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Do submitted publications count towards overall count in the NRMP data?

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deleted1038938

When you submit your ERAS app, do you delineate between “published” vs “accepted for publication” vs “submitted”??
from what older students told me yes there is a separate for published+accepted ( i think those two are lumped together) and submitted is separate.

 
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mistafab

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Submitted papers are not publications. By definition, a publication is published.

No need to falsify on your eras. You can “count” it as a research experience.
 
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deleted1038938

Submitted papers are not publications. By definition, a publication is published.

No need to falsify on your eras. You can “count” it as a research experience.
Ummmm....Who said anything about falsifying? lol. I was just asking because I wanted to compare myself with the NRMP where they just have a broad category in the reported specialty data for abstracts/pubs/presentations. Everyone here including frogger was asking for clarification smfh.

Once again you have NOT answered the question. I gave a link where there is a submitted column where someone recorded it. You can show yourself out
 
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Sky138

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This is somewhat off topic but I figured this might be a good place to start. I’m matriculating to the UWSOM in the August and I have a significant research background. As in 8 publications+corresponding presentations with early authorships in journals such as the International Journal for Radiation Oncology, Journal for Clinical Oncology, and the International Journal for Particle Therapy. If I’m still interested in oncology, do you guys think I still need to continue doing research or am I set?
 

slowthai

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This is somewhat off topic but I figured this might be a good place to start. I’m matriculating to the UWSOM in the August and I have a significant research background. As in 8 publications+corresponding presentations with early authorships in journals such as the International Journal for Radiation Oncology, Journal for Clinical Oncology, and the International Journal for Particle Therapy. If I’m still interested in oncology, do you guys think I still need to continue doing research or am I set?

Rad onc is a buyer's market right now, so I'd say no, lol. You can coast off the strength of your previous work. Take a stroll on over to the rad onc forum and you'll see what I mean. But if I was in your shoes, I'd do at least one project just for insurance, in case things miraculously turn around by the time it's your turn to apply for the match. You don't want any "You were really active before med school, what happened?" questions. @evilbooyaa, what do you think?
 
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evilbooyaa

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This is somewhat off topic but I figured this might be a good place to start. I’m matriculating to the UWSOM in the August and I have a significant research background. As in 8 publications+corresponding presentations with early authorships in journals such as the International Journal for Radiation Oncology, Journal for Clinical Oncology, and the International Journal for Particle Therapy. If I’m still interested in oncology, do you guys think I still need to continue doing research or am I set?

Most folks interested in research want to see production in medical school as well.

Yes, rad onc is now not competitive in terms of getting A spot, but it is still competitive at the top, and some folks suggest that the job market will be most strongly affected at the 'low-tier' residency programs that have been struggling to match.

While it is no longer 'mandatory' to do research to get into rad onc as it was as recently as 5 years ago, doing some projects will only help to solidify your position.

However, this is only for radiation oncology. There are multiple oncology specialties, and the rest of them are fellowships, for which the primary focus is to get into a good quality residency (say IM for heme-onc) and have oncology focused research.
 
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