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Employer preference for ADN or BSN?

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by alikat990, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. alikat990

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    I currently have a BBA and have determined business is not the ideal field where I want to have a career. I've been taking the usual prerequisite courses to apply to nursing and am now at a point where I need to decide if I want to pursue an ADN or BSN degree. Advantage for ADN to me is lower cost (through a community college) and less time to complete it (about 6 months less). Advantage for a BSN is the ability to further my education without having to get an ADN and then a BSN down the road and the distinction of a University degree instead of a community college (I have also looked at an accelerated BSN, but no schools anywhere near where we would be going actually have one).

    The hospitals in my area (New Mexico) seem to accept both, but my boyfriend is applying to med school and I would be moving with him if he goes out of state.
    --I am curious if anyone knows if employers across the US generally have a preference for ADN or BSN or if there is not a big distinction between the two because of the shared requirement, after both degrees, to pass the NCLEX.
     
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  3. torshi

    torshi Squirrel
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    BSN is good only if you want to pursue a higher degree in the near future such as becoming a nurse practitioner or CRNA. If your contempt on just being an RN, then ADN is fine.
     
  4. The right Path

    The right Path Goodbye Cherry Ames
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    I can only speak with certainty about where I work. Yes, absolutely a BSN is preferred and they are willing to pay a higher differential (albeit nominal) for BSNs. I believe this is a general trend. Particularly in desirable locations, and most particularly in hospitals that have Magnet status or those that are trying to acheive Magnet.

    Finding a good position or even sometimes any nursing postion is very difficult for new grads these days (of course varying by locale). Having a BSN can make an applicant more competitive, however, having a few years of experience tops that. But all other things being equal, the RN with at least a BSN is more likely to be chosen over the one with the ASN.
     
  5. atcpt1

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    My limited experience:

    What matters most is the individual and experience.

    They hire the person, not the degree.

    I don't know for sure...perhaps somebody can clarify...but magnet status has to do with nurse-patient ratios, right?

    Not degree

    Could be wrong on that though.

    Personally, I would look at the cost of the degree, access to the degree, and time to get degree as deciding factors.
     
  6. The right Path

    The right Path Goodbye Cherry Ames
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    Magnet status is a big huge expensive endeavor that encompasses many things, and taking a 30 second look at their website, I couldn't find a nice list of exactly what.

    Here are a few things that I do know are scrutinized:

    Nurse education levels
    Nurse satisfaction levels
    Nurse retention levels
    Nurse-sensitive quality indicators (i.e. VAP, BSI, etc).

    Of course cost is an important factor to consider when considering where to go for education. Ability to find work is another. I went to an expensive private school and with scholarships, grants, etc. it was very doable. So I wouldn't recommend dismissing a more expensive program out of hand. And that's just my experience and two cents. YMMV.

    And I agree, these days in particular experience is key. Orienting a new grad is expensive and a gamble for employers. That's why it's important to have some standout qualities that put a new grad ahead of their other new grad competitors.
     
  7. LaurelAnne

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    Many hospitals, including my employer are now requiring BSN degrees for new hires. I recommend the BSN however, if it is too much of a financial burden I see nothing wrong with first obtaining an Associate degree fom a community college. You could work as an RN also while obtaining your BSN. You will get much more out of your BSN with some nursing experience. It really depends on where you want to work. If you plan on working in a Physician Office, Clinic, School, Long Term Care an ASN degree is fine, but once you move into the hospital setting the BSN is preferred. Take in mind that this is fairly new and probably depends on where you are in the US. Also, salaries vary greatly depending on places of employment. In my area a RN that does direct patient care can make anywhere from $15 -$48 for example. Big difference.
     
  8. jwk

    jwk CAA, ASA-PAC Contributor
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    A lot depends on the school and employer. A lot of BSN programs don't have that much more in their nursing curriculum than the ADN programs. The difference is all the university "core requirements" that go into it - full year of science, full year of English, full year of social science, full year of humanities, etc., etc. In many cases, an RN with a bachelor's degree = a BSN.
     
  9. zenman

    zenman Senior Member
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    I'd just go with the ADN if you're also ok with the teacher whose teaching your kid (assuming you have one) also has an associate's degree.
     
  10. chimichanga

    chimichanga misunderstood
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    I'm not sure about other states, but in AZ (for ADN AND BSN), one still has to have a Master's to lecture, and a BSN to teach clinicals.
    Not sure where you're talking about.
     
  11. jwk

    jwk CAA, ASA-PAC Contributor
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    Funny thing - "nursing" has been trying to get the BSN as the "entry-level" for nurses for more than 30 years. Why are there still ADN nurses?

    I can tell you why. SOMEBODY has to actually take care of patients. I can tell you who doesn't - those BSN's and MSN's who like to put lots of extra initials after their names to impress somebody and wouldn't lay hands on a patient if their life depended on it.

    My hospital has seventeen layers of nursing hierarchy between staff nurse and director of nursing. Seventeen. How friggin absurd. Once you get past staff nurse and maybe one or two more levels up the food chain, the chances that many of those BSN/MSN-types actually participate in patient care approaches zero.

    I'll take a good ADN nurse any day (no offense intended to the BSN's that are actually in the trenches working :) )
     
  12. zenman

    zenman Senior Member
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    The development of the ADN was a knee-jerk reaction, which seems to be common in nursing. I believe all other professions have a BS/BA as entry level. What I'm saying is that if you're happy with us being different than other professions go right ahead. Just make sure that you're perfectly happy having your kids taught by teachers with associate degrees.

    Keep in mind I'm not talking about people, just the degree. I've had LPN's run all over RN's. And as a person who went from CNA, Army medic, LPN, RN, and as a person who taught in both ADN and BSN programs, I can tell you that there is a difference between the two degrees. Every additional class you take is not a waste. I'm not arguing this point as it should be perfectly clear and I'm not about to waste my time if someone can't comprehend the obvious. And even with two master's degrees only a few years ago, I was humping it on a med-surg floor. Now that I have even more education behind me I just seem to be smarter than ever. ;)
     
  13. ChillyRN

    ChillyRN DNP, FNP-BC
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    Controversy aside, the last few places I worked as a RN didn't hire ADNs, and those that were already employed had to complete the BSN by a certain deadline or lose their position. When I visited UPenn, they told me that their goal was to have 50%, at minimum, of the staff nurses MSN prepared. I worked with a few MSN staff nurses over the years, but not a lot. I'd be very surprised if that becomes the norm. I also read the the state of NY is considering going to all BSN prepared RNs. I don't know the particulars but I don't think this trend is uncommon, so I'd check into the areas where you think you might move. Better to be prepared than surprised! Good luck.
     
  14. jwk

    jwk CAA, ASA-PAC Contributor
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    There has been a push to have the BSN as the "entry level" for RN's for decades. It ain't happened yet.
     
  15. ChillyRN

    ChillyRN DNP, FNP-BC
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    Obviously. My point is merely that the OP should look carefully at the current trends in the proposed areas for relocation because some places are more interested in the BSN now than others. If considering a move to NY or the Philly area, for example, it would be prudent to be looking at BSN programs. That isn't to say she couldn't find employment as a ADN, just that she might not be as competitive and might not get the position she really preferred. Just food for thought.:prof:
     
  16. FireCloud9

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    since 2000, the number of licensed vocational nurse (lVn) educational programs in California has more than doubled to over 200, driven by the proliferation of private, for-profit programs. lVn employment per capita increased slightly.

    lvN education programs in California have more than doubled since 2000, with a rapid increase occuring between 2004 and 2010.

    in 2009, approximately 2 out of every 3 graduates completed an associate degree program.

    source: http://www.chcf.org/~/media/MEDIA%20LIBRARY%20Files/PDF/C/PDF%20CaliforniaNursesFactsFigures2010.pdf

    overall job satisfaction continues to increase among rNs working in California - 4.14 out of 5 very satisfied.

    California rNs have enjoyed large increases in income over the last two decades. inflation-adjusted incomes increased by more than 50 percent from 1990 to 2008. Annual Income from all Registered Nursing Positions,
    California, 1990 ($52,462) to 2008 ($81,428)

    the California rN workforce is aging. more rNs are approaching retirement age with fewer rNs to replace them. Nearly half of the nursing workforce is over 50 and a recent survey found that 12 percent are planning to retire over the next 5 years.
     

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