meliora27

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Mar 7, 2007
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Per EK, Steroid Hormones include those produced by the Adrenal Cortex, Gonads, and Placenta. hCG, which is produced by the placenta is not a steroid hormone, it's a peptide hormone. Did anyone else notice this?
 

hoot504

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Jan 17, 2009
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They're only half wrong. You're correct in pointing out that HCG is not a steroid hormone; but both progesterone and estrogen (produced by the placenta), are.
 
May 8, 2009
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Steroid Hormones

Estorgen
Progesteron
Testosterone

Aldosterone
Cortisol

are those the only ones we need to know?

Throxine (aka Thryoid Hormone) is the exception hormone that can diffuse through the plasma membrane but binds membrane receptors still so it doesn't alter transcription and is a amino acid derivative hormone.
 

sv3

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Feb 24, 2009
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Steroid Hormones

Estorgen
Progesteron
Testosterone

Aldosterone
Cortisol

are those the only ones we need to know?

Throxine (aka Thryoid Hormone) is the exception hormone that can diffuse through the plasma membrane but binds membrane receptors still so it doesn't alter transcription and is a amino acid derivative hormone.
thyroxine does alter transcription from what i know. Look at what you wrote......if it diffuses through the membrane, why would it bind receptors in the membrane?

it acts just like the steroids i beleive. could be wrong tho....lemme know
 

Cunninglinguist

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Jul 20, 2009
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thyroxine does alter transcription from what i know. Look at what you wrote......if it diffuses through the membrane, why would it bind receptors in the membrane?

it acts just like the steroids i beleive. could be wrong tho....lemme know

No you're correct. It does alter gene function.

You should pull out a real physiology book, it's actually a pretty complex procedure to describe. It's more than your typical steroid hormones (steroid binds to receptor, binds to DNA response element, etc.).

Here is a basic video version that answers the OP's original question:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/olc/dl/120109/bio47.swf
 

sv3

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Feb 24, 2009
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No you're correct. It does alter gene function.

You should pull out a real physiology book, it's actually a pretty complex procedure to describe. It's more than your typical steroid hormones (steroid binds to receptor, binds to DNA response element, etc.).

Here is a basic video version that answers the OP's original question:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/olc/dl/120109/bio47.swf
thanks for confirming. Yeah im sure there's differences for all of them.....right now i'm just trying to know what i need to know for the mcat. the other crap can wait until i am enslaved by a medical (somewhere on planet earth perhaps if i get lucky)

cheers