tufts

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Now that most programs have chosen their chiefs for next year, I would like to take a poll of extra salaries around the country for the chief resident. Here at Tufts we do not get any extra base money, however, the program is kind enough to give us an extra $100 in reimbursable book money. I heard that Boston University chiefs get an extra $5000 a year.
 

Diamox

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I believe there is a "survey" feature in these forums if you wish to use it.

And, yes my program has extra cash for the top dog.
 

drvlad2004

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Nope, my hospital does not give extra money for being the chief resident. However, I have had a great experience being chief.
 

LTS6776

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At our program, you are Assistant Chief for 6 months before becoming Chief for 6 months. The Assistant Chief is not paid anything above their usual stipend, but receives approximately $600 extra during their time as Chief. It's probably not the greatest idea to base whether or not you accept the Chief Residency on finacial reasons. I can speak from personal experience, the job can be a daunting one, particularly at a large program. I think it is most important to think about what your responsibilities as Chief will be (which varies a lot from one program to the next) and how much support/help you will receive from others in the program and the department. When over the list of stuff I have done as chief this year, my additional stipend probably works out to less than $1/hour!
 
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tufts

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I don't ask this question to decide if the position is a worthwhile one to take due to the extra money. It is silly to think that a little extra money would motivate people be chief. I think that programs should pay them a little extra out of professional respect since the expectation is that they will do more work. Ironically, if a chief resident has very little ego and does not relish the respect or super chief resident powers that the title brings, what else is there? The ability to make changes in the program for the benefit of residents? Hardly, as Steve has pointed out on numerous posts.

Sorry to be so base, but if I am doing more work I think I should get paid more.

I was surprised that more people have not shared information about their programs, but then I realized that the chiefs do not really want to publicize to their other senior friends that they get paid more. People don't like to talk about how much they make.

As an aside, at our program there are two residents that are funded by the VA and get paid from there directly. They are getting paid about five thousand dollars more per year for some reason. Again, hard to investigate since no one likes to share their income information. I think our program administration is not aware of this.
 

ampaphb

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May 13, 2007
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Let's pretend you do make $5-600 per year extra. YOU LIVE IN BOSTON! after taxes, that will be worth closer to 300. If they pay you more than your colleagues, it is a gesture, and does not amount to more than a nice blazer or a cheap interview suit after taxes. There are chiefs in every department, so this is not a decision limited to PM&R - the entire institution has a policy regarding the matter.

Now as for "powers", "respect", and "the ability to make changes"? The roll of chief is largely administrative, and follows the surgical law of fecal haemodynamics ($hit rolls downhill). You will get all the tasks your staff and coordinators deem beneath them. You will be the voice of the residents at staff meetings, but unless you have an unusual chair, or can explain to both he and the PD why your changes will be good for THEM (not YOU and your fellow residents), you will accomplish minimal substantive change during your tenure (not you specifically, that is the roll of chief residents in general)
 

kurt rambis

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If you are considering doing administrative work as a large part of your practice, being a chief resident is a great warm up. Many physiatrists have aspirations of being a medical director or holding other administrative positions. You will get experience voicing your opinions at staff meetings, troubleshooting problems within the day to day residency grind, thinking about policy and being the voice of the residents to the attendings and administrative staff. The good part is that is is a finite amount of time and if you don't like it, it ends. I see it as a kind of administrative fellowship.

An extra $600 alone is not worth all the bs, but for certain people the experience can be valuable.
 

ShrikeMD

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Sep 14, 2007
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I don't ask this question to decide if the position is a worthwhile one to take due to the extra money. It is silly to think that a little extra money would motivate people be chief. I think that programs should pay them a little extra out of professional respect since the expectation is that they will do more work. Ironically, if a chief resident has very little ego and does not relish the respect or super chief resident powers that the title brings, what else is there? The ability to make changes in the program for the benefit of residents? Hardly, as Steve has pointed out on numerous posts.

Sorry to be so base, but if I am doing more work I think I should get paid more.

I was surprised that more people have not shared information about their programs, but then I realized that the chiefs do not really want to publicize to their other senior friends that they get paid more. People don't like to talk about how much they make.

As an aside, at our program there are two residents that are funded by the VA and get paid from there directly. They are getting paid about five thousand dollars more per year for some reason. Again, hard to investigate since no one likes to share their income information. I think our program administration is not aware of this.
I took the position because I wanted to help create a better program for myself and my colleagues (the residents). The extra money wasn't important, it was just a nice bonus. I knew that Dr. DeLisa, our Chairman, was highly motivated to improve the educational experience for his residents, and would likely respond to input from residents who could articulate the educational needs/concerns of the residents.

My plan "paid" off, for myself, and I would like to believe for the residents as well. Even now, many years later, I still get a "thank you" now and then when I bump into former residents at the AAPMR meetings. I remain friends/close friends with many of the residents in my class (especially my co-Chief), and succeeding classes. My positive interaction with our Chairman and faculty facilitated recommendations to fellowship and faculty positions later. The positive experience helped nurture a sense of self-empowerment that I carry with me to this day.

In summary, if you want to be (a) Chief, don't do it for the money. If you want to do it to help create a better training program/experience for yourself and your colleagues, to the extent that you can (or are allowed), then you can hope to be paid in ways that aren't best measured in dollars and cents.

Finally, I should quickly add that I don't think this positive experience would have been available to me in every program, or even in many programs. My program placed a high value on resident education, and with the help of our Chair, PD & fellow residents we were able to leverage that priority to greater mutual gain. If I had been in a program where "constructive feedback" is considered the hallmark of a troublemaker, then I would have never been considered for Chief. Either way, however, the money would have been irrelevant to me.
 

Juggler

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Shrike - I echo your sentiment exactly. The value of the year is beyond the minor additional stipend. The payment comes in the form of personal and professional development, and also knowing you helped keep the program going smoothly for another year!
 

Karaoke

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I'm chiefing next year at NYU, and I'm doing it
because (a) I am motivated to make our program
better than it is now, (b) I intend to be a medical
director/administrator in the future and this is a
nice way to get my feet wet, (c) I don't mind busy
work, and (d) you get to wield a jewel-encrusted
scepter that shoots fireballs at unruly PGY2s.

I actually still don't know if we get any extra
money, but even if we do, I doubt I'd be impressed
with the amount. Maybe I'd buy an XBox. Grand
Theft Auto 4 looks *amazing*.