About the Ads

Rouelle

7+ Year Member
Jan 7, 2011
1,079
1,319
Status
Pharmacist
A pure crystalline solid typically has a sharp melting point (1-3° range from when melting is first observed to when the last crystal melts). When one mixes 2 crystalline solids, the melting point is usually lower than that of either individual component and the melting point range is broadened (8-10° or more, maybe much more). However at a specific ratio of the two components, one can get a mixture that has a well-defined, sharp melting point. At that ratio, you have a eutectic mixture. In this way the homogeneous mixture exhibits the same property (sharp MP) as a pure compound.
 

radio frequency

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2012
1,130
747
Status
Pharmacist
Also used in "green" chemistry as a means of cutting down use of solvents...
Go read a book, Martin's (seriously). Self improvement/studying things you should go over in school is no excuse for lazy posts asking to explain things
I back this post, especially as I specifically remember the Martin’s section on eutectic mixtures being especially good. You might have to read it more than once (I’m certain I did), but the information is there, and explained better than we can.
 

Old Timer

10+ Year Member
May 16, 2007
4,336
1,385
Status
Pharmacist
The melting point of an impure solid is lower than the melting point of a pure solid.

The most common is salt and ice.

The most common pharmacy EM is menthol and camphor. Mix the two solids together and they turn to liquid.......
 
  • Like
Reactions: catalyzt
About the Ads