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EMT vs. Paramedic

Discussion in 'Pre-Hospital [ EMS ]' started by Serfes, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Serfes

    Serfes Member
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    Can anyone please explain the basic differences between an EMT and a paramedic as far as educational requirements, employment opportunities, salary, etc.?

    Thanks.
     
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  3. bandaidsNhoses

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    THE US DOT requirements for EMT Basic is approx 110hours classroom and ~8hours of ER observation prior to obtaining certification.

    WHEREAS: the Paramedic portion is an additional:
    {1000hrs + classroom(depending on who administers program)
    {AND ~500+ hrs (again varies) in rotations in the following:
    [Adult ER
    [Pediatrics ER
    [ICU/SICU/PICU
    [OB/GYN
    [Psych
    [OR/Anethesia
    [Morgue
    [Ambulance

    (Did I miss anything big? Pipe up if I did! :idea: )

    Salaries vary from state to state to Municipal vs Private Organizations. Check JEMS.com for the annual salary survey. I think there was a post about that earlier on the board.

    Generally, in the NYC metro area, EMTs typically start out @ 28k-35k and Medics start @ 38-44k

    -chrisC
     
  4. FoughtFyr

    FoughtFyr SDN Lifetime Donor
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    In the Greater Chicago area those salaries are generally accurate with one exception. As an EMT there is almost no "911" work available. Chicago FD does have 6 BLS ambulances, but those are filled from the firefighter ranks. Almost no municipalities have paid BLS crews (there are volley units). So the EMT ends up working for a private, non-emergent, ambulance transport company ("gomer hauling").

    - H
     
  5. oudoc08

    oudoc08 Please pass the gas...
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    If I'm not mistaken, the new curriculum has gone up significantly in terms of clinical hours. Somewhere around 1000-1200? (Int/P-med combined)
     
  6. Serfes

    Serfes Member
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    Where are these courses generally offered? Community colleges and/or universities?
     
  7. EMT036

    EMT036 MS-III/AEMT/Rescue Diver
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    Yeah usually either community colleges, universities, hospitals, or local (volly) fire/EMS departments. In my county, the EMS council and Regional Emerg. Med. Organization also host one. In NYC, there are also private companies that do EMS training....
     
  8. bandaidsNhoses

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    Uhhhm i'm in the medic program now. We're only required to do 500 hours. I know some other programs in NYC require 600+ I know my program conforms to national registry as that's one of the 4 tests I take to graduate....Class final, State, National Registry, NYC MAC... :eek:

    Community colleges, REMSCO, Hospitals, Vocational schools, FD/VACs host the course EMT & or Medic program. You just have to find one near you. Start with contacting your state DOH and they'll point you in the right direction.
     
  9. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc
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    I guess it is pretty variable. my program required> 1200 hrs over 10 yrs ago with a required/acceptable # of procedures, als workups, etc..
    we did 6 months of classroom followed by 3 months in the hospital followed by 6 months in the field. and they sent us to real ****holes like fresno to do our field time....mmmmm farming accidents........
     
  10. southerndoc

    southerndoc life is good
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    You can always go to Seattle and do a 3200-3600 hour paramedic course. ;)
     
  11. FoughtFyr

    FoughtFyr SDN Lifetime Donor
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    Where I trained in Illinois we had similar requirements. Of course that was back in 1993-1994 ymmv.

    - H
     
  12. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc
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    I've worked with these guys.....they have a waiting list several years long to get into their program and you have to do the whole thing even if already medic certified. it's probably worth it though...these guys start central lines in the field and have a lot of awesome protocols.
     
  13. leviathan

    leviathan Drinking from the hydrant
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    Central lines in the field???? Anyone have a link to the stuff Seattle does?
     
  14. TerraMedicX

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  15. leviathan

    leviathan Drinking from the hydrant
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    Nice! I didn't even realize that. I started to make a thread and that function came up showing old threads similar to yours, and I guess I clicked on it. :laugh:

    PS: Thanks for the link.
     
  16. jbar

    jbar Senior Member
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    What do they mean central lines? Are they considering an EJ a central line? I would think that if you needed a line badly and there was nothing peripheral or EJ you'd go IO. It seems that many EDs are moving to ultrasound guided central lines, given that I would be curious why people would be doing central lines (non EJ) in the field.
     
  17. TerraMedicX

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    Its not very clear. The site states that they:

    "Institute intravenous (IV) catheters, saline locks, needles, or other cannulae (IV lines), in central and peripheral veins"

    This could just mean EJs, but it is vague enough that it could also mean something more central. Although I would hazard a guess that they're really just trying to SOUND like they do central lines and its just EJs because most "traditional" central lines are arterial (i.e. subclavians and femorals).

    Without asking someone who actually works at Harborview or with Medic 1, not sure if we can say.

    Nate.
     
  18. a_ditchdoc

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    Most central lines are venous. Arterial lines are generally used for monitoring pressures, not giving meds.

    It wouldn't surprise me that some service somewhere is doing central lines, especially a critical care service. Technically, they are not all that complicated.
     
  19. MacBook

    MacBook back in again...
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    Yikes, Our EMT program here is 1 year full time with a hospital and ambulance practicum. If you decide to go ahead and get your paramedic it's another 2 years full time with a total of 3 ambulance practcums and various inhospital rotations between the floors and the O.R. to get your intubations.

    EMR:$800-1,200 (takes one month to do)
    EMT:$4,800-5,500 (takes a year to do)
    EMT-P:$18,500-21,000 (2 years full time)

    Here EMTs start off at $22/hr where as our paramedics start off at $26/hr.

    www.collegeofparamedics.org is out governing body.

    Good Luck
     
  20. psychbender

    psychbender Cynical Member
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    Yeah, your definition of EMT and our definition of EMT (EMT-B) are a little different. Our EMT-B would be more akin to your EMR, our EMT-I with your EMT, and the paramedics are fairly comparable. Mind you, I haven't really looked too deeply into these things, this is all just what I've gotten off of one of my friends who is being deported back to Even Norther Dakota, and trying to continue with EMS up there.
     
  21. Coastie

    Coastie Junior Member
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    They are very difficult to master.

    I don't like the smell of the "sterile technique" if placed in the field. I'm trying to think why a paramedic would ever have to place one, especially in an urban setting such as Seattle, and I'm coming up short.

    I'd immediately pull it once the patient was in the ED and place a fresh one. Thanks for blowing one area of access, Seattle "ICU Medic" service!

    I also enjoy them listing "acetylsalicylic acid" as a med they must be "certified to give". :rolleyes:

    Diphenhydramine is another big gun.
     
  22. MacBook

    MacBook back in again...
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    Oh sorry, my misunderstanding. I didnt realise you folks were talking about Basics. Yes you are correct our EMRs here is the equivalency.
     
  23. leviathan

    leviathan Drinking from the hydrant
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    Alberta EMRs are not quite equivalent to Basics. Correct me if I'm wrong, but Alberta EMR is only an 80 hour program, where EMT-B is about 120 hours. The EMR programs that exist in the rest of Canada (which meet the paramedic competency profile) are all about 120 hours in length.
     

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