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Do men make more than women for doing the same job?

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mentos

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I'm a guy and I see stuff on social media all the time about how women are paid 30% less for doing the same work. Last time I checked, all pharmacists make the same amount regardless of gender. Are they talking about other fields? Is pharmacy the exception?
 

Dr Wario

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I'm a guy and I see stuff on social media all the time about how women are paid 30% less for doing the same work. Last time I checked, all pharmacists make the same amount regardless of gender. Are they talking about other fields? Is pharmacy the exception?

I doubt pharmacists would fall into this category but other occupations may apply. I strongly believe that women and men should be paid equally for doing the SAME job (though often they really are not doing the same job).
 
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generallyspeaking

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Part of it also has to do with the perception of work that men do versus women. For example, patients may feel more comfortable with a male doing their plastic surgery than a female doctor. Because they inherently perceive that the male doctor's service was worth more, their value/earnings increase.

Male plumber versus female plumber? Male pilot versus female pilot? Individual perceptions from a consumer standpoint also tend to bias men as being more favorable to work with. It's not necessarily just employers paying differently solely on gender, but also inclusive of the perceived quality of work that each gender produces (all else being equal, like credentials, age, etc) and its perceived value.
 

Momus

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Lots of factors, all play into roles...
  1. They are not doing the same job most of the time
  2. Men work more than women, women like to work part time, lower total $
  3. Women take more days off due to "family" emergency, hence lower pay
  4. Child bearing really kill a woman desire to put 100% into their work, family always number 1 priority, employer perceive this badly and will give lower pay for women
  5. The damn double standard... Women like men who pay on dates or be "provider". Society answers... Give more pay for men. Unless this is gone, men will get paid more most of the time.
  6. Women are bad salary negotiators
I could list more but this are some major factors why women often make less than men. Some of these will never go away.
 
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rph3664

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It's true, and it's not true. When age, amount of time at the job, and reproductive status are compared, the gap narrows considerably; women are more likely to work part-time than men, and there are some very physical, often high-paying jobs that are male-dominated by default because most women simply do not have the stamina to do them.

Having separate pay scales for men and women is massively illegal and has been since the early 1960s.
 
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ldiot

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If you add up the average earnings of men vs women in the United States women make 30% less.

If you look at men vs women in the same job it's the same.

Why is this? Because men and women generally choose different jobs. There is no systematic discrimination as many media outlets and/or political figures suggest; rather, men and women make different life choices. No economist takes the gender pay gap seriously.

Why are men more likely to commit suicide? Why do men fill the prisons? Does this mean that society is systematically discriminating against men?
 
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ldiot

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I doubt pharmacists would fall into this category but other occupations may apply. I strongly believe that women and men should be paid equally for doing the SAME job (though often they really are not doing the same job).

Technically two people with the same job should be paid the same only if they do equal work. If two people have the same job and one does a better job they should be paid more regardless of gender. I'm not implying that you were saying otherwise but couldn't resist adding to this.
 

generallyspeaking

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Technically two people with the same job should be paid the same only if they do equal work. If two people have the same job and one does a better job they should be paid more regardless of gender. I'm not implying that you were saying otherwise but couldn't resist adding to this.

Like I wrote above, the perception of who does a better job is usually biased towards men. Only when you look at objective metrics and mask gender does that bias disappear.
 

ldiot

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Like I wrote above, the perception of who does a better job is usually biased towards men. Only when you look at objective metrics and mask gender does that bias disappear.

Why then do men and women in the same jobs make the same amount on average? If your subjective statement were true this wouldn't be the case. The pay gap is only observed when looking at average income for all jobs.
 

fcrc

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For me it only makes sense that there is all sorts of discrimination based on gender, race, nationality, and even appearance based on who is doing the hiring--at least subconsciously. At big corporate chains they appear to do their best to adhere to non-discrimination laws. At smaller businesses/independent pharmacies, that's not the case...there are some pharmacies in my city that will not even consider hiring you if you're not Indian, preferably a man; it follows that if they did hire a woman, she's probably be paid less.
 

WVUPharm2007

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This myth persist because middle class white women like to feel discriminated against and consider themselves a minority.
 
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rxdawg21

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I find it funny this is still a thing. For the most part this is definitely not true when comparing equal candidates. However it does seem that there are less women at the top of companies then men, again I think this has to do with sheer numbers and factors already listed (drive, work-life balance women really want, etc.). I find with most movements I notice on the news, every side picks out statistics that make there side look good, yet don't dig deeper into it and look at other variables and stats. And most Americans take it hook line and sinker and this is why we have such crap politicians
 

sakigt

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All the PRN Pharmacists we have are women, and therefore dont get raises. They also dont get paid more because they dont earn benefits.

Also, some women like me dont take a hike to make more because the schedule I have works well for my family.
 
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gwarm01

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Ok, glad I'm not the only person who has recently heard that this commonly held belief isn't entirely true. It hasn't held true in my experience with pharmacy at least. Last year a new woman was hired and after we became friends I found out she made the same as me, despite me having been at the hospital for three years and having negotiated a higher starting wage. I guess the best way to get a real raise is still to change jobs.
 
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lord999

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In Walgreens and Walmart, that WAS the case for years as negotiating a salary was the employee's problem (up to 2006 for Walgreens), but lawsuits 'changed' that in both cases. That's kind of why at least Walgreens and Walmart finally adopted a scale salary like the rest of the companies. Before, you used to have to negotiate those matters with the RxS. A scale salary doesn't mean that everyone in a market is paid the same, but the salaries are explainable by a neutral party when arbitration needs to happen.

For the federal government, there is actually still both a salary and pay imbalance between men and women, but not when you take into account the rank structures as the OPM mandates and regulates pay and raise benefits. If compared without qualification, men do actually make more than women. When compared rank by rank and step by step, the salaries are equal, but men still are paid more due to OT differences. But at the rank structure, men hold many more of the senior ranks (GS-14 and up to SES) than women even adjusting for the age and experience gaps. The distributions for the SES pharmacists within the federal government (all twenty-eight federalwide) are predominantly men (as in 4 F to 24 M and none of the 4 F just have PharmD as a qualification while there are actually BS, RPh's among the men). Same with GS-15 (Chief/Director grade) and GS-14 (Deputy Director grade) which are also predominantly men (don't have the OPM numbers in front of me). There's still considered to be a promotion differential not in favor of women pharmacists considering the demographics in the civil service, and whether it's due to lifestyle choices (that's one explanation), network effects of guys hire guys (that's another explanation), simple gender discrimination (that's another explanation), or the lack of time are satisfying explanations even in part.

I don't hold the belief that in our generation, that there will be an institutional problem with the FDA, NIH, or VA having their Chief Pharmacist, Title 42 NIH Senior Investigator, and Chief Consultants be women. However, I know enough of the Boomers and X'ers in those positions right now to know that some of them have more regressive beliefs that they know better than to air in public. And then there is NIH, which still has a quite sizable group (thankfully in the older generations) that is openly misogynistic that we are just waiting them out until their death or retirement which I feel very confident that despite the measures taken have impeded good science from being done.
 

BidingMyTime

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I don't believe in a system-wide wage gap.....of course, there is invariably some discrimination going on it certain individual places, but these are the (illegal) exceptions.

Much of the pay disparity comes from comparing educationally similar, but vastly different jobs. Like comparing men and women who have a 4 year degree and their pay, but not looking at the differences in their major (ie comparing a male-dominated field like engineering with a female-dominated field like social work.)

Also, as other's have explained above, women are more likely to work part-time, and more likely to take off a few to several years when they raise children---so of course, this will affect their wages, especially in career fields where one has to start at the bottom and "work their way up."

As for pharmacists, no they aren't paid the same anymore, newer pharmacists (whether male or female) are invariably hired at lower rates than new pharmacists were hired 10 years ago.
 
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