GBCrzzyy

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Are DO/PhD programs fundamentally set up in a similar way to MD/PhD programs? Similar time frame, funding, etc. What would be considered competitive stats for DO/PhD? So far I've applied mostly DO only with a few MD only. I'm considering applying to add a PhD later. Like depending on how med school starts off for me and what not. I really want to end up in a teaching hospital in the far future and I was told by my pre-med advisor that adding a PhD would help a lot when it comes to getting into a teaching hospital. Thoughts?
 

parpar2222

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same here! debating on that too cause I would love to pursue research. Currently I am getting my MPH in Biostatistics, so I feel like it would be really compatible with a PhD cause I would
be able to run my own research project as well as conduct the analysis. LOL that's so far ahead for me though...

PCOM just sent me a secondary and I am debating whether or not to checkmark the DO/Phd option cause I feel like it would be harder to get into their school. But I really, really want to research. idk.
 

AlteredScale

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Are DO/PhD programs fundamentally set up in a similar way to MD/PhD programs? Similar time frame, funding, etc. What would be considered competitive stats for DO/PhD? So far I've applied mostly DO only with a few MD only. I'm considering applying to add a PhD later. Like depending on how med school starts off for me and what not. I really want to end up in a teaching hospital in the far future and I was told by my pre-med advisor that adding a PhD would help a lot when it comes to getting into a teaching hospital. Thoughts?
There are two main tracks to MD/PhD: one is NIH funded (designated as an MSTP, I believe between 20-30 top MD programs offer this). The other is non-MSTP.

DO/PHD programs are non-MSTP and unlike the MD non-MSTP they do not offer full stipend coverage in terms of tuition and/or room and board which means you'll be borrowing a lot of money for an extended period of time (6-8 years).

I don't believe your premed advisor is accurate about the process of landing a residency in a university medical center. The only way a DO/PhD would truly help is if you were competitive enough to apply for the ABIM physician scientist track which as a DO/PhD is very unlikely that would happen (search UCSDs ABIM track residents and you'll see their track record). This is because PhD programs at DO schools even ones at MSU or OU don't have as strong of a reputation than doing and MD/PHD in terms of NHH dollars obtained and high impact activity produced (meaning top level journal publications).

People applying for MD/DO,PhD programs are highly highly competitive. For MD/PhD you're looking at 36-37 range for the MCAT and 3.8-4.0 for GPA. For DO/PhD from what I remember with MSU was that many of the applicants were around the 33-35 range for the Mcat. Almost all of them have had significantly strong experiences in the lab many of whom with multiple national conference posters/presentations as well as authorship in publications.

I don't believe it is possible to all of a sudden decide to apply for a PhD if you are in an MD/DO-only program. I may be wrong though. Someone in the research forum (which I moved this topic to) may be able to correct me and further address your concerns as well.




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eteshoe

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@AlteredScale covered a lot of the points. I just wanted to add that if you you're at an MD school (I don't know about DO schools), you may be able to internally apply to the dual degree program (though you'd still be on the hook for the first 2 yrs of med school). Also, one thing to remember is that your stats need to be strong enough to get into the PhD program (e.g. having enough research experience to show the adcom that you could complete the degree).

Overall, if your goal is to have teaching be a significant portion of your future medical career, the PhD really isn't necessary (and rarely will add that much to your residency prospects all things considered).
 
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Fencer

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Just keep in mind that there are at least 30 non-MSTP MD/PhD programs that are fully funded. Many of these MD/PhD programs indirectly receive NIH funding for MD/PhD students in the form of competitive F30 fellowship awards for their students. In addition, the number of MSTP funded programs is around 45 (downs and up every few grant cycles) programs with about 20 to 35% of their slots being funded by that T32 grant from NIGMS.
 
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GBCrzzyy

GBCrzzyy

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Thanks for all the info! I honestly don't think my premed advisor was accurate with most of the information he gave me. He rarely even answers my questions and just asks if I've taken the MCAT over and over again even though during every appointment I tell him I have. He refuses to look at my PS or even give advice on a school list. I wish I had a way to write a review about him. I am definitely not applying to DO/PhD it was just a thought but if the PhD isn't necessary to get me in the door at a teaching hospital it doesn't sound like the right choice for me. I still plan on being as involved in research as I can during medical school though.