War Eagle

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What does anyone out there know about dual degrees? Is anyone doing one? How much more work is it? Does getting a dual degree affect residency placement, and if so, how much? I know that the curriculum in pod school is highly demanding, so I'm wondering if it is feasible to do that and still excell at the important stuff.
 

Dr. Gangrene

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What does anyone out there know about dual degrees? Is anyone doing one? How much more work is it? Does getting a dual degree affect residency placement, and if so, how much? I know that the curriculum in pod school is highly demanding, so I'm wondering if it is feasible to do that and still excell at the important stuff.

I can only speak for azpod. They have a degree (I believe they call it an MHPE - master of health professions education). It is basically an enhancement that would help if you want to get into academia. I know some of the courses focus on curriculum development and implementation etc.

It would probably not help getting a residency, but is more geared to help you teach. It is about 30 credits extra (if I remember right). You can check it out www.midwestern.edu

Some schools offer dpm/phd etc. You have to look at what you want to do. If you are looking for alphabet soup behind your name, there are probably better routes. If your goal is research in pod med, then a dpm/phd would be beneficial.

Waste of money do get degrees you won't use in my opinion
 
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I just don't think it's necessary to slap another 50G on top of the loans. I am sure there are DPM without that degree teaches too. If you really want to research, everybody has told me that chicago has the best research facility. You might want to try that school.

PhD is just a bit too expensive on top of the pod school. Unless any school offers for free with stipend or you are really interested in research.

I called DMU, and they really have a nice school. From what I heard from them, the graduates pretty much have their pick for residencies. I don't know about the others schools. But if residency is your concern, I guess you may just want to go to the best schools.
 

cool_vkb

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PhD is just a bit too expensive on top of the pod school. Unless any school offers for free with stipend or you are really interested in research.
.


DPM+PHD:

PM1+PM2+(3-4yrs of Phd) +PM3+PM4 + (3 yrs residency) =11yrs in school:laugh:

Now if someone really wanna spend 11yrs in just education. then be my guest, go for PhD.:) I wudnt go there at all. if i liked research, i wud go and do a direct PhD which will just be 5-6yrs rather than doing a dual degree. Its so practical what would i do with a PhD in my medical practice, simply that much time gone.
 

War Eagle

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Thanks for the input. I am not too interested in doing research or having a bunch of titles behind my name. I had just read somewhere that it can help in getting into the top notch residencies.
 

Feli

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...Waste of money do get degrees you won't use in my opinion
This is basically my opinion. Barry has DPM/MBA or DPM/MPH available. A few people in my class are doing each of the dual programs, and the dual is a relatively good deal for people who really want that extra degree. If you do the extra degree while doing the DPM, it costs only maybe 50-75% of what it would if you went back and got it afterwards.

An MBA might be helpful if you're going to start your own practice or an MPH could be nice if you are interested in public health or research, but it really puts a strain on your schedule to take even an extra 3hr evening or Saturday class one or two days per week in addition to all the pod classes. As far as the extra degree helping land a good residency, I seriously doubt it... it might have the opposite effect if you're spending more time learning accounting or epidemiology versus lower extremity anatomy and pathology and your podiatry GPA or knowledge consequently suffers. You also have to consider whether you'd actually be learning much in the evening masters degree classes or whether you'd just be going through the motions and doing the minimum to pass them.

The place an extra degree may actually give an edge would be in getting a job afterwards: a hospital might like the MPH degree on your resume or an MBA looks good to a group practice by showing the partners you have some business sense.

I considered the MPH because public health is interesting and important, but it's just not for me even at the discounted price of $15k-20k or whatever it was going to cost. You have to consider that over the life of the loan (assume 20yrs to repay at 5% APR), that extra $20k principle loan turns into $32k that you've paid back by the time all is said and done. I'd rather just read a couple books on the subject or maybe do a similar degree during residency or later on down the line when my time and $ aren't already running extremely thin.

If you want alphabet soup on your business card, Barry lets you get an MS in biomedical sciences after the first 4 basic science semesters anyways because you've done the same classes. The criteria are just that you have a bachelors already, got a 3.0 in those basic sciences, pay $25 to take the MS comp exam, and that you obviously pass that exam. $25 for a masters degree certainly isn't bad and I think it's a great program by the pod administrators here. Some academic pod residencies also will offer the opportunity to earn some sort of MS degree later pretty cheap or even free (MS in clinical investigation, MPH, etc). Besides, you'll eventually get plenty of surgical affiliations acronyms anyway if you do a PMS-36.

Like I said, I'm not in a dual degree program and am not saying it's a bad idea... just not for me. I'm just providing a little info to get you thinking. Maybe you'll get lucky and someone who is doing one of the duals can chime in on how it affects their loans, schedule, etc so you get it from the horse's mouth. I'd say only about 20% of my classmates are doing a dual degree program. Many more did the MS degree for $25 and will have that on their CV, but that wasn't any extra classes or much more studying for that comp exam because they're the same courses you took for the podiatry program anyways.
 

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DPM+PHD:

PM1+PM2+(3-4yrs of Phd) +PM3+PM4 + (3 yrs residency) =11yrs in school:laugh:

Now if someone really wanna spend 11yrs in just education. then be my guest, go for PhD.:) I wudnt go there at all. if i liked research, i wud go and do a direct PhD which will just be 5-6yrs rather than doing a dual degree. Its so practical what would i do with a PhD in my medical practice, simply that much time gone.

THe typicall route for MD/PhD is 2years med school (little work on PhD as well in those 2 years) then 2 more years on PhD, then 2 final years of med school. If you do it right. It should take 6 to 7 years.

So the DPM/PhD if done in a combined program should take the same amount of time 6-7 years.

I'm sure everyone out there has a friend that did it in less time or more time but 6-7 is what the MSTP (masters scientists training program) thru the NIH says.
 

songaila

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:D :D :D From what I heard, MD/PHD combined degree is free plus they give you stipend.

But I like your thinking, I am going to be a degree collector too. Ed Song DPM.PHD.DDS.MD.NP.DC.PA-C plus three year residency. I will graduate when I am 88. Hey but the collection is complete unless they invent more degrees. I forget to add Ed.D:D :D :D
 

krabmas

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:D :D :D From what I heard, MD/PHD combined degree is free plus they give you stipend.

But I like your thinking, I am going to be a degree collector too. Ed Song DPM.PHD.DDS.MD.NP.DC.PA-C plus three year residency. I will graduate when I am 88. Hey but the collection is complete unless they invent more degrees. I forget to add Ed.D:D :D :D

When I looked into the MSTP in 2002 the stipend was 17,000 a year plus they paid all tuition for medschool and PhD schooling.

Not all MDPhD programs are MSTP. Not all are pain for. Not all are combined into a few years.
 

cool_vkb

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THe typicall route for MD/PhD is 2years med school (little work on PhD as well in those 2 years) then 2 more years on PhD, then 2 final years of med school. If you do it right. It should take 6 to 7 years.

So the DPM/PhD if done in a combined program should take the same amount of time 6-7 years.

I'm sure everyone out there has a friend that did it in less time or more time but 6-7 is what the MSTP (masters scientists training program) thru the NIH says.

hey who is gonna include the 3 yr of Residency?

7+3 = 10yrs
 

krabmas

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hey who is gonna include the 3 yr of Residency?

7+3 = 10yrs

very true.

but the 3 years of residency are not like school. you get paid way more than the 17000(ish) stipend and you still do not have to pay back loans just yet. paying the interest is helpful but not necessary.
 

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I just don't think it's necessary to slap another 50G on top of the loans. I am sure there are DPM without that degree teaches too. If you really want to research, everybody has told me that chicago has the best research facility. You might want to try that school.

PhD is just a bit too expensive on top of the pod school. Unless any school offers for free with stipend or you are really interested in research.

I called DMU, and they really have a nice school. From what I heard from them, the graduates pretty much have their pick for residencies. I don't know about the others schools. But if residency is your concern, I guess you may just want to go to the best schools.

I believe that you get a stipend for each PhD year at Scholl's DPM/PhD program. Once, your done with the DPM/PhD and residency it shouldn't be too hard to find a successful position where you can pay your loans off. Actually, does anyone know of a DPM/PhD who is not sitting in a great position where they are easily paying off their loans? I think many that do get the PhD are affiliated with the a school which will pay them well.
 

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I don't know about you guys, but I think my PharmD will help me with my podiatric medical practice and at least opening some doors for residencies. When I graduate from Scholl next year (June '08) I would have been in college for 10 years, but I'll have 2 clinically-based doctorate degrees to show for it. I like to emphasize "clinical" degrees, because any PhD is research-based. So, just something for you guys to think about. I'm personally way more clinical than research.
 

cool_vkb

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I don't know about you guys, but I think my PharmD will help me with my podiatric medical practice and at least opening some doors for residencies. When I graduate from Scholl next year (June '08) I would have been in college for 10 years, but I'll have 2 clinically-based doctorate degrees to show for it. I like to emphasize "clinical" degrees, because any PhD is research-based. So, just something for you guys to think about. I'm personally way more clinical than research.

Yeah but your case is different. you first did your Dpharm and then decided to join DPM. You never started as a dual degree.We are speakin about someone making this commitment of 11yrs (including residency,etc) right from 1st year of Podiatric medicine.

But i must say, being a licensed PharmD or any allied health working professional is really a benifit. Its a good source of income flow even working part-time for few hours a week, in Pod school.
 
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