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Does Yale have any preference for CT residents?

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ilovescrubs

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Im in-state and although I realize they are private and I'm sure very difficult to get in to, I was just wondering what info ppl had? Thanks.
 

TheRealMD

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:confused:
Im in-state and although I realize they are private and I'm sure very difficult to get in to, I was just wondering what info ppl had? Thanks.

Yale:

In-state: 10/164 = 6% matriculated
Out-of-state: 78/4096 = 1.9% matriculated

So, yes, apparently being a resident of CT increases your chances 3x of getting in. Of course, with only ~99 spots, odds weren't very high in the first place.
 

nick_carraway

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Yale:

In-state: 10/164 = 6% matriculated
Out-of-state: 78/4096 = 1.9% matriculated

So, yes, apparently being a resident of CT increases your chances 3x of getting in. Of course, with only ~99 spots, odds weren't very high in the first place.
Wow and I was thinking no.

Always with the shocking data, TheRealMD.
 

TheRealMD

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Wow and I was thinking no.

Always with the shocking data, TheRealMD.

Numbers don't lie too often, and in this case, it's pretty clean cut what they represent.
 

lord_jeebus

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Yale:

In-state: 10/164 = 6% matriculated
Out-of-state: 78/4096 = 1.9% matriculated

So, yes, apparently being a resident of CT increases your chances 3x of getting in. Of course, with only ~99 spots, odds weren't very high in the first place.

CT residents are more likely to choose to matriculate at Yale, but that doesn't mean it's easier to get in.
 

hateroftheyear

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In-state acceptance rate: 18.1% (32/177)
Out-of-state acceptance rate: 5.9% (208/3522)

the 3x chance bears out at both the admission and matriculation stages.

-hater

edit: this is data for the entering class in fall 2005. sorry.
 

lord_jeebus

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Interesting.

I wonder how many of the CT residents are current Yale students.
 

TheRealMD

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CT residents are more likely to choose to matriculate at Yale, but that doesn't mean it's easier to get in.

Interview stats:
In-state: 60/164 = 36.5% interviewed
Out-of-state: 678/4076 = 16.6% interviewed

I would assume that if you cared enough to pay the secondary fee and write the essays that you'd want to go. Even for interviews, they are heavily skewed in-state percentage-wise.

Now, are the favoring you? Probably not so much (certainly not actively). But your percentages are definitely higher than a random OOS applicant.
 

sanchopanza

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Man; you guys and your numbers. I'm just tryin' to live my life and get into medical school.
 
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deleted103644

Almost every school that officially does not treat in-state and out-of-state applicants differently has some bias towards in-state applicants (I think Brown's the main exception), and it's probably because if you are in-state you can get more relevant recommendations - i.e. ones the medical schools take more seriously. That's my guess at least.
 

TheRealMD

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Almost every school that officially does not treat in-state and out-of-state applicants differently has some bias towards in-state applicants (I think Brown's the main exception), and it's probably because if you are in-state you can get more relevant recommendations - i.e. ones the medical schools take more seriously. That's my guess at least.

Or maybe it's because of state ties. They often see the same professors write letters and are able to generally compare letters from one person to the next. I know that my ochem II prof adds some extra stuff about our performance in his class if we are in the top 20 (out of 480). He just omits it if we aren't. So there's definitely some additional scrutiny from OOS applicants that they might not be used to.

Edit: 1000 POSTS!!!! WOOT.
 

Yehosh

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Interesting.

I wonder how many of the CT residents are current Yale students.

Jeebus has it right

Many of the CT applicants that get in are probably Yale students

I remember during interview day they one of the things in teh folder they hand out was a list of matriculants and their background. Many of them went to Yale for UG
 

LizzyM

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Attending Yale would not make Connecticut one's state of residence. On the other hand, if one's parents live in Connecticut, then it is likely that you would call Connecticut your state of residence. Now imagine how many Yale faculty members would have children who are CT residents.

Could it be the small number of matriculants who make it seem as if there is a preference for state residents is actually just a small number of applicants who have very strong ties to Yale?
 
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