YankeesfanZF5

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So I am in orgo and physics with some other classes. On my first physics test I froze and ended up getting only a few questions right. Im thinking a 20 to 40 percent. (It happens I guess...sadly haha) Looks like I could possibly pull out an B or A if I work my butt off in the class but I will be happy with a C at this point. I would then work hard for an A or B second semester. I have a 3.8 gpa right now and just started my sophmore year of college. Also these are my last two med school prereqs. I really want to get into my state medical school and be a family medicine doctor in my hometown where I attend college. I have never failed an exam before. I was wondering if a C in a med school prereq will kill my chances of acceptance and what to do now to improve my knowledge of physics and come up with a decent grade? Any help is much appreciated.
 

Lannister

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Use this first exam as a learning experience. Why did you freeze? Did you not study enough? Did you think you understood the concepts but realized once you sat for the exam that you did not?

It's too early in the semester to be calculating your final grade. Especially since you haven't even gotten your grade back.
 

FindMeOnTheLinks

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One C won't hurt. Just do your best in your current classes and in future courses and you'll be just fine. For physics it's good to not only make sure you know all the important equations but what's imperative is that understand the concepts and that you're able to apply that knowledge. So the best form of studying is to do as many practice questions you can - go back over your homework problem sets and make sure you understand every question. Do any suggested problem sets from the end of the chapters in your textbook, etc... And if you're struggling with your understanding, the best thing you can do is find a tutor or go to your professors office hours.

Also don't forget that courses like physics are generally heavily curved (when I took physics the class average was like in the 60's, but obviously will vary by school) so maybe your exam won't result in a failure as well. Don't worry too much yet.
 
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The infamous sophomore year dip. I went from a 3.87 to a 3.74, then back to a 3.84. Don't sweat it too much, just work hard/do your best this year and climb out of it.
 

Azete

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Physics is the only class in undergrad that I felt like I could have a complete understanding of the material and still score a 50%. Thankfully, 50% was usually enough for an A with the massive curves.
 
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YankeesfanZF5

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Sep 19, 2015
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Use this first exam as a learning experience. Why did you freeze? Did you not study enough? Did you think you understood the concepts but realized once you sat for the exam that you did not?

It's too early in the semester to be calculating your final grade. Especially since you haven't even gotten your grade back.
I know my final grade on the exam will be very low due to not knowing what to do on 60 points worth of problems. I thought I knew the material, but it must not have clicked. I reread the chapters in my book and my notes to study. I already told him after the exam of my situation and am planning on abusing his office hours and going to tutoring. I think it was just not knowing where to start on certain problems. I am unsure if a curve will help, I believe I got the worst grade in the class. Planning to work harder from here on out. It was a great wake up call for someone who has always been naturally good at school. Thanks for the reply and help.
 
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YankeesfanZF5

2+ Year Member
Sep 19, 2015
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Medical Student
One C won't hurt. Just do your best in your current classes and in future courses and you'll be just fine. For physics it's good to not only make sure you know all the important equations but what's imperative is that understand the concepts and that you're able to apply that knowledge. So the best form of studying is to do as many practice questions you can - go back over your homework problem sets and make sure you understand every question. Do any suggested problem sets from the end of the chapters in your textbook, etc... And if you're struggling with your understanding, the best thing you can do is find a tutor or go to your professors office hours.

Also don't forget that courses like physics are generally heavily curved (when I took physics the class average was like in the 60's, but obviously will vary by school) so maybe your exam won't result in a failure as well. Don't worry too much yet.
Unsure of a curve I thought I heard a lot of other students did not do well on the exam. Averages from 50 to 60 percent I think. My other prehealth buddies said they probably failed also. It is also my physics profs first year teaching. Pretty sure my exam will still be an F but maybe he will curve it to a higher percentage :) Thank you for the ideas when it comes to studying. I will apply these ideas from here on out to tests, labs and homework. I also explained to him I want to have a very solid understanding of basic physics for the MCAT. So wish me best of luck I want to do well but it is gonna be a long year haha. Again thanks for help, your helping out a stressed out kid.
 
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Lannister

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I know my final grade on the exam will be very low due to not knowing what to do on 60 points worth of problems. I thought I knew the material, but it must not have clicked. I reread the chapters in my book and my notes to study. I already told him after the exam of my situation and am planning on abusing his office hours and going to tutoring. I think it was just not knowing where to start on certain problems. I am unsure if a curve will help, I believe I got the worst grade in the class. Planning to work harder from here on out. It was a great wake up call for someone who has always been naturally good at school. Thanks for the reply and help.
Well there's your problem. Rereading the textbook and your notes is a horrible way to study for physics. You need to be doing practice problems.
 
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YankeesfanZF5

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Well there's your problem. Rereading the textbook and your notes is a horrible way to study for physics. You need to be doing practice problems.
Sorry I have little physics background. So read the chapter, take notes and do lots and lots of practice problems in class, with friends and online? And watch khan academy? Was my plan from here on out. Any other suggestions? Man thank you guys you have been very helpful!
 

Lannister

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Sorry I have little physics background. So read the chapter, take notes and do lots and lots of practice problems in class, with friends and online? And watch khan academy? Was my plan from here on out. Any other suggestions? Man thank you guys you have been very helpful!
It's alright, failure is the best way to learn. Now you know that just reading is not enough, you have to be actively doing problems to really understand the concepts.
 
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YankeesfanZF5

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Sep 19, 2015
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Thanks
It's alright, failure is the best way to learn. Now you know that just reading is not enough, you have to be actively doing problems to really understand the concepts.
Yeah I must not have practiced enough but I will do problems until I can do them in my sleep from here on out. Thanks again.
 
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YankeesfanZF5

2+ Year Member
Sep 19, 2015
129
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Medical Student
The infamous sophomore year dip. I went from a 3.87 to a 3.74, then back to a 3.84. Don't sweat it too much, just work hard/do your best this year and climb out of it.
Thanks I will try and its good to know that other people have these struggles.