai, etc. Then I saw a current OMS resident here at Buffalo listed on the Buffalo medical match list as matching in "Preliminary Surgery" and I think I've figured it out.

    The OMS matches listed on the medical student match lists are the 2 students currently accepted and in the Case OMS program. I don't think they are 2 students in the senior dental class, they are the 2 residents already in the Case OMS program, perhaps doing the medical school part. Based on what I saw on the Buffalo list, the current third year OMS resident has to apply to the medical school match for the "preliminary surgery" spot b/c he is currently considered as being a 4th year med student. I think that's the same situation with seeing OMS matches listed on the Case & Mt. Sinai medical school matches.

    I don't know if this is making any sense to you guys - basically those matches don't have any senior dental student results on them so don't rely on them for that. They are matches of 4th year med students and in the case of OMS, those guys on the match list probably have their DDS already behind them.
     
  15. SillyRabbit

    SillyRabbit Trix R 4 Kidz
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    Yeah griffin04....that does make sense. After the two years at the med school you're part of that graduating class so they include you as going into OMS in their match lists. I was wondering about that too. Good thinking.
     
  16. River13

    River13 Senior Member
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    Griffin is exactly correct.

    There are some OMS residencies that take graduating medical students into them...I know Baylor and Louisville occasionally take MD's into the 6year curriculum, and there's a few others.

    As far as ENT and OMS being very similiar, that's partially true in a residency setting, but not in a private practice setting...most OMS's pull teeth and do implants for >80% of their time...ENT does nothing similiar to this...the other 20% is where there is SOME overlap.
     

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